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Humanities

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The Renaissance
The historical revival of Classical culture
Chinese humanism
elevated intellectual life over religious faith
The hero's journey
a monomyth or a world myth
Inductive reasoning
proceeds from particular facts to a general conclusion (or from effect to cause).
Architecture
is considered art because it is concerned with the aesthetic effect of structures in their surrounding environment.
Age of Enlightenment
The ideas of the Renaissance are most commonly seen as paving the way for
Donatello
was a Renaissance sculptor
Aristotle
This philosopher is best known for his argument that a life guided by reason and virtue would lead to happiness.
trompe l'oeil
An art technique that uses realistic imagery to create the illusion of three dimensions
a metaphor
In the Iliad, the poet Homer uses the phrase "the wine-dark sea." This is an example of an author using:
Jean-Honoré Fragonard, The Captured Kiss
Eros Statue in Piccadilly Circus London
Odysseus Overcome (Ulysses at the court of Alcinous by Francesco Hayez, circa 1815
celebration of the individual
Renaissance artists signing their work reflects
caused a decline during the Renaissance of the power and authority of the Roman Catholic Church
I. The Protestant Reformation
II. The Great Schism
III. Popular heretical movements
"The whole glory of man lies in activity."
illustrates Renaissance humanism's stress on engagement with the world
Mona Lisa by Leonardo da Vinci, the Renaissance
c. 1503-1519
Gattamelata by Donatello, 1450 Sculpture during the Renaissance
Don Quixote de la Mancha and Sancho Panza (1863) by Gustave Doré, Literature during the Renaissance
Humanism
the study of the creative and intellectual contributions of human cultures
Symbolism
use of a symbol, object, or image to represent something else (that is, a concept or idea
Movement
a change of position, location, or timeframe; sense of motion, action, or time created in a work of art; distinct compositional units of a symphony; broad thematic social and artistic concerns of a given time period as expressed in its works of art
Epistemology
the branch of formal philosophy concerned with the nature and limits of human knowledge
Setting
the environment and context in which a creative work is set or takes place
Monomyth
the hero's journey archetype that appears in all cultures
Architecture
the science and art of designing buildings and other structures
The Eightfold Path
the Buddhist guide to a life of peace and harmony including eight directives for living a "right" life
Aesthetics
a conception of what is artistically valid or beautiful in art, culture, or nature
Rhythm
variation of the length and accentuation of a series of sounds or movements over time; in poetry, the arrangement of spoken words alternating stressed and unstressed elements
Point of view
the position or perspective from which something is viewed or related
Imagery
employment of evocative images in works of art, especially poetry and literature, where words can summon up "mental pictures" for the reader
Synthesis
the combination of thesis and antithesis which produces a new and higher level of truth
Sympathetic magic
a mythic ceremony or ritual found in early societies designed to influence the behavior of deities or supernatural forces
Heresy
a challenge to or rejection of the orthodox doctrines of a religion or church
Tone
the basic element of music, also called a note; it is used to construct a melody
Metaphor
a figure of speech in which something is explained in terms of something else
Aesthetic experience
an experience of beauty that inspires a feeling of pleasure which is its own justification
Deductive reasoning
reasoning from the general to the particular (or from cause to effect)
Philosophy
the systematic investigation of fundamental questions concerning such matters as existence, reality, consciousness, knowledge, truth, and justice
Agape
Greek term for platonic love
Logic
thinking in a linear, step-by-step manner about ideas or problems
Epicureanism
a philosophy which asserts that the greatest happiness in life is found in avoiding pain
Archetypes
the emblematic mythic characters, images, plot patterns, symbols, and buried assumptions shared across cultures
Context
set of facts or circumstances that surround a work of art and help us determine and clarify its meaning
Scientific method
a method of designing controlled experiments, gathering data, and developing and testing hypotheses about the natural world
Style
characteristics of a work of art that identify it with a particular artist, region, artistic movement, or historic period
Ethics
the study of the moral values of an individual, group, or culture
Pragmatic reasoning
reasoning that assumes the truth of an idea can be validated by its practical outcome
Apollonian response
an analytical, rational, objective reaction
Mahayana
Buddhist discipline that emphasizes selfless action on behalf of others
Renaissance man
a term describing an individual with broad knowledge and versatile talents spanning many intellectual and artistic disciplines
