PPR Review Questions

Terms in this set (89)

For the units in her high school physics class, Ms. Galloway develops a series of experiments for students to work on independently at their own pace within a specified time frame. After each experiment, students turn in their lab notes and a detailed report, and Ms. Galloway notes any problems for students to review. Students determine how to improve and revise their work according to Ms. Galloway's feedback before they can move on to the next experiment. As the school year progresses, Ms. Galloway is very pleased with the overall improvement in her students' lab skills, scientific thinking, and writing skills. However, she feels overwhelmed by the amount of time she spends reviewing student work and maintaining student records. Ms. Galloway discusses the issue with her mentor teacher who helps her list the specific problems she is having, as shown below.

1. Too much class time gets wasted collecting and passing out student papers.

2. Too much time is spent sorting and matching lab notes and reports before they can be read.

3. Students sometimes misplace or lose part of their earlier sets of notes on a particular experiment, making it difficult to monitor their progress.

Ms. Galloway's system for noting problems with completed assignments will primarily benefit students by which of the following?


A. Enhancing students' awareness of the cognitive processes involved in problem solving and decision making
B. Encouraging students to apply teacher-directed methods to promote their own learning
C. Helping students understand relationships between specific content learned and broader learning goals
D. Developing students' sense of personal responsibility for their own achievement
For the units in her high school physics class, Ms. Galloway develops a series of experiments for students to work on independently at their own pace within a specified time frame. After each experiment, students turn in their lab notes and a detailed report, and Ms. Galloway notes any problems for students to review. Students determine how to improve and revise their work according to Ms. Galloway's feedback before they can move on to the next experiment. As the school year progresses, Ms. Galloway is very pleased with the overall improvement in her students' lab skills, scientific thinking, and writing skills. However, she feels overwhelmed by the amount of time she spends reviewing student work and maintaining student records. Ms. Galloway discusses the issue with her mentor teacher who helps her list the specific problems she is having, as shown below.

1. Too much class time gets wasted collecting and passing out student papers.

2. Too much time is spent sorting and matching lab notes and reports before they can be read.

3. Students sometimes misplace or lose part of their earlier sets of notes on a particular experiment, making it difficult to monitor their progress.

Ms. Galloway's discussion with her mentor teacher is effective primarily because it involves

A. Ms. Galloway and her mentor sharing personal experiences with similar situations.
B. Ms. Galloway and her mentor examining their personal philosophies of teaching.
C. a reflective process for Ms. Galloway to use to improve her instruction.
D. a review of proactive ideas for how Ms. Galloway can avoid future problems.
For the units in her high school physics class, Ms. Galloway develops a series of experiments for students to work on independently at their own pace within a specified time frame. After each experiment, students turn in their lab notes and a detailed report, and Ms. Galloway notes any problems for students to review. Students determine how to improve and revise their work according to Ms. Galloway's feedback before they can move on to the next experiment. As the school year progresses, Ms. Galloway is very pleased with the overall improvement in her students' lab skills, scientific thinking, and writing skills. However, she feels overwhelmed by the amount of time she spends reviewing student work and maintaining student records. Ms. Galloway discusses the issue with her mentor teacher who helps her list the specific problems she is having, as shown below.

1. Too much class time gets wasted collecting and passing out student papers.

2. Too much time is spent sorting and matching lab notes and reports before they can be read.

3. Students sometimes misplace or lose part of their earlier sets of notes on a particular experiment, making it difficult to monitor their progress.

To best help Ms. Galloway identify potential solutions for the listed problems, the mentor should suggest that Ms. Galloway

A. initiate a personal blog of classroom management teaching experiences.
B. chat with an online community of teachers about managing materials.
C. join a professional educational association that focuses on classroom management.
D. review research-based educational articles about managing materials.
Mr. Wylie, a seventh-grade Texas history teacher, is planning a unit to help his students understand the structure and functions of government as created by the Texas Constitution. To address the objective, he plans to have pairs of students work together to interview a city official. He gives students the following handout that provides a timeline of activities for student pairs to perform during the project.

Straight From the Source: Learning About Our City Government

Day 1

Brainstorm a list of ten to fifteen possible questions to ask a city official to help you learn how the Texas Constitution affects decisions that city officials make every day. The questions should elicit a variety of answers.

Day 2

Share your list of potential questions in small groups to get feedback. Revise your questions.

Day 3

Practice your interview using role-playing with at least two different members of the class (other than your partner). Take turns as the interviewer, asking your questions and taking notes.

Day 4

Use your experiences from Day 3 to reflect on the quality and scope of your questions.
Refine your list of questions based on your reflection.

Day 5

Conduct yourself appropriately during the interview and take good notes.
Write a summary of the information you learned from your interview.

