Unit 9: Civil Rights

Terms in this set (38)

African Americans: Years of boycotts, sit-ins, and other nonviolent protests led by Dr. Martin Luther
King, Jr., inspired the March on Washington. The march was planned to pressure Congress to pass
civil rights legislation. King's "I Have a Dream" speech, the crowd of over 200,000 nonviolent
demonstrations, influenced public opinion toward favoring civil rights legislation. For all their
progress, many African Americans were prevented from voting in the South. The Voting Rights Act
of 195 outlawed literacy tests and allowed the federal government to oversee voter registration.
Along with the 24th Amendment, outlawing the poll tax, the act caused African American voter
registration to increase dramatically. Women: Women's rights groups became active and vocal in
the early 1960s. Women used a variety of nonviolent methods to gain support for women's issues.
They held marches and rallies, lobbied government officials, and used the legal system. Native
Americans: The Red Power movement gained public attention as a response the termination policy.
Termination was the government's place to develop "independence" for Native Americans by
withdraw assistance like health care. 700 Native Americans representing 64 Native American
nations met in Chicago to oppose the termination movement. The Red Power movement became
violent at times: 1969 occupation of Alcatraz Island; 1972 takeover of the Bureau of Indian Affairs
headquarters; and, the 1973 standoff with Federal Marshalls at Wounded Knee in South Dakota.
Hispanics: Hispanic workers became more vocal in their demands for better pay. Cesar Chavez and
the National Farm Workers Association drew attention to their cause by striking in front of grocery
stores. The Chicano movement became active, which was similar to Black Power, worked to instill
ethnic pride.
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