Empirical study
a study derived from experiment and observation rather than theory
Figurative explanation
a colorful, image-filled, metaphor-rich use of language to describe art or life
Propaganda
the systematic propagation of information promoting a doctrine or cause
Harmony
congruity or compatibility of parts with one another and with the whole; the state of all elements being in perfect balance
Classical humanism
the cultural movement of the Renaissance, based on Greek and Roman classic literature, that emphasized the dignity, worth, and rationality of humankind
Dionysian response
a spontaneous, unstructured, creative, passionate reaction
Cinema
an artistic medium that uses the motion picture as a vehicle for story telling and other creative expression
Trompe l'oeil
a style of painting that creates the optical illusion of three dimensionality
Inductive reasoning
reasoning that proceeds from particular facts to a general conclusion
Myths
traditional stories of a people or culture that serve to explain some natural phenomenon, the origin of humanity, or customs or religious rites
Eros
Greek term for erotic love or lust
Renaissance
a period in Western history, from the 14th through the 16th centuries, marked by a revival of interest in the culture of Greco-Roman antiquity and a flourishing of artistic and intellectual achievement
The Hero's Journey
the mythic quest in pursuit of some destination or goal whose attainment will lend greater meaning to life
Art edifying and persuading
The documentary film "An Inconvenient Truth" about former vice president Al Gore's campaign to warn the public about climate change is an example of which of the following purposes of art?
Aesthetic perception
the innate or learned ability to appreciate a work of art
Langston Hughes
An American poet who helped establish "jazz poetry"?
gouache
A watercolor painting to which an opaque white has been added
Photography
An artistic discipline that fosters Pictorialism
Symmetry
exact duplication of elements (shapes, forms, etc) on either side of a central axis
A mobile
a type of kinetic sculpture in which parts move, often by air currents
Eclecticism
a movement that stresses the inclusion or combination of several different styles in one composition or work of art
formal
The elegant gardens at Versailles are an example of ___________ landscape design
Fountain (1917) by Marcel Duchamp
(The French artist called this provocative artwork a "readymade." Such an item is also known as a found object* or found art.)
Liberty Leading the People (1830) by Eugène Delacroix
Thomas Moran's painting, Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone (1872)
allowed viewers in the nineteenth century to temporarily escape from the increasingly crowded cities of the eastern United States and imagine themselves in the wide-open spaces of the West. The painting also encouraged tourism, thereby helping to boost the economy of Western states
The Bayeux Tapestry, c. 1070 (PD).
from the Middle Ages functioned as political propaganda when it was created (and still does today). It depicts the Norman Conquest of England in 1066 and honors William the Conqueror for his victory in battle.
A Medieval vision: Masolino, Temptation of Adam and Eve, (1425)
A Renaissance vision: Masaccio, The Expulsion from the Garden of Eden, (1426)
Illuminating the spiritual
The Baroque composer would believe that he was______
Political and social commentary
function of art is best reflected in an anti-war protest song
shading and perspective
Artists often employ _______________to achieve the effect of three-dimensions on flat surfaces.
repetition
is the use of the same visual element several times in a work of art
intensity
The strength, or purity of a color
harmony
is the natural and comforting arrangement of visual elements.
Representing the world
purpose of art is most clearly reflected in a documentary on the NASA space shuttle program. The space shuttle documentary primarily provides a record of the world.
asymmetry
The uneven distribution of elements throughout an artwork is
space
A sense or feeling of depth, either actual or implied, is called
Line
has the properties of direction, width and length.
palette
An artist's use of color is sometimes called _____________.
Figurative
In two-dimensional art, texture is ______________.
Unity
_______________ makes a work of art feel cohesive and finished, with all the elements looking as though they belong together
Historical artifact
A museum collection of 19th century Wedgewood china would reflect the______ artifact function.
Aquatint
______________ is a method of etching that imitates the broad tints of a water color.
Lithography
is a planographic process
Alfred Stieglitz
This American photographer was a leading advocate of Pictorialism
screenprinting
Serigraphy is also known as ____________.
Photography
_as a visual art requires the photographer to design an image, compose an image, and execute an image.
tempera
A water-based paint that uses egg, glue, or casein as a binder is called:
acrylic paint
One advantage of this media for painting is that it does not yellow with age.
