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62 terms

Rocky Presbytery Examination in Theology

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What are the two kinds of revelation? How are they distinct? How does each relate to salvation?
General revelation (ps. 19; Rom1:18-23;Acts 17) is a revelation of God through creation. Man looks at creation and realizes that there is a God and that they are accountable to him. This revelation though cannot save man, but only make him accountable for his sin.

Special revelation is God's revelation through his word that is breathed by his spirit and is profitable for teaching, reproof, correction and for training in Righteousness (2 Tim. 3:16). This revelation is for us and our children (duet 29:29). It reveals to us all our spiritual benefits (justification, sanctification) (Rom. 8) we have from God and how we must be saved (eph 2:8-9; rom 10:9). Both revelations are a revelation of God.
2. What basic principles of interpretation does the Westminster Confession of Faith affirms?
The analogy of faith is that scripture interprets scripture (Heb. 1:1-2; Luke 24:25,27;32).
3. Define, distinguish and defend the doctrines of the inerrancy and infallibility of Scripture.
Inerrancy is a doctrine that declares that God's scripture are without error in the original autographs.

Infallibility states that God's word has no ability in its nature to be fallible. This is true, because God cannot lie (Num 23:19) and he can not be mistaken (Heb 4:13). The word of God is breathed by him (2 Tim 3:16), So then his words cannot lie or be mistaken. Which makes it trustworthy and authoritative.
1.What are the two kinds of revelation? How are they distinct? How does each relate to salvation?
General revelation (ps. 19; Rom1:18-23;Acts 17) is a revelation of God through creation. Man looks at creation and realizes that there is a God and that they are accountable to him. This revelation though cannot save man, but only make him accountable for his sin. Special revelation is God's revelation through his word that is breathed by his spirit and is profitable for teaching, reproof, correction and for training in Righteousness (2 Tim. 3:16). This revelation is for us and our children (duet 29:29). It reveals to us all our spiritual benefits (justification, sanctification) (Rom. 8) we have from God and how we must be saved (eph 2:8-9; rom 10:9). Both revelations are a revelation of God.
2. What basic principles of interpretation does the Westminster Confession of Faith affirms?
The analogy of faith is that scripture interprets scripture (Heb. 1:1-2; Luke 24:2527;32).
3. Define distinguish and defend the doctrines of the inerrancy and infallibility of Scripture.
Inerrancy is a doctrine that declares that God's scripture are without error in the original autographs. Infallibility states that God's word has no ability in its nature to be fallible. This is true, because God cannot lie (Num 23:19) and he can not be mistaken (Heb 4:13). The word of God is breathed by him (2 Tim 3:16), So then his words cannot lie or be mistaken. Which makes it trustworthy and authoritative.
4. From where comes our full persuasion and assurance of the infallible truth and divine authority of Scripture? WCF 1. Why is this so?
It comes from God himself who is our only assurance of infallible truth and divine authority, which he aluminates to us by his spirit (1 Cor 2:10-14; Duet 29:29). Why this is true and has to be so, is if there where any other assurance other than God. Then God would not be the ground of ultimate authority of infallible truth.
5. In what sense has "revelation ceased"?
Special revelation, being God's word (Gen-Rev /66 books of the Bible) as we see it is canonized. It cannot be added or taken away. The Idea of cannon is from scripture itself, where scripture states that it should not have anything added or taken away from it (Duet 4:2; Rev. 22:18-19). Also Scripture has told us that God has spoken to us through prophets, but now only through Christ (Heb 1:1-2). The cannon has closed after the apostles died, because they were the one's who Christ taught and granted to them a special authority (Matt 28:16-20; Acts 2).
6. Distinguish between revelation and illumination?
Revelation speaks to authorship of scripture (2 Tim. 3:16) and illumination speaks to God allowing us to understand his scripture (1 Cor. 2:10-14).
7. What is God?
God is spirit, infinite and eternal in his being, wisdom, power, holiness, justice, goodness and truth (Num. 23:19; Heb 4:13; Dan. 4:23-24; Ex. 34).
