48 terms

Chapter 13 - Program Development and Programming Languages

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Procedural programming
An approach to program design in which a program is separated into small modules that are called by the main program or another module when needed.
Variable
A named memory location defined in a computer program that is used to store the current value of a data item used in that program.
Object-oriented programming (OOP)
An approach to program design in which a program consists of a collection of objects that contain data and methods to be used with that data.
Aspect-oriented programming (AOP)
An approach to program design in which different functions are clearly separated so program components can be developed and modified individually from one another, and the components can be easily reused with separate, non related objects.
Program development
The process of creating application programs.
Program development life cycle (PDLC)
The process containing the five phases of program development: analyzing, designing, coding, debugging and testing, and implementing and maintaining application software.
Problem analysis
The phase of the program development life cycle in which the problem is carefully considered and the program specifications are developed.
Programmer
A person whose job it is to write, test, and maintain computer programs.
Program design
The phase of the program development life cycle in which the program specifications are expanded into a complete design of the new program.
Flowchart
A program design tool that shows graphically step-by-step the actions a computer program will take.
Pseudocode
A program design tool that uses English-like statements to outline the logic of a program.
Unified Modeling Language (UML)
A set of standard notations for creating business models.
Control structure
A pattern for controlling the flow of logic in a computer program, module, or method.
Sequence control structure
A series of statements that follow one another.
Selection control structure
A series of statements in with the results of a decision determine the direction the program takes.
Repetition control structure
A series of statements in a loop that are repeated until a particular condition is met.
Program coding
The phase of the program development life cycle in which the program code is written using a programming language.
Coding
The process of writing the programming language statements to create a computer program.
Source code
A computer program before it is compiled.
Program debugging and testing
The phase of the program development life cycle that ensures a program is correct and works as intended.
Debugging
The process of ensuring a program is free of errors.
Object code
The machine language version of a computer program generated after the program's source code is compiled.
Language translator
A software program that converts program code to machine language.
Compiler
A language translator that converts an entire program into machine language before executing it.
Interpreter
A language translator that converts program statements line-by-line into machine language, immediately executing each one.
Syntax error
A programming error that occurs when the programmer has not followed the rules of the programming language.
Logic error
A programming error that occurs when running a program produces incorrect results.
Program implementation and maintenance
The phase of the program development life cycle in which the program is implemented and then maintained, as needed, to remain useful.
Application lifecycle management (ALM)
A broad term to describe complete systems that can be used to create and manage an application throughout its entire life cycle-from design through retirement.
Software development kit (SDK)
A programming package designed for a particular platform that enables programmers to develop applications for that platform more quickly and easily.
Rich Internet application (RIA)
A Web-based application that works like an installed software program.
Programming language
A set of rules, worlds, symbols, and codes used to write computer programs.
Low-level language
A class of programming languages that is highly detailed and machine-dependent.
Machine language
A low-level programming language in which the program code consist of 0s and 1s.
Assembly language
A low-level programming language that uses names and other symbols to replace some of the 0s and 1s in machine language.
High-level language
A class of programming languages that is closer to natural language and easier to work with than a low-level language.
Fourth-generaltion language (4GL)
A class of programming languages that is closer to natural language and easier to work with than a high-level language.
FORTRAN
A high-level programming language used for mathematical, scientific, and engineering applications.
COBOL
A high-level programming language developed for transaction processing applications.
Pascal
A structured, high-level programming language often used to teach structured programming, especially appropriate for use in math and science applications.
BASIC
An easy-to-learn, high-level programming language that was developed to be used by beginning programmers.
Visual Basic
A version of the BASIC programming language that is visual and supports object-oriented programming
C
A high-level structured programming language that has the execution efficiency of an assembly language.
C++
A newer, object-oriented version of the C programming language.
C#
The newest, object-oriented version of the C programming language.
Java
A high-level, object-oriented programming language frequently used for Web-based applications.
Phython
A high-level, open source, dynamic object-oriented programming language that can be used to develop a wide variety of applications.
Ruby
A high-level, open-source, object-oriented programming language that is often used to develop Web applications.