Day 6

Make a brief oral presentation to the class to share what you learned.

PART 2

In preparing for the interviews, Mr. Wylie develops a list of officials who have an office in the city hall building. Then he contacts the officials to determine if they are interested in the project and their availability for interviews.

The project design primarily demonstrates Mr. Wylie's understanding of the importance of

A. establishing an environment that respects diversity.
B. helping students make potential career decisions.
C. monitoring teacher effectiveness during instruction.
D. connecting students' learning to the real world.
Mr. Wylie, a seventh-grade Texas history teacher, is planning a unit to help his students understand the structure and functions of government as created by the Texas Constitution. To address the objective, he plans to have pairs of students work together to interview a city official. He gives students the following handout that provides a timeline of activities for student pairs to perform during the project.

Straight From the Source: Learning About Our City Government

Day 1

Brainstorm a list of ten to fifteen possible questions to ask a city official to help you learn how the Texas Constitution affects decisions that city officials make every day. The questions should elicit a variety of answers.

Day 2

Share your list of potential questions in small groups to get feedback. Revise your questions.

Day 3

Practice your interview using role-playing with at least two different members of the class (other than your partner). Take turns as the interviewer, asking your questions and taking notes.

Day 4

Use your experiences from Day 3 to reflect on the quality and scope of your questions.
Refine your list of questions based on your reflection.

Day 5

Conduct yourself appropriately during the interview and take good notes.
Write a summary of the information you learned from your interview.

Day 6

Make a brief oral presentation to the class to share what you learned.

PART 2

In preparing for the interviews, Mr. Wylie develops a list of officials who have an office in the city hall building. Then he contacts the officials to determine if they are interested in the project and their availability for interviews.

Which of the following is a primary purpose of providing the handout?

A. Clarifying expectations of the students regarding the learning activities
B. Differentiating instruction for the learning activities for students of multiple ability levels
C. Involving the students in creating an assessment for the learning activities
D. Increasing students' ownership by providing a choice of learning activities
Mr. Wylie, a seventh-grade Texas history teacher, is planning a unit to help his students understand the structure and functions of government as created by the Texas Constitution. To address the objective, he plans to have pairs of students work together to interview a city official. He gives students the following handout that provides a timeline of activities for student pairs to perform during the project.

Straight From the Source: Learning About Our City Government

Day 1

Brainstorm a list of ten to fifteen possible questions to ask a city official to help you learn how the Texas Constitution affects decisions that city officials make every day. The questions should elicit a variety of answers.

Day 2

Share your list of potential questions in small groups to get feedback. Revise your questions.

Day 3

Practice your interview using role-playing with at least two different members of the class (other than your partner). Take turns as the interviewer, asking your questions and taking notes.

Day 4

Use your experiences from Day 3 to reflect on the quality and scope of your questions.
Refine your list of questions based on your reflection.

Day 5

Conduct yourself appropriately during the interview and take good notes.
Write a summary of the information you learned from your interview.

Day 6

Make a brief oral presentation to the class to share what you learned.

PART 2

In preparing for the interviews, Mr. Wylie develops a list of officials who have an office in the city hall building. Then he contacts the officials to determine if they are interested in the project and their availability for interviews.

To best help students accomplish their task on Day 4, Mr. Wylie should provide them with a

A. semantic map.
B. sample script.
C. performance rubric.
D. behavior checklist.
Mr. Wylie, a seventh-grade Texas history teacher, is planning a unit to help his students understand the structure and functions of government as created by the Texas Constitution. To address the objective, he plans to have pairs of students work together to interview a city official. He gives students the following handout that provides a timeline of activities for student pairs to perform during the project.

Straight From the Source: Learning About Our City Government

Day 1

Brainstorm a list of ten to fifteen possible questions to ask a city official to help you learn how the Texas Constitution affects decisions that city officials make every day. The questions should elicit a variety of answers.

Day 2

Share your list of potential questions in small groups to get feedback. Revise your questions.

Day 3

Practice your interview using role-playing with at least two different members of the class (other than your partner). Take turns as the interviewer, asking your questions and taking notes.

Day 4

Use your experiences from Day 3 to reflect on the quality and scope of your questions.
Refine your list of questions based on your reflection.

Day 5

Conduct yourself appropriately during the interview and take good notes.
Write a summary of the information you learned from your interview.

Day 6

Make a brief oral presentation to the class to share what you learned.

PART 2

In preparing for the interviews, Mr. Wylie develops a list of officials who have an office in the city hall building. Then he contacts the officials to determine if they are interested in the project and their availability for interviews.

