89 terms

AP Human Midterm Practice Questions #1

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1. Demography is
A) the study of the relationship between government and population.
B) the study of population.
C) the study of population growth.
D) the mapping of population characteristics.
E) none of the above
B) the study of population.
2. Arithmetic density is
A) the number of people per unit of measurement.
B) the number of farmers per square mile of all available land.
C) the number of people per square mile of arable land.
D) the number of farmers per square mile of arable land.
E) the number of people per square mile of inhabitable land
A) the number of people per unit of measurement.
3. Which of the following countries has the lowest arithmetic density?
A) Brazil.
B) United States.
C) United Kingdom.
D) Canada.
E) India.
D) Canada
4. Agricultural density is
A) the number of people per square mile of all available land.
B) the number of farmers per square mile of all available land.
C) the number of people per square mile of arable land.
D) the number of farmers per square mile of arable land.
E) the number of people per square mile of inhabitable land.
D) the number of farmers per square mile of arable land.
5. Physiological density is
A) the number of people per square mile of all available land.
B) the number of farmers per square mile of all available land.
C) the number of people per square mile of arable land.
D) the number of farmers per square mile of arable land.
E) the number of people per square mile of inhabitable land.
C) the number of people per square mile of arable land.
21. Highland areas support large populations in
A) Central Mexico.
B) East Africa.
C) Central Asia.
D) Southeast Asia.
E) A and B only.
E) A and B only.
22. The largest major population concentration of North America is
A) from Miami to Jacksonville.
B) from San Diego to San Francisco.
C) from Washington D.C. to Boston.
D) from Toronto to Montreal.
E) none of the above.
C) from Washington D.C. to Boston
23. Which statement best describes the different characteristics of population in the
United States and Europe?
A) Europe has many more wide-open spaces than the United States has.
B) The United States has more area than Europe does.
C) The arithmetic density of the United States is less than that of Europe.
D) Europe's population density is lower than that of the United States.
E) Europe's population is smaller than that of the United States.
C) The arithmetic density of the United States is less than that of Europe.
24. Carrying capacity is the
A) limit at which population can be sustained through its resources and trade.
B) maximum number of people an area can support using the theoretical limits of energy
production.
C) maximum number of people an area can support using organic agricultural methods
and technology.
D) maximum number of people an area can support using all of its available
resources and technology.
E) maximum number of people an area can support using traditional agricultural
methods.
D) maximum number of people an area can support using all of its available
resources and technology.
25. The theory that farmers will adopt new and modern methods to keep up with
demand caused by an increasing population was proposed by
A) Thomas Malthus.
B) Neo-Malthusians.
C) Esther Boserup.
D) Ernest Ravenstein.
E) Walter Christaller
C) Esther Boserup.
26. Which statement about overpopulation is true?
A) Overpopulation is unlikely because food production potential is unlimited.
B) Overpopulation occurs when an area's population is greater than its carrying
capacity.
C) Overpopulation can only occur in less-developed areas.
D) Overpopulation is achieved when the physiological density reaches more than
1,000/km.
E) All of the above.
B) Overpopulation occurs when an area's population is greater than its carrying
capacity.
27. Under what circumstances could high birth rates pose a challenge for a country?
A) If a country's economy grows at a slower rate than the Crude Birth Rate (CBR).
B) If a country is unable to provide adequate health care for its citizens.
C) If a country's natural resources are depleted in an unsustainable manner.
D) If a country's population structure resembles a pyramid.
E) All of the above.
E) All of the above.
28. The highest Crude Birth Rates (CBR) in the world are found in
A) Latin America.
B) Middle East.
C) China.
D) Sub-Saharan Africa.
E) Europe.
D) Sub-Saharan Africa.
39. This is the measurement that shows the average number of people in an area's
population who are not economically productive, who must be supported by the area's
economically productive population.
A) Employment Ratio.
B) Dependency Ratio.
C) Industrial Production Ratio.
D) Productive Class Ratio.
E) Jobless Ratio.
B) Dependency Ratio
40. All of the following populated areas are on or close to major earthquake fault lines
except
A) central Mexico.
B) Japan.
C) western Europe.
D) Indonesia.
