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5 Written questions

5 Matching questions

  1. Causal Relationship
  2. Point of View
  3. Attitude
  4. Equivocation
  5. Annotation
  1. a In __, a writer asserts that one thing results from another. To show how one thing produces or brings about another is often relevant in establishing a logical argument.
  2. b When a writer uses the same term in two different senses in an argument.
  3. c explanatory notes added to a text to explain, cite sources, or give bibliographical data.
  4. d In literature, the perspective from which a story is told.
  5. e the relationship an author has toward his or her subject, and/or his or her audience

5 Multiple choice questions

  1. Support or evidence for a claim in an argument
  2. In this type of irony, facts or events are unknown to a character in a play or a piece of fiction but known to the reader, audience, or other characters in the work
  3. Sentence which begins with the main idea and then expands on that idea with a series of details or other particulars
  4. A sentence that presents its central meaning in a main clause at the end. The independent clause is preceded by a phrase or clause that cannot stand alone. The effect is to add emphasis and structural variety.
  5. Often called circular reasoning, __ occurs when the believability of the evidence depends on the believability of the claim.

5 True/False questions

  1. Voicecan refer to two different areas of writing. One refers to the relationship between a sentence's subject and verb (active and passive). The second refers to the total "sound" of the writer's style.

          

  2. Expositiona word or phrase that links one idea to the next and carries the reader from sentence to sentence, paragraph to paragraph.

          

  3. InferTo draw a reasonable conclusion from the information presented.

          

  4. Tonecan refer to two different areas of writing. One refers to the relationship between a sentence's subject and verb (active and passive). The second refers to the total "sound" of the writer's style.

          

  5. Onomatopoeiaa figure of speech in which natural sounds are imitated in the sounds of words. Simple examples include such words as buzz, hiss, hum.