Before arranging for his students to leave the school grounds for the project on Day 5, it is most important for Mr. Wylie to

A. notify the students' other teachers in writing.
B. create a trip schedule to present parents with procedures to ensure students' safety.
C. obtain a consent form signed by a parent from each student.
D. provide information to each student about their legal rights with regard to the trip.
Mr. Wylie, a seventh-grade Texas history teacher, is planning a unit to help his students understand the structure and functions of government as created by the Texas Constitution. To address the objective, he plans to have pairs of students work together to interview a city official. He gives students the following handout that provides a timeline of activities for student pairs to perform during the project.

Straight From the Source: Learning About Our City Government

Day 1

Brainstorm a list of ten to fifteen possible questions to ask a city official to help you learn how the Texas Constitution affects decisions that city officials make every day. The questions should elicit a variety of answers.

Day 2

Share your list of potential questions in small groups to get feedback. Revise your questions.

Day 3

Practice your interview using role-playing with at least two different members of the class (other than your partner). Take turns as the interviewer, asking your questions and taking notes.

Day 4

Use your experiences from Day 3 to reflect on the quality and scope of your questions.
Refine your list of questions based on your reflection.

Day 5

Conduct yourself appropriately during the interview and take good notes.
Write a summary of the information you learned from your interview.

Day 6

Make a brief oral presentation to the class to share what you learned.

PART 2

In preparing for the interviews, Mr. Wylie develops a list of officials who have an office in the city hall building. Then he contacts the officials to determine if they are interested in the project and their availability for interviews.

The project develops students' higher-order thinking skills primarily by promoting which of the following?

A. Problem solving
B. Inquiry learning
C. Community involvement
D. Multisensory learning
Mr. Wylie, a seventh-grade Texas history teacher, is planning a unit to help his students understand the structure and functions of government as created by the Texas Constitution. To address the objective, he plans to have pairs of students work together to interview a city official. He gives students the following handout that provides a timeline of activities for student pairs to perform during the project.

Straight From the Source: Learning About Our City Government

Day 1

Brainstorm a list of ten to fifteen possible questions to ask a city official to help you learn how the Texas Constitution affects decisions that city officials make every day. The questions should elicit a variety of answers.

Day 2

Share your list of potential questions in small groups to get feedback. Revise your questions.

Day 3

Practice your interview using role-playing with at least two different members of the class (other than your partner). Take turns as the interviewer, asking your questions and taking notes.

Day 4

Use your experiences from Day 3 to reflect on the quality and scope of your questions.
Refine your list of questions based on your reflection.

Day 5

Conduct yourself appropriately during the interview and take good notes.
Write a summary of the information you learned from your interview.

Day 6

Make a brief oral presentation to the class to share what you learned.

PART 2

In preparing for the interviews, Mr. Wylie develops a list of officials who have an office in the city hall building. Then he contacts the officials to determine if they are interested in the project and their availability for interviews.

A primary benefit of creating the list of people to interview is that it will facilitate

A. scheduling to maximize learning opportunities.
B. planning experiences for students to practice problem solving.
C. sequencing of learning activities in a logical way.
D. improving students' understanding of the unit's content material.
Mr. Wylie, a seventh-grade Texas history teacher, is planning a unit to help his students understand the structure and functions of government as created by the Texas Constitution. To address the objective, he plans to have pairs of students work together to interview a city official. He gives students the following handout that provides a timeline of activities for student pairs to perform during the project.

Straight From the Source: Learning About Our City Government

Day 1

Brainstorm a list of ten to fifteen possible questions to ask a city official to help you learn how the Texas Constitution affects decisions that city officials make every day. The questions should elicit a variety of answers.

Day 2

Share your list of potential questions in small groups to get feedback. Revise your questions.

Day 3

Practice your interview using role-playing with at least two different members of the class (other than your partner). Take turns as the interviewer, asking your questions and taking notes.

Day 4

Use your experiences from Day 3 to reflect on the quality and scope of your questions.
Refine your list of questions based on your reflection.

Day 5

Conduct yourself appropriately during the interview and take good notes.
Write a summary of the information you learned from your interview.

Day 6

Make a brief oral presentation to the class to share what you learned.

PART 2

In preparing for the interviews, Mr. Wylie develops a list of officials who have an office in the city hall building. Then he contacts the officials to determine if they are interested in the project and their availability for interviews.

To best help officials understand the expectations for the interviews, it is most important for Mr. Wylie to explain the

A. question-and-answer format the students will use during the students' interviews.
B. students' learning objectives to be achieved for the unit.
C. lesson format that will be followed after the students' interviews.
D. students' varied learning preferences for the unit.
Mr. Wylie, a seventh-grade Texas history teacher, is planning a unit to help his students understand the structure and functions of government as created by the Texas Constitution. To address the objective, he plans to have pairs of students work together to interview a city official. He gives students the following handout that provides a timeline of activities for student pairs to perform during the project.