E) California
C) western Europe.
41. What differentiates a natural disaster from a natural hazard?
A) A natural disaster includes only the loss of life.
B) A natural hazard includes only the loss of property.
C) A natural disaster often includes the loss of property and life.
D) A natural hazard is a predictable event.
E) All of the above.
C) A natural disaster often includes the loss of property and life.
42. Which of the following graphs exhibits a J-curve?
A) Global Birth Rates over time.
B) Global Infant Mortality Rates over time.
C) Global Population Growth over time.
D) Global Dependency Ratio rate over time.
E) All of the above.
C) Global Population Growth over time.
43. Historically, the world's population grew
A) very steadily from 1000 CE until the present.
B) slowly until about 1800 CE, before growing quickly between 1800 CE and the
present.
C) quickly until about 1800 CE, before slowing down between 1800 CE and the present.
D) slowly until about 1000 CE, before growing quickly between 1000 CE and the
present.
E) quickly until about 1000 CE, before declining between 1800 CE and the present.
B) slowly until about 1800 CE, before growing quickly between 1800 CE and the
present.
44. Over the past 200 years, the population of the world
A) has increased by approximately more than 5.5 billion.
B) has increased by more than 7 billion.
C) has increased by about 80 million people per year.
D) has slightly decreased from a high of 8 billion to under 7 billion.
E) has roughly stayed the same.
A) has increased by approximately more than 5.5 billion.
45. In the next 50 years, the population of the world
A) is expected to level off at slightly more than 12 billion.
B) is expected to rise to a high of 13 billion before starting to decline.
C) is expected to decline to less than 5 billion people due to lack of food supply.
D) is expected to double to over 13 billion people.
E) is expected to rise to approximately 9 billion.
E) is expected to rise to approximately 9 billion.
46. The total change in population of a country's population is represented by which of
the following equations?
A) Total Population Change = Number of Births - Number of Deaths + Number of
Immigrants - Number of Emigrants.
B) Total Population Change = Number of Births - Number of Deaths + Number of
Emigrants - Number of Immigrants.
C) Total Population Change = Number of Births + Number of Deaths - Number of
Immigrants + Number of Emigrants.
D) Total Population Change = Number of Births + Number of Immigrants.
E) Total Population Change = Number of Deaths - Number of Emigrants.
A) Total Population Change = Number of Births - Number of Deaths + Number of
Immigrants - Number of Emigrants
47. A country's Total Fertility Rate is
A) the average number of children a woman can expect to give birth to during her
lifetime.
B) the number of children who are born and survive past their first birthday.
C) the average number of children who are born and survive for a week.
D) the total number of children born per 1,000 population.
E) a theoretical maximum number of children a woman can bear
A) the average number of children a woman can expect to give birth to during her
lifetime.
48. In order to replace its population only, a country needs a total fertility rate of
A) 1.2.
B) 2.1.
C) 3.0.
D) 3.5.
E) 4.1.
B) 2.1.
49. A country's Crude Birth Rate (CBR) is
A) the average number of children a woman can expect to give birth to during her
lifetime.
B) the number of children who are born and survive past their first birthday.
C) the average number of children who are born and survive for a week.
D) the total number of children born per 1,000 population.
E) a theoretical maximum number of children a woman can bear.
D) the total number of children born per 1,000 population.
50. The United Kingdom has a higher death rate than Costa Rica. This is due to the fact
that
A) Costa Rica has a more modern health care system than the United Kingdom.
B) Costa Rica's population is younger than the United Kingdom's population.
C) the United Kingdom has a much higher infant mortality rate than Costa Rica.
D) the United Kingdom has many more incidences of industrial accidents than Costa
Rica.
E) the United Kingdom has a higher cancer rate than Costa Rica.
B) Costa Rica's population is younger than the United Kingdom's population.
51. Poland's total fertility rate is 1.2. What impact will this have on Poland's population?
A) Poland's population is steadily increasing.
B) Poland's population is quickly increasing.
C) Poland has reached zero population growth.
D) Poland's population is decreasing.
E) Poland's population has a doubling time of about 23 years.
D) Poland's population is decreasing.
