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Terms in this set (4)

-Using silence allows the client to take control of the discussion, if he or she so desires.
-Accepting conveys positive regard.
-Giving recognition is acknowledging, indicating awareness.
-Offering self is making oneself available.
-Giving broad openings allows the client to select the topic.
-Offering general leads encourages the client to continue.
-Placing the event in time or sequence clarifies the relationship of events in time.
-Making observations is verbalizing what is observed or perceived.
-Encouraging description of perceptions is asking client to verbalize what is being perceived.
-Encouraging comparison asks the client to compare similarities and differences in ideas, experiences, or interpersonal relationships.
-Restating lets the client know whether an expressed statement has or has not been understood.
-Reflecting directs questions or feelings back to client so that they may be recognized and accepted.
-Focusing is taking notice of a single idea or even a single word.
-Exploring is delving further into a subject, idea, experience, or relationship.
-Seeking clarification and validation strives to explain what is vague and searches for mutual understanding.
-Presenting reality clarifies misconceptions that client may be expressing.
-Voicing doubt expresses uncertainty as to the reality of client's perception.
-Verbalizing the implied is putting into words what client has only implied.
-Attempting to translate words into feelings is putting into words the feelings the client has expressed only indirectly.
-Formulating a plan of action strives to prevent anger or anxiety from escalating to an unmanageable level the next time the stressor occurs.
-Giving reassurance may discourage client from further expression of feelings if client believes the feelings will only be belittled.
-Rejecting is refusing to consider client's ideas or behavior.
-Giving approval or disapproval implies that the nurse has the right to pass judgment on the "goodness" or "badness" of client's behavior.
-Agreeing/disagreeing implies that the nurse has the right to pass judgment on whether client's ideas or opinions are "right" or "wrong."
-Giving advice implies that the nurse knows what is best for the client and that the client is incapable of any self-direction.
-Probing is pushing for answers to issues the client does not wish to discuss and causes the client to feel used and valued only for what is shared with the nurse.
-Defending means to defend what the client has criticized implying that the client has no right to express ideas, opinions, or feelings.
-Requesting an explanation. Asking "Why?" implies that the client must defend his or her behavior or feelings.
-Indicating the existence of an external source of power encourages the client to project blame for his or her thoughts or behaviors on others.
-Belittling feelings expressed causes the client to feel insignificant or unimportant.
-Making stereotyped comments, clichés, and trite expressions are meaningless in a nurse-client relationship.
-Using denial blocks discussion with the client and avoids helping him or her identify and explore areas of difficulty.
-Interpreting results is the therapist's telling the client the meaning of his or her experience.
-Introducing an unrelated topic causes the nurse to take over the direction of the discussion.