Straight From the Source: Learning About Our City Government

Day 1

Brainstorm a list of ten to fifteen possible questions to ask a city official to help you learn how the Texas Constitution affects decisions that city officials make every day. The questions should elicit a variety of answers.

Day 2

Share your list of potential questions in small groups to get feedback. Revise your questions.

Day 3

Practice your interview using role-playing with at least two different members of the class (other than your partner). Take turns as the interviewer, asking your questions and taking notes.

Day 4

Use your experiences from Day 3 to reflect on the quality and scope of your questions.
Refine your list of questions based on your reflection.

Day 5

Conduct yourself appropriately during the interview and take good notes.
Write a summary of the information you learned from your interview.

Day 6

Make a brief oral presentation to the class to share what you learned.

PART 2

In preparing for the interviews, Mr. Wylie develops a list of officials who have an office in the city hall building. Then he contacts the officials to determine if they are interested in the project and their availability for interviews.

Which of the following best describes Mr. Wylie's role during the interview day?

A. Content specialist
B. Facilitator
C. Interview director
D. Evaluator
Before students begin their research, Ms. Soto posts the broad mathematics goal on the chalkboard. The following is the class discussion.

Ms. Soto:

OK, I have written the mathematics goal on the board, "To practice estimation skills." We completed an estimation unit about a week ago. We used a jar of jelly beans to start out the unit... does anyone remember what estimating is in measurement?

Corey:

It's when you figure how much something weighs or how many things there are, or something like that. I mean, not exactly how much, but around how much.

Ms. Soto:

Yes, that's correct. You give an educated guess. We estimated how many jelly beans were in a jar based on the size of the jar and the size of the jelly beans. Now, for our research, we are going to use estimation to help others understand the size of the animal based on things that we already know. For example, let's look at this science textbook. We don't know how much it weighs, but what can you tell me about its weight? [No one volunteers to answer the question.] Well, let's see, is the textbook heavier or lighter than this magazine?

Several students:

Heavier!

Ms. Soto:

Good! Now what's another question you could ask to help us estimate its weight?

Amanda:

You could ask if it's heavier or lighter than a student dictionary, and it's lighter.

[The conversation continues, and students practice estimating the relative heights and volumes of different objects.]

Ms. Soto:

So for each of the endangered animals you research, you will be responsible for helping us understand its height and weight in terms of estimation based on things that we already know. For example, an African elephant can weigh more than four tons and stand twelve feet tall. In terms that we can understand, that's the weight of three average-sized cars and the height of a tall man standing on the shoulders of another tall man.

Ms. Soto mentions the jelly bean activity primarily to do which of the following?

A. Connect ideas to prior knowledge
B. Relate the project to real life
C. Stimulate critical thinking
D. Encourage visual learners
Before students begin their research, Ms. Soto posts the broad mathematics goal on the chalkboard. The following is the class discussion.

Ms. Soto:

OK, I have written the mathematics goal on the board, "To practice estimation skills." We completed an estimation unit about a week ago. We used a jar of jelly beans to start out the unit... does anyone remember what estimating is in measurement?

Corey:

It's when you figure how much something weighs or how many things there are, or something like that. I mean, not exactly how much, but around how much.

Ms. Soto:

Yes, that's correct. You give an educated guess. We estimated how many jelly beans were in a jar based on the size of the jar and the size of the jelly beans. Now, for our research, we are going to use estimation to help others understand the size of the animal based on things that we already know. For example, let's look at this science textbook. We don't know how much it weighs, but what can you tell me about its weight? [No one volunteers to answer the question.] Well, let's see, is the textbook heavier or lighter than this magazine?

Several students:

Heavier!

Ms. Soto:

Good! Now what's another question you could ask to help us estimate its weight?

Ms. Soto:

Good! Now what's another question you could ask to help us estimate its weight?

Amanda:

You could ask if it's heavier or lighter than a student dictionary, and it's lighter.

[The conversation continues, and students practice estimating the relative heights and volumes of different objects.]

Ms. Soto:

So for each of the endangered animals you research, you will be responsible for helping us understand its height and weight in terms of estimation based on things that we already know. For example, an African elephant can weigh more than four tons and stand twelve feet tall. In terms that we can understand, that's the weight of three average-sized cars and the height of a tall man standing on the shoulders of another tall man.

Which of the following excerpts from the discussion best indicates that Ms. Soto adjusted instruction based on students' needs?

A. Yes, that's correct. You give an educated guess.
B. ...but what can you tell me about its weight?
C. ...we are going to use estimation to help others understand...
D. ...is the textbook heavier or lighter than this magazine?
;