52. A country's Crude Death Rate (CDR) is
A) the total number of people who die in any given year.
B) the total number of elderly people who die in any given year.
C) the total number of children who are born and die within the first year.
D) the total number of people who die in a given year, excluding infants.
E) the total number of people who die per 1,000 population
E) the total number of people who die per 1,000 population.
53. Presently, natural increase in population is primarily due to
A) an increase in the birth rate.
B) an increase in the death rate.
C) a decrease in the birth rate.
D) a decrease in the death rate.
E) an increase in the birth rate combined with a decrease in the death rate.
D) a decrease in the death rate.
54. Even after a country's birth rate and death rate reach a point of zero population
growth, the total population will continue to grow for a period of time before it starts to
decline. This concept is known as
A) demographic momentum.
B) natural increase.
C) a baby boom.
D) an echo boom.
E) a population explosion.
A) demographic momentum.
55. The Natural Increase Rate (NIR) is calculated by
A) adding the Crude Death Rate (CDR) from the Crude Birth Rate (CBR) and dividing
by 70.
B) subtracting the Crude Death Rate (CDR) from the Crude Birth Rate (CBR) and
dividing by 70.
C) adding the Crude Death Rate (CDR) to the Crude Birth Rate (CBR).
D) subtracting the Crude Birth Rate (CBR) from the Crude Death Rate (CDR).
E) subtracting the Crude Death Rate (CDR) from the Crude Birth Rate (CBR).
E) subtracting the Crude Death Rate (CDR) from the Crude Birth Rate (CBR).
Use these data to answer the following questions 56-58.
Country A Country B
Crude birth rate 38 per 1000 people Crude birth rate 18 per 1000 people
Crude death rate 18 per 1000 people Crude death rate 9 per 1000 people
56. The Natural Increase Rate (NIR) of Country A is
A) 56 per 1000.
B) 2%.
C) 20%.
D) half the rate of Country B.
E) about the same rate as Country B.
B) 2%.
Use these data to answer the following questions 56-58.
Country A Country B
Crude birth rate 38 per 1000 people Crude birth rate 18 per 1000 people
Crude death rate 18 per 1000 people Crude death rate 9 per 1000 people
57. From the data, one might conclude that Country B
A) is in Stage 1 of the Demographic Transition Model (DTM).
B) has achieved zero population growth.
C) has a negative rate of natural increase.
D) is a less developed country.
E) is a more developed country.
E) is a more developed country.
Use these data to answer the following questions 56-58.
Country A Country B
Crude birth rate 38 per 1000 people Crude birth rate 18 per 1000 people
Crude death rate 18 per 1000 people Crude death rate 9 per 1000 people
58. From the data, it is apparent that
A) the population of Country A will double in 35 years.
B) the population of Country B will double in 15 years.
C) the carrying capacity of Country A is being strained.
D) Country A has a larger population than Country B.
E) Country A is overpopulated.
A) the population of Country A will double in 35 years
59. The Natural Increase Rate (NIR) measures
A) the rate of population growth in an area as measured by its birth rate and death
rate.
B) the rate of population growth in an area as measured by its birth rate, death rate, and
immigration rate.
C) the rate of population growth in an area as measured by its birth rate and immigration
rate.
D) the rate of population growth in an area as measured by its birth rate, death rate, and
emigration rate.
E) the rate of population growth in an area as measured by its birth rate, death rate,
immigration rate, and emigration rate.
A) the rate of population growth in an area as measured by its birth rate and death
rate
60. The Total Fertility Rate of the United States for 2008 was estimated to be 2.1. What
does this mean for the population of the United States?
A) The doubling time of the United States is about 35 years.
B) The United States is experiencing rapid natural increase.
C) All population growth in the United States is due to migration and not natural
increase.
D) The United States will experience population decline in the next 30 years.
E) All of the above.
C) All population growth in the United States is due to migration and not natural
increase
61. At the current growth rate, the doubling time of the world's population
is approximately
A) 14 years.
B) 26 years.
C) 38 years.
D) 54 years.
E) 80 years
D) 54 years.
62. Which statement about the Male-Female Sex Ratio is most accurate?
A) More males are born than females, but females outnumber males after age 80.