Chiaroscuro
This technique creates the illusion of depth through gradations of light and shade
Group f/64
Straight or pure photography was advocated by ____
Stippling
In drawing, using dots for tone, texture, and shading is called __________.
Trompe l'oeil
Two-dimensional art that is so naturalistic that it appears to have depth and distance has been dubbed by the French ________________.
Intaglio
The printmaking technique of ___________ prints an image from a recessed design incised or etched into the surface of a plate.
scale
The size or apparent size of an object seen in relation to other objects, people, or its environment is:
Relief sculpture
A sculpture employing three-dimensions attached to a background and meant to be seen from one side is called:
Central Park (NYC)
Frederick Law Olmstead is known for his design of:
cantilever
A projecting beam or bracket stabilized by the weight of the wall from which it extends is called a:
Manipulation
______________ is when a sculptor shapes the material by hand.
found object sculpture
Marcel Duchamp's Bicycle Wheel is an example of a:
Substitution
When a sculptor casts an artwork, he or she is using the process of _______________.
Mobile
A kinetic sculpture in which parts move, often by air currents, is called:
key factors in landscape design
the function of the design,those for whom the spaces are created and the influence of the particular site and surroundings
Functionalism
Architects who design buildings based on the purpose of the structure are following ___________________.
Collage
a composition made of various materials (as paper, cloth, or wood) glued on a surface
Perspective
the representation of objects receding into the distance in two-dimensional art
Intensity
the strength, or purity of a color
Mass
the size, shape, and volume of three-dimensional forms
Compressive strength
ability of a material to withstand crushing
Negative
mold from which a sculpture is cast
Glyptic
sculpture which emphasizes the substances or materials from which it is made
Substitution
when the sculptor molds or casts an artwork
Watercolor
a vivid water-based paint, usually applied to paper, with outstanding brilliance and translucence; also, term for resulting artwork
Weathering
the effect of the weather/environment on the surface of an artwork
Art
skill and imagination used to create or produce aesthetic objects
Oil paint
a paint made of color pigments mixed in slowly drying oil; its main binding agent for pigment is linseed oil
Scale
the size or apparent size of an object seen in relation to other objects, people, or its environment
Texture
the surface quality (roughness or smoothness) of materials, either actual or implied
Low relief
sculptural relief that projects very little from the background; also called bas-relief
Serigraphy
a printing technique that forces ink through a stencil (image) on a screen stretched with a fine silk or similar fabric; also called silk-screening or screen-printing
Space
a sense or feeling of depth, either actual or implied
Focal area
the place to which a viewer's eye is drawn in a work of art
Juxtaposition
the side-by-side placement of objects in an artwork or composition
Subtraction
when the sculptor carves or cuts away unwanted material to create the work
Hue
the common name of a color (red, blue, green, yellow) and its position in the spectrum or on the color wheel
Capital
a decorative device generally placed at the top of a column as a transition for the eye
Color
the perception of reflected or emitted light in terms of hue, value, and intensity
Dome
a common structural element of architecture resembling the hollow upper half of a sphere
Relief sculpture
a sculpture employing three-dimensions attached to a background and meant to be seen from one side
Ephemeral
sculpture designed to make a statement and then cease to exist
Sunken relief
sculptural relief in which the image or design is modeled below the original surface of the background, which is not cut away
High relief
sculptural relief in which forms extend from the background to at least half their depth
Intaglio
a printing technique in which an image is printed from a recessed design incised or etched into the surface of a plate
Value
the relative lightness or darkness of color
Graphite
a soft form of carbon used in pencils
Aerial or atmospheric perspective
the use of light, atmosphere, and haziness to indicate depth or distance
Balance
a sense of equilibrium in an artwork, achieved through weight, attention, or attraction of visual element
Rhythm
the ordered recurrence or repetition of elements
Artistic form
elements (lines, shapes, colors) of a work of art organized to effect participants
Proportion
the relative relationship of shapes or forms to one another in regards to size, height, width, length, or depth
Impasto
the thick application of paint creating a textured surface on the canvas
Fresco
a painting technique that applies water-based paint to a wet-plaster surface; also, resulting artwork
Manipulation
when a sculptor shapes the material by hand (modeling clay or other materials)
Variation
how often an element is used and the relationship of one element to another
Aquatint
a method of etching (intaglio) that imitates the broad tints of a water colo