8. Define the following attributes of God and give biblical warrant:
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a. Aseity:
God exists in him self (Gen 1:1; Dan 3: 34-35; Jn. 1:1-3)
b. Immutability:
God does not Change (Num. 23:19: Dan. 3:35)
c. Impassibility:
God's decrees are not driven by his emotions, but only by the counsel of his will (Eph. 1:4; Num. 23:19)
d. Holiness:
God is holy in all his being (Lev 19:2)
e. Foreknowledge:
God knows all things (Eph. 1:4; Rom 8-9; Heb 4:13)
9. What is meant by the phrase: "And God repented/relented"? (Ex. 32.14; Amos 7.3).
This an "anthropomorphic" phrase. It explains to us in human terms that God chose to show mercy and compassion in a way that we would understand. However, it does not mean God changes his mind literally.
10. What is meant by God's "two wills"?
God's two wills are his revealed will and secret will. His revelaed will is for us and our children to do what is commanded in this life (Duet. 29:29; 2 Tim. 3:16-17). His secret will is only for him and we do not know it (Duet 29:29).
11. Describe God's foreordination of all things in relationship to man's will.
God's decrees all things and nothing changes his will (Dan 4:34-35). While this is true, man is still culpable for his decisions (Acts 2:23).
12. Defend that God is one.
God is one essence, because his words claims it to be so (Deut. 6:4; Jn. 10:30).
13. Defend Christ's deity in terms of Scripture ascribing to him the names
attributes, works and worship as are proper to God alone., Christ is called the "son of man" in the gospels (Matt 9:1-8) which is a title of the messiah who has divine powers in Daniel chapter 7. He created the world, which is only something God can do (Jn. 1:1; Col. 1:15-19). He is also called the "son of God" and "Christ/ messiah" (Matt 16:16). He does only things that God can do like forgiving sins (Matt. 9:1-8). Scripture claims him to be God (Phil. 2:6; Col. 2:9; Jn. 1:1). Christ even has called himself God and that he is one with God the father (Matt 9:1-8; Jn. 8:54-58; 10:30).
14. Defend the personhood of the Holy Spirit.
The Holy spirit is called God (acts 5:9) and is named with the Godhead (Matt. 28). He works in the elect, by bringing to fruition and applies all the spiritual benefits that were granted to the elect by the father (Eph 1: 13-14; Jn. 14:26; 15:26; 16). He aluminates what we need to know about God (1 Cor 2:10-14) and he intercedes for us (Rom. 8:26). He also anointed Christ to do what he need to accomplish for God the father's will (Matt 3:16; 4:1).
15. What are the personal properties of each person of the Godhead?
God the father decree's ( Dan 4:34-35; Eph 1:1-4). The son is the eternal begotten son of the father, begotten not made (Jn 1:1,14; Heb 1:5; Ps. 2). The Spirit proceeds from the father and the son (Jn. 15:26-27).
16. What is the doctrine of Creation? Contrast with "naturalism and pantheism."
God is the one who creates all things out of nothing (Gen 1:1; Jn. 1:1; Col 1:15-19). This means creation is a product of God not an essence of God. Naturalism says that creation was a work of creation and pantheism says that creation is god.
17. What is the doctrine of Providence? Contrast with "naturalism and fatalism."
Providence is God's holy wise, powerful and preserving every creature and every action (Dan 4:34-35; Eph. 1:4). Naturalism speaks to everything being random, because everything is made by a random cause with no divine being behind it. Fatalism believes that there is a God, but he has fixed everything where we are not free to do anything. The scripture deny this because God is fully sovereign all the will allowing us to be culpable for our actions (acts 2:23).
18. What is "the image of God"?
"The image of God," is an imprinting of God and his character on us, which means we bear a resemblance of him and his attributes (Gen 1:26-27). Also it makes us unique and separated from all creation.
19. Discuss constitutional nature of man in terms of Dichotomy and Trichotomy. Defend your own view.
Dichotomy and Trichotomy are doctrines that explains that man consists of three or two parts. Body, soul, and Spirit (Trichotomy) or Body and soul (Dichotomy). If I had to choose I would lean with Dichonotomy. I believe scripture uses soul and spirit interchangeably.
