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5 Written questions

5 Matching questions

  1. Situational Irony
  2. Argumentation
  3. Narrative
  4. Syntax
  5. Personification
  1. a The assigning of human qualities to inanimate objects or concepts. An example: Wordsworth's "the sea that bares her bosom to the moon."
  2. b The telling of a story or an account of an event or series of events.
  3. c The grammatical structure of prose and poetry.
  4. d The purpose of this rhetorical mode is to prove the validity of an idea, or point of view, by presenting sound reasoning, discussion, and argument that thoroughly convince the reader.
  5. e a type of irony in which events turn out the opposite of what was expected.

5 Multiple choice questions

  1. explanatory notes added to a text to explain, cite sources, or give bibliographical data.
  2. from the Greek for "orator," this term describes the principle governing the art of writing effectively, eloquently, and persuasively.
  3. In this type of irony, the words literally state the opposite of the writer's true meaning
  4. The repetition of initial consonant sounds, such as "Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers."
  5. a critical approach that debunks single definitions of meaning based on the instability of language. It "is not a dismantling of a structure of a text, but a demonstration that it has already dismantled itself."

5 True/False questions

  1. Ethosan appeal based on the character of the speaker. An __-driven document relies on the reputation of the author.

          

  2. ColloquialFrom the Greek for "reckoning together," a __ is a deductive system of formal logic that presents two premises that inevitably lead to a sound conclusion.

          

  3. ArgumentA single assertion or a series of assertions presented and defended by the writer

          

  4. Third Person OmniscientIn ___, the narrator, with a godlike knowledge, presents the thoughts and actions of any or all characters.

          

  5. Periodic SentenceThe assigning of human qualities to inanimate objects or concepts. An example: Wordsworth's "the sea that bares her bosom to the moon."