Unity
when all elements in a work of art give a sense of oneness or self-contained completeness
Symmetry
the exact duplication of elements (shapes, forms, etc) on either side of a (usually imaginary) straight-lined central axis
Dynamics
when artwork creates a sense of motion through line, form, and juxtaposition
Pastel
a soft, colored chalk stick or crayon made of pigments and a gum binder, usually applied to paper; also, resulting artwork
Encaustic
a painting technique which originated in ancient times, using pigments mixed with melted beeswax as a binder
Form
the shape or mass of an object within an artwork or composition
Artifact
a work of art from a specific historical time or place
Addition
when a sculptor adds or combines material (sometimes called built sculpture)
Repetition
the recurrence of the same visual element in a work of art
Linear perspective
the use of foreshortening and a vanishing point to create the illusion of depth
Relief
in printing, a technique in which the intended printing surface is left raised, with remaining areas cut away
Eclecticism
the inclusion or combination of several different styles in one composition or work of art
Drypoint
a printmaking technique (intaglio) involving drawing directly onto the surface of a metal plate with a sharp, pointed tool, often with a diamond point
Tempera
a water-based paint that uses egg, glue, or casein as a binder; it dries with a flat, dull finish, which means it is not as luminous as oil paint
Articulation
a way of connecting the parts of a work of art
Palette
the range or set of colors characteristic of a particular artist
Tensile strength
ability of a material to withstand bending
Shifting perspective
when a viewer considers foreground and background independently and recognizes the separation between them
Linear sculpture
a sculpture employing two-dimensional materials
Acrylic
a paint made of color pigments with a synthetic polymer as a binder; it does not darken or yellow with age
Found object
when art is assembled from common every day items
Gouache
watercolor to which an opaque white has been added; also, resulting artwork
Full round sculpture
a sculpture employing three-dimensions and meant to be viewed from any and all angles
Functionalism
the belief that architects should design a building based on the purpose of that building
Content
the meaning of the work of ar
Lithography
a printing technique employing the antipathy of oil and water; a flat surface with a design area (image) that is ink-receptive is printed and the non-printed area is ink-repellent
Line
the path of a moving point through space
Asymmetry
the uneven distribution of elements throughout an artwork
Daguerreotype photography
named after its French inventor Louis Daguerre, an early (1839) photographic process where an image is made directly onto a light-sensitive silver-coated metallic plate, without using a negative
Mannerism
art movement of the Late Renaissance that emphasized artificiality, clashing colors, and emotional themes
abstract art
art that departs from natural or realistic appearances
Victorian photography
photography in the 19th century that experimented with realistic portraits and images of literary and biblical scenes
Neolithic art
art of the Late Stone Age, circa 8,000-3,000 B.C.E.
Dadaism
anti-establishment artistic movement that emerged in Europe in reaction to the horrors of World War One
prehistoric art
art of preliterate humans, roughly until 500 B.C.E.
Modernism
artistic movements of the late 19th and 20th centuries which challenged traditional representational art forms and developed new styles and forms
Harlem Renaissance
period of vibrant African-American cultural and intellectual life during the 1920s and 1930s, centered in New York City's Harlem neighborhood
stylized pictographs
stone paintings of the Neolithic period expressing artistic or religious meaning
Romanesque art
artwork of Europe which reflected Roman, Eastern, and Byzantine influences, from 10th to mid-12th century
Post-Modernism
art style which embraces an eclectic combination of all styles and periods in works of art and does not differentiate between high art and popular (or low) art, often mixing informal and formal elements
Minimalism
art movement of mid-20th century that emphasized a nonrepresentational style of sculpture and painting
Realism
art movement of second half of 19th century that emphasized objective portrayals of the world with a critique of the established social and political order; response to idealized Romantic art
ancient Mesopotamian art
artwork from successive civilizations found between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers (the Sumerians, Akkadians, Babylonians, and Assyrians), circa 9,000-500 B.C.E.
ancient Egyptian art
artwork from lower Nile Valley civilization, circa 5,000-1,350 B.C.E.
illuminated manuscript
text that is decorated with ornamental designs, miniatures, or lettering, often with gold leaf or silver
Corinthian order
the most decorative of the classical Greek architectural styles, featuring a fluted column shaft, capitals with flowers and leaves below a small scroll, and a large base; used more by the Romans
ancient Greek art
artwork from Classical Greece, circa 8,000-146 B.C.E.