20. Define and defend the imputation of Adam's sin to all his posterity. Contrast with the Pelagian view.
Adam was our federal head in the covenant of works and failed (Gen 1-3; Hosea 6:7). Since that time all mankind are imputed with Adam's guilt and are accountable to God's Judgment (Rom. 5:12-14; 1 cor. 15). Because of this imputed guilt. Man's nature is corrupted in all he thinks and does (gen 6:5). Even the good things he does are tainted by Adam's guilt (Isa 64:6). The Pelagian views man nature is not corrupted, but the environment around him that is corrupted (because sin entered the world). By this man can live a life with out sinning (because he is born with a blank slate). But it is hard, because of the influence of a sinful world can makes man corrupted if he chooses to let it.
21. What is the "covenant of grace"? When and how is it differently administered?
The covenant of grace is God's gracious response to Adam's failure in the covenant of works. By God promising a champion (Gen 3:15). This champion Jesus Christ, the redeemer of God's elect is the second Adam that brings in life, where the first Adam brought in death (1 Cor. 15). Christ still lives a life under the law that Adam was under, but accomplishes what Adam could not do. God did this because he knew all mankind could not save himself through the law, because he was corrupted by Adam. We who are now in Christ are saved by grace through faith. It is not of our own doing through the works of the law, but only by Christ (Eph. 2:8-9; Gal. 2:16,21; 1 cor. 5:21).
22. How was the covenant of grace administered "in the time of the law" and "under the gospel"?
Both are saved by faith. The Old Testament period was by faith in Christ to come through types and shadows (tabernacle/ Sacrificial lamb / offerings) (Heb. 11; Luke 24: 25,27). Now in the New Testament period we look a back at what Christ has done live by faith (Eph. 2: 8-9).
23. Why did the Messiah need to be fully God?
Only God can provide a perfect sacrifice to atone for our sins (Heb 9:11-14; Jn. 1:29; Is. 52:13-53:12; Cor. 5:21; Heb 4:15).
24. Why did the Messiah need to become fully human?
Only man can be a substitute for man (Rom. 5:19).
25. Define and defend Christ's active and passive obedience.
Christ active obedience was actively obeying the law of God (Heb 4:15). Passive Obedience is where Christ allowed himself to suffer in the miseries of this life, being born under the law of God and dying on the cross (Matt 26:42; Jn. 10:11)
26. Define and Defend Christ's atonement as propitiation sacrifice reconciliation and redemption.
Christ life and death appeased God's wrath as a perfect propitiation (rom 3:23-26). He death was a perfect sacrifice that the blood of bulls and goats could not accomplish (Heb 9: 11-14). Christ atonement redeems us and reconciles us to God by mending the broken relationship we had with God. So that we are no longer alienated from God but are his children (2 cor. 6:11-21; eph. 2:13-21).
27. What is the relationship between the substitutionary nature of the atonement and the extent of the atonement?
Substitutionary atonement is where Christ died in our place (Rom 3:23-28; 2 Cor. 5:21; Heb 9:11-14). The extent of the atonement is that Christ only died for the elect (John 1:12-13; 6:44,46; 8:47 10:14-15; Rom. 9)
28. What biblical texts do Arminians use to argue against limited atonement? Take one and give a Reformed defense.
They see passages like John 3:16 where is speaks of the "world" and they think it saying the extent of the atonement is offered to all the world. This can be explained that Christ came to die not just for the Jews, but also for all people. This is speaking on category not he extent of the atonement.
29. What is the Reformed "ordo salutis"? Contrast it with the Arminian "ordo."
The Arminian "ordo" puts faith before effectual calling and regeneration of the Reformed "Ordo salutis." Where the Reformed "Ordo salutis" puts faith after effectual calling and regeneration.
30. What is "unconditional election"?
There is no condition why we are saved. We were not lovely or desirable for God to save us, but he freely chose to be merciful to us (1 Jn. 4:10; Rom 9; Eph. 2:8-9).
31. What is "irresistible grace"?
We cannot deny God's effectual calling on us for our election and salvation (rom 8 & 9; Ezek. 36).
32. What is the "perseverance of the saints?"
The elect will truly persevere in this life unto their last breath, because of the grace of God calling them (Eph 1:13-14; Jn. 10; Rom 8).
