Shot Types

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Shot Types
Certain combinations of camera distance and focal length
Extreme Long Shot
Captures a scene in its entirety; used for establishing location in exterior shots
Extreme Long Shot
Used frequently in epic genres such as westerns and war films. It reduces human beings to mere dots on the screen
Long Shot
Accommodates at least the entire bodies of figures; captures movement, background, and broad gestures and expressions
Full Shot
Only accommodates the entire bodies of figures
Medium Shot
Contains a figure from the waist or knees up
Medium Shot
It is a functional shot, favored in classical Hollywood editing, often used for scenes with dialogue
Close-Up
Includes very little if any background, concentrating on an object. Often accord great significance and symbolic value to the objects that portray
Extreme Close-Up
Includes very little if any background concentrating on a fragment of an object, such as the human face
Deep Focus Shot
A variation of the long shot that keeps objects in the foreground, middle ground, and background in focus all at once
Deep Focus Shot
Realist filmmakers favor this shot because it preserves spatial unity and lets the viewer scan the image for meaning.
Shot-Reverse Shot/Over-the-Shoulder
Two types of shots used during dialogue scenes to give the sense that two or more characters are conversing with each other.
Point of View Shot
A shot framed in a way that prompts viewers to believe they are looking from a specific character's point of view.
Point of View Shot
These shots can often contribute to the process of audience identification with one or more characters in a film
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