microliths
small stone tools, usually made of flint or chert, from the Mesolithic period
Cubism
art movement of the early 20th century that represented a subject from multiple angles, using simplified geometric forms
Post-Impressionism
art movement of the early 20th century that while influenced by Impressionism emphasized a greater concern for expression, structure, form, and emotional response
Neoclassicism
art movement of 18th century that drew on Greek and Roman art for models of harmony, idealized realism, and reason
Pictorialism
a school of photography that employed soft focus, special filters and lens coatings, darkroom manipulation, and innovative printing processes to try to match the aesthetic effects of painting and printmaking
megaliths
large stone monuments of the Neolithic period (such as Stonehenge)
Renaissance
period in Western history, from the 14th through the 16th centuries, marked by a revival of interest in the culture of Greco-Roman antiquity and a flourishing of artistic and intellectual achievement
Rococo
late Baroque artistic style that was lighter and more playful and used ornate decoration, pastel colors, and asymmetrical arrangement of shell-like curves
Reformation art
art movement of the 16th century, largely in Northern Europe, that reflected religious views of Protestant Reformation
Venus figurines
Paleolithic art objects depicting women with exaggerated hips and breasts; thought to be portable fertility totems.
Expressionism
art movement of early 20th century that emphasized subjective feelings above objective observations and focused on conveying emotions
Romanticism
art movement of early 19th century that stressed passion, emotion, and exotic settings with dramatic action; response to rationalism of Neoclassicism
Bauhaus
German art and architectural style of early 20th century known for its simplicity, functionalism, and craftsmanship
Geometric Abstraction
art movement of the early 20th century that stressed the two-dimensionality of painting as observed subjects were converted into geometric shapes
cave paintings
Paleolithic paintings of scenes of hunting or fertility, found in caves in France, South Africa, and other regions.
Fauvism
art movement of the early 20th century that emphasized spontaneous, bold reactions to nature and employed vibrant, wild colors
Ionic order
classical Greek architectural style that features a fluted column shaft, capitals with volutes (spiral scroll-like ornaments) and a large base
Paleolithic art
art of the hunter-gatherer nomadic tribes of the Old Stone Age, circa 40,000-10,000 B.C.E
Doric order
the simplest of the classical Greek architectural styles, featuring unadorned columns with no base
ancient Persian art
artwork from a number of successive Persian civilizations (Achaemenian, Seleucid dynasty, Parthian, Sassanian), circa 3500-250 B.C.E.
Baroque art
art movement of the 17th and early 18th century supported by the Catholic Church that emphasized religious fervor, realism, and theatrical architecture
Mesolithic art
art of the Middle Stone Age, circa 10,000-8,000 B.C.E.
Pop Art
art movement of mid-20th century which emphasized existing popular images and cultural artifacts, often mimicking mass-produced consumer products
Surrealism
art movement of the early 20th century influenced by Freud's focus on dreams that assembled realistic forms in fantastical contexts
Gothic art
artwork of Central and Northern Europe which reflected Christian, and then secular, themes, from mid-12th to the 15th century
Impressionism
art movement of the late 19th - early 20th century that emphasized simplified composition and the effect of light and color to capture a painter's visual impression
Roman art
artwork produced by Roman civilization, circa 500 B.C.E.-476 C.E
Abstract Expressionism
art movement of mid-20th century that emphasized spontaneous and dramatic personal expression in large abstract paintings
Art Nouveau
art movement of the late 19th century - early 20th century that favored sinuous lines, curves, and organic motifs, such as plants and flowers
Dadaism
This work of art comes from which of the art movements
This is Great Ziggurat of Ur from Mesopotamia
This is the Great Sphinx at Giza
This is the Winged Victory of Samothrace
Name this Greek sculpture
This is the Parthenon on Acropolis
Name the structure:
This is Laocoön and His Sons
Name this Roman sculpture:
This is the Pantheon.
Name this Roman structure:
This is the Pisa Cathedral
Name this Romaneque structure:
This is Our Lady of Chartres.
Name this Gothic cathedral:
Albrecht Dürer
A categorized in Reformation Art
This is Piero della Francesca's Resurrection
Name this work of art:
This is Rembrandt van Rijn's The Abduction of Europa.
Name the creator of this Baroque work of art:
This is Judith Leyster's The Happy Couple.
