20 terms

Energy Flow and Trophic Levels

All living things depend on their environment and need energy to survive.
STUDY
PLAY
BIOMASS
Organic matter made by producers. Also, the total dry weight of all living organisms in a trophic level.
SUN (RADIANT ENERGY)
Our closest star that is the source of light and heat for the planets in the solar system. Plus the source of energy for most ecosystems on earth.
AUTOTROPH OR PRODUCER
Organism that makes its own food by photosynthesis
CONSUMER OR HETEROTROPH
Organisms that obtain energy by feeding on other organisms
PRIMARY CONSUMER
Herbivore: organism in the trophic level of an ecosystem that eats plants or algae
SECONDARY CONSUMER
Member of a trophic level of an ecosystem consisting of carnivores that eat herbivores.
DETRITIVORE
Organism that feeds on decomposing plant and animal remains and other dead matter
DECOMPOSER
Organism that breaks down wastes and dead organisms (bacteria and fungus)
FOOD WEB
Complex arrangement of interrelated food chains illustrating flow of energy between interdependent organisms.
FOOD CHAIN
Series of levels in which organisms transfer energy by eating and being eaten
TROPHIC LEVEL
Position in a food chain or ecological pyramid occupied by a group of organisms with similar feeding mode.
ENERGY PYRAMID
A model that illustrates the biomass productivity at multiple trophic levels in a given ecosystem.
HERBIVORE
Consumer that eats only plants.
CARNIVORE
Animal that eats only other animals.
OMNIVORE
Animal that eats both plants and animals
PREDATOR
Animal that hunts other animals for food
TERTIARY CONSUMERS
Carnivores that eat secondary consumers
ECOSYSTEM
Biological community of interacting organisms and their physical environment.
TEN PERCENT
Amount of energy transferred to each trophic level in an ecosystem
NINETY PERCENT
Amount of energy that is transferred into the environment by metabolic heat or used by an organism to operate its systems

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