How can we help?

You can also find more resources in our Help Center.

52 terms

Music 100: Final

20th Century and Beyond
STUDY
PLAY
The Rite of Spring
Igor Stravinski
Appalachian Spring
Aaron Copland
A Survivor from Warsaw
Arnold Schoenberg
Prelude to "The Afternoon of a Faun"
Claude Debussy
West Side Story
Leonard Bernstein
Putnam's Camp, Redding, Connecticut
Charles Ives
Concerto Grosso 1985
Ellen Taaffe Zwilich
Afro-American Symphony
William Grant Still
Pierrot Lunaire
Arnold Schoenberg
Wozzeck
Alban Berg
Concerto for Orchestra
Bela Bartok
Rhapsody in Blue
George Gershwin
Polychord
Placing one traditional chord against another at the same time, a technique of twentieth-century music
Atonality
The complete rejection of a tonal center, or treating each of the twelve tones as of equal importance
Chorus
The main section of a musical comedy song
Polytonality
The technique of using two or more tonal centers at the same time
Ostinato
a motive or phrase that is repeated persistently at the same pitch throughout a section
Expressionism
artistic movement, centered in Germany and Austria from 1905 to 1925, that stressed intense, subjective emotion
Impressionism
artistic movement, centered in France in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, that stressed atmosphere, fluidity, and color
Minimalism
music characterized by its steady pulse, clear tonality, and insistent repetition of short melodic fragements
Neoclassicism
artistic movement from about 1920 to 1950 that is marked by emotional restraint, balance, and clarity
Primitivism
deliberate evocation of unsophisticated power through insistent rhythms and percussive sounds
Serialism
use of the technique of the twelve-tone system to organize rhythm, dynamics, and tone color
bebop
Style that evolved in the early 1940's, characterized by complex rhythmic patterns, asymmetrical melodic phrases, solo improvisation, and irregular accents
blues
form of vocal music usually characterized by a 12-bar chord progression over a steady 4/4 beat
cool jazz
style that emerged in the early 1950s that was related to bop but calmer and more relaxed in character
country and western
folklike, guitar-based style associated with rural white Americans
free jazz
style that emerged in the early 1960s that was not based on regular forms or established chord patterns
fusion
combination of jazz improvisation with rock rhythms and tone colors
motown
blend of rhythm and blues with popular music
New Orleans Style
style developed in the early 1900s, characterized by collective improvisation of solo performers over a clearly marked beat
Ragtime
piano style generally in duple meter, performed at a moderate mark tempo, popular from the 1890s to about 1915
rhythm and blues
dance music of African Americans that fused blues, jazz, and gospel styles
rock
vocal music with a hard, driving beat, often featuring electric guitar accompaniment and heavily amplified sound
soul
emphasis on emotionality, gospel roots, and its relationship to the black community
swing
style popular from 1935 to 1945, characterized by arrangements for about fifteen musicians
subdominant
the chord progression usually used in the blues involves only three basic chords; tonic, dominant, ________
Riffs
Frequently repeated short melodic phrases commonly used in swing
Bebop
Charlie "Bird" Parker,Dizzy Gillespie, Thelonious Monk
Blues
Bessie Smith, W.C. Handy
Cool Jazz
Miles Davis, Lester Young
Disco
Donna Summer
Folk Rock
Bob Dylan
Free Jazz
Ornette Coleman
Motown
Diana Ross and the Supremes, Stevie Wonder
New Orleans Style
Louis Armstrong, Joseph "King" Oliver
Ragtime
Scott Joplin
Rap
Ice Cube,
Rhythm and Blues
Chuck Berry
1950s rock
Elvis Presley
Soul
Ray Charles,Arethra Franklin
Swing
Duke Ellington, Benny Goodman, Ella Fitzgerald, Glenn Miller