80 terms

Literary Terms Year 12 Mrs Reid

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acronym
a word composed of initial letters/syllables of a phrase or organisation
active voice
the subject of the sentence performs the action
passive voice
the subject of the sentence is acted upon, most common in formal language
allegory
a story in verse or prose on two levels
alliteration
repetition of initial letters
allusion
reference to a well-known person, place or thing
ambiguity
two possible meanings
analogy
comparison to show a similarity
antonym
a word of opposite meaning
archaism
outdated words
assonance
repetition of similar vowel sounds
emotive language
deliberate choice of words to illicit emotion
caesura
pause mid-line in poetry
cliche
overused/stale saying
colloquial
informal language or slang, usually spoken
connotation
emotional meaning
consonance
repetition of consonant sounds with different vowels between
denotation
dictionary meaning of a word
dialect
words and accents that belong to a region
dialogue
scripted speech/conversation between people
ellipsis
a series of 3 dots that indicates
enjambment
a run-on line in poetry
euphemism
softening of something unpleasant
eye of God
omniscient or all-seeing third person narrative. The narrator shows the character's inner thoughts and feelings
fable
story or poem in which animals take the place of humans, usually with a moral
figurative language
based on comparisons or imagery (word pictures)
formal language
precise, politically correct language, used by those who are not in a relaxed situation
genre
form of literature
homonym
words which are spelt the same but mean different things
homophone
words which sound the same but mean different things
hyperbole
exaggeration for effect
imperative
command form of a verb
informal language
language that is colloquial, casual, or suggests familiarity
innuendo
something hinted at nut not stated directly, often unpleasant overtones
inversion
reversal of normal word order
irony
a) a perverse event or circumsatnce
b) saying the opposite of what is meant
jargon
elaborate technical language used by a group or profession
listing
where the writer uses a list
literal
actual meaning
metaphor
direct comparison
extended metaphor
comparison continued through a poem, fable or parable
anecdote
a short interesting story about a real incident or person
mnemonic
memory aid
monologue
one way conversation
onomatopoeia
sound of word suggests the meaning
parable
bible story with a moral
parody
style of another work is imitated, usually for humour
personification
giving human characteristics to non-human objects
propaganda
persuasive language to promote a belief or value, now often seen as lies and dangerous
proverb
short saying, in common use and often metaphorical or traditional
pun
play on words
repetition
repeating words and phrases
rhetorical question
asking a question where no answer is expected
rhythm
the pattern of stressed and unstressed syllables, often in poetry
sarcasm
bitter, wounding remarks, often opposite of what is meant (verbal irony)
satire
use of ridicule, irony, sarcasm, to expose and discourage folly or weakness
simile
indirect comparison using like or as
soliloquy
speech when alone on stage
stereotype
fixed idea of sex or type
stream of consciousness
supposedly random flow of thoughts of characters in fiction, often disjointed and difficult to follow
style
all aspects of how a piece of literature is said or written (the individual flavour of the writer)
superlatives
the extreme comparison of an adjective
symbolism
where something represents something else
synonym
a word of similar meaning
syntax
word order in a sentence
statistic
A researched fact involving numbers or percentages
tone
the mood or feeling conveyed by a piece
transcript
written version of spoken language
understatement
said more weakly than the meaning intended
verbal contractions
combining of words using apostrophes
anachronism
something that is out of its historical time
antithesis
balanced, contrasting phrases or sentences ('to be or not to be')
didactic language
language intended to instruct or teach
idiom
a common expression that is not meant to be taken literally (e.g. its raining cats and dogs)
neologism
a new word or phrase
Portmanteau word
a combination of two words into an appropriate third word (e.g. smog / brunch / spork)
sibilance
a specific type of alliteration where soft consonant sounds are repeated to create a hissing effect, e.g. 'sing a song of sixpence'
mixed metaphor
a confusing mixture of comparisons
register
the level of formality of a text
verbosity
using too many words