17 terms

Direct and Indirect Characterization

STUDY
PLAY

Terms in this set (...)

Direct Characterization
When an author describes a character directly.
Indirect Characterization
When you have to make an inference or draw a conclusion abour a character based on details the author gives.
Direct characterization
"I have light-brown, almost-red hair and greenish-gray eyes."
Indirect characterization
"Johnny gulped and got a little pale, but he said, "You heard me. Leave her alone."
Direct characterization
"Socials were the jet set - the West-side rich kids."
Direct characterization
"Greasers are almost like hoods."
Indirect characterization
"Dally got up and stalked off, his fists jammed in his pockets and a frown on his face. He didn't come back."
Direct characterization
"She was a little smaller than Cherry. She was cute, but that Cherry Valance was a real looker."
Indirect characterization
"I quit worrying about everything and thought about how nice it was to sit with a girl.
Direct characterization
Grendel is evil.
Indirect characterization
"But Johnny, except for the fact that his hands were twitching, looked as cool as Darry ever had."
Indirect characterization
"Dally walked us back to the door, turning off the porch light before we stepped out. "Git goin'!" He messed up Johnny's hair. "Take care, kid," he said softly."
Direct characterization
The seafarer, lonely and scared, was determined to search for foreign land.
Indirect characterization
"Ponyboy . . . I mean . . . if I see you in the hall at school or someplace and don't say hi, well, it's not personal or anything, but . . ."
Indirect characterization
Hrothgar bowed his head and searched through his mind. What can he do to stop Grendel?
Direct characterization
The wanderer has sorrow in his heart.
Indirect characterization
Beowulf snatched the monster's arm off with his bare hands.