Name the creator of this Baroque work of art:
This is Jean-Honoré Fragonard's The Captured Kiss.
Name the creator of this Rococo work of art
The Nightmare
by Johann Heinrich Fuseli
Name the creator of this Romantic work of art
his is Jacques-Louis David's Oath of the Horatii.
Name the creator of this Neoclassical work of art:
This is Gustave Courbet's Bonjour, Monsieur Courbet.
Name the creator of this Realist work of art:
This is Francisco de Goya's Portrait of the Family of Charles
Name the creator of this Romantic work of art
his is Two Women Throwing Flowers by Mary Cassatt.
Name the creator of this Impressionist work of art:
This is Claude Monet's Houses of Parliament.
Name the creator of this mpressionist work of art
This is Vincent Van Gogh's Sunflowers.
Name the creator of this Post-Impressionist work of art
This is André Derain's Portrait of a Man with a Newspaper, a work that is categorized as Fauvist.
This work of art comes from of the art movements?
This is Star Dancer on a Transatlantic Steamer by Francis Picabia.
This work of art comes from which of the art movements?
This is Pablo Picasso's Les Demoiselles d'Avignon (The Young Ladies of Avignon).
Name the creator of this work of art:
Judith Leyster's Self-Portrait
Baroque art period
Leonardo da Vinci's The Last Supper
the Renaissance time period
cathedral, Notre Dame de Paris.
Gothic structure
Michelangelo's David,
sculpture from the Renaissance
Filippo Brunelleschi's Santo Spirito Firenze
Structure from the Renaissance
Sir Christopher Wren's St Paul's Cathedral (London)
Structure from the Baroque period.
Rembrandt van Rijn's Self-Portrait
from the Baroque period of art.
Caravaggio's Supper at Emmaus
from the Baroque period of art.
Absinthe by Edgar Degas
image is an Impressionist work
The Death of Marat by Jacques-Louis David
from the Neoclassical period
Young Girl Reading by Jean-Honore Fragonard
an example of Rococo art.
Irises by by Vincent van Gogh
Post-Impressionist work of art
Portrait of Picasso by Juan Gris
Cubist work of art.
Picasso's Les Demoiselles d'Avignon (The Young Ladies of Avignon)
Cubist work of art.
Geometric Abstraction
This Modernist style of art stressed the two-dimensionality of painting and converted subjects into geometric shapes
religion and life after death
Ancient Egyptian art and architecture focused on:
Cubism
Pablo Picasso was the leading artist of ___________.
Realism
This art style sought to produce accurate and objective portrayals of the ordinary, observable world.
the 10th century to the middle of the 12th century
The Romanesque style of art and architecture dominated Europe from:
Abstract Expressionism
This Modernist style of art emphasized spontaneous personal expression in large abstract paintings.
imperial themes and power
Roman art and architecture dealt primarily with:
Art Nouveau
This style of art, architecture and design favored sinuous lines, curves, and motifs of plants and flowers.
Oil painting
This artistic medium was first introduced in the Renaissance.
Emotional and dramatic religiosity
_________________ was characteristic of Baroque art and architecture.
Romanticism
This nineteenth century style of art stressed passion, emotion, and exotic settings with dramatic action.
Rococo
This art style was was lighter and more playful than earlier Baroque art, using ornate decoration, pastel colors, and asymmetrical arrangement of shell-like curves.
Monet
Impressionism was named after a painting Impression, Sunrise by which French artist?
Andy Warhol
A well-known Pop Art painter was:
contextual criticism
Considering the facts and information about the artist, the culture and history involved, response to the artwork, etc. is called:
Sandro Botticelli's Birth of Venus
Please name this work of art a work from the Renaissance.
Our Lady of Chartres cathedral
Please name this work of art from th e Gothic period.
Reformation art
Praying Hands by Albrecht Dürer comes from which of the periods of art?
Rococo
Fragonard's A Young Girl Reading comes from which of the periods of art?
Neoclassicism period
acques-Louis David's The Death of Marat comes from which of the periods of art
Romanticism
Francisco de Goya's The Third of May 1808: The Execution of the Defenders of Madrid comes from which of the periods of art
Art Nouveau
Portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer by Gustav Klimt comes from which of the art movements?
Cubism
Portrait of Picasso by Juan Gris comes from which of the art movements?
Impressionism
Absinthe by Edgar Degas comes from which of the periods of art?

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