33. What is justification by faith?
Justification is an act of God's free Grace whereby we are pardoned of our sin and excepted righteous in his sight only for the righteousness of Christ imputed to us and received by faith alone (Phil 3:9-11; Is. 52:13-53:13; Rom. 3: 23-26).
34. What is sanctification?
Sanctification is a work of God's free Grace whereby we are renewed in the whole man after the image of God and are enabled more and more to die to sin and to live to Righteousness (1 Cor. 6:18-20; Rom 6:15-23; Gal 5)
35. How do justification and sanctification differ?
Justification is a forensic legal act that God proclaim us to be right be from him. This happens in a punctiliar moment. Where sanctification comes after Justification and starts at a definitive time, but progresses until we are in glory.
36. Contrast the Reformed with the Roman Catholic view of justification in regards to how each differs over the:
...
• nature of justification:
Reformed view of the nature of Justification is a forensic act that declares us righteous. Roman Catholic view of the nature of Justification is an transferal act of man working in himself, while God's grace being infused in him.
• ground of justification:
Reformed view of the ground of Justification is by Christ's Righteousness alone. Roman Catholic view of the ground of Justification is both man's work and God's grace.
• means of justification:
Reformed view of the means of Justification is through faith and repentance. The Roman Catholic view of the means of Justification is the sacraments.
• effect of justification:
The reformed view on the effect of Justification is assurance. The Roman Catholic view of the effect of justification is that there is no assurance.
37. What is the relationship between faith and good works?
True faith will produce good works (James 2:18). After being Justified by faith; works are the byproduct of a new resurrected life of the holy spirit living in us making us slaves to righteousness (rom. 6; 1 cor 6:18-20; Gal 5; Col 3:1,5)
38. Define and defend "sola fide."
We are saved by faith alone in Christ alone (Eph 2:8-9)
39. What is repentance unto life?
When a sinner is grieve and hatred over his sin and guilt turns from it unto God and seek a new purpose of and endurance after a life of obedience to God through faith and repentance.
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40. What does the resurrection mean to the believer in this life?
It is a promise that we who are in Christ, will be raised just like him. That we will not die under the power of sin, but be raised with Christ (1 Cor. 15; 1 Thess. 4:13-18).
41. What is the moral law?
The 10 commandments is the summary of the moral law, which is written on all peoples' hearts (Ex. 20; Duet 5; Rom 1).
42. What are the three categories of law?
The moral, civil, and ceremonial.
43. What are the three uses of the law?
In what sense has the believer been "freed from the law"? the 1st use of the law is to show us our guilt (Gal 2:16; 3:24). The 2nd use of the law restrain sin in this world. The 3rd use of the law is to teach us how to live holy lives (ps 1:1-2; Gal 3:21, 24). We are free from the law in the way that we no longer earn our righteousness under the law (Gal 2:16, 21; 5:1). Only Christ is our righteousness (Gal 2:21).
44. Under what obligation is the Christian to the judicial laws of the Mosaic covenant? Relate this to WCF19.4 "To them also as a body politic he gave sundry judicial laws which expired together with the state of that people; not obliging any other now further than the general equity thereof may require"?
This means civil and ceremonial law were abrogated under the New covenant. But is prudent for us to apply some of the civil laws because they are beneficial in our practical living.
45. What is prayer?
Prayer is offering up our requests to God with faith, and delighting in seeking God face as we commune with him (Matt 6:5-13).
46. Are all transgressions of God's law equally heinous in themselves and in God's sight? If not what makes some sins more heinous than others?
No, some sins are more evil than others (Gen. 6:5)
47. What is hell?
Hell is a real physical place that will eternally punish (cognitively and physically) those (unregenerate people; the devil and his angles) who reject Christ as lord and savior (Rev 20; Matt 25:30; 41; Jude 1:7).
48. What is heaven?
Heaven is where God's throne is (Rev. 4). It is a place where saints will dwell for a temporary time, but the permanent place where God and his people will dwell for all eternity is in the new heavens and new earth, which will be the new creation cosmos after all is judged (Rev. 20-22).
49. Define Christ's Second Coming.
The second coming of Christ is when he comes to judge everyone (Rev 20; Matt. 25:29-31; 1 Thess. 4:13-18).