B) More females are born than males, but males outnumber females after age 80.
C) Males outnumber females at all ages.
D) Females outnumber males at all ages.
E) Males and females are equal in number at all ages.
A) More males are born than females, but females outnumber males after age 80
63. The major factor contributing to the explosive population growth in More Developed
Countries (MDCs) during the 19
th
and early 20
th
centuries was
A) the diffusion of the Industrial Revolution.
B) the diffusion of modern medical practices
C) the diffusion of vaccines and antibiotics.
D) the diffusion of family planning programs.
E) the diffusion of birth control devices.
A) the diffusion of the Industrial Revolution.
64. What effect did the diffusion of modern medical practices and drugs have on the
global population?
A) Healthier diets for women increased the total fertility rate around the world.
B) Population increased because many formerly fatal diseases were cured.
C) The world experienced lower death rates due to an increased emphasis on sanitation.
D) A and B only.
E) B and C only.
E) B and C only.
65. The major reason for high growth rates in Least Developed Countries (LDCs) is
A) most people in Least Developed Countries (LDCs) do not have access to birth control.
B) the total fertility rate in Least Developed Countries (LDCs) is nearing 7 children born
per woman.
C) people in Least Developed Countries (LDCs) have lower incidence of fatal diseases
than people in More Developed Countries (MDCs).
D) the birth rate in Least Developed Countries (LDCs) has increased dramatically over
the past 50 years.
E) advanced medical practices and drugs have dramatically reduced death rates in
Least Developed Countries (LDCs).
E) advanced medical practices and drugs have dramatically reduced death rates in
Least Developed Countries (LDCs).
66. Presently, most population growth in the world is occurring
A) in Western countries.
B) in More Developed Countries (MDCs).
C) in Least Developed Countries (LDCs).
D) in Africa.
E) in the Western Hemisphere.
C) in Least Developed Countries (LDCs).
67. Thomas Malthus believed that
A) the government should encourage population growth in order to fully staff the
factories being built during the Industrial Age.
B) the world would soon be overpopulated because population grows at an
exponential rate while the food supply increases at an arithmetic rate.
C) the world would find new sources of food production to offset population growth.
D) population increase will continue because many religions discourage the use of
contraceptives.
E) all of the above.
B) the world would soon be overpopulated because population grows at an
exponential rate while the food supply increases at an arithmetic rate.
68. Neo-Malthusian theory believes that
A) in addition to outstripping food supply, world population growth is also
overtaxing other resources like fuel and energy.
B) governments should discourage population growth because industrial growth is
slowing in the developed countries.
C) population growth in Least Developed Countries (LCDs) will end as the population in
those countries becomes more educated.
D) More Developed Countries (MDCs) will experience a population crash due to the
aging of their populations.
E) none of the above
A) in addition to outstripping food supply, world population growth is also
overtaxing other resources like fuel and energy.
69. According to Thomas Malthus, natural "checks" on a population include all of the
following except
A) disease.
B) famine.
C) war.
D) natural disasters.
E) agricultural advancements.
E) agricultural advancements
70. Life expectancy is
A) the average number of years a person will live at birth.
B) the number of years a person will live.
C) the average number of years a person will live according to their genetic makeup.
D) the number of years a person could theoretically live.
E) the average number of years a person is expected to live.
E) the average number of years a person is expected to live.
71. Which of the following factors does not affect a person's life expectancy?
A) Gender/sex.
B) Socio-economic status.
C) Education.
D) Parents' ages at the time of the person's birth.
E) Access to health care.
D) Parents' ages at the time of the person's birth.
72. Which person is most likely to live to be 100 years old?
A) A newborn male.
B) A 16-year-old female.
C) A 45-year-old male.
D) A 54-year old female.
E) A 91 year-old male.
B) A 16-year-old female.
73. Reasons why life expectancy in Africa is so low include all of the following except
A) the diffusion of AIDS.
B) poor sanitation.
C) famine.
D) the spread of SARS.
E) frequent fighting and war
D) the spread of SARS
79. Why was the Demographic Transition Model based on England's experience?
A) The church kept excellent birth and death records from the year 1000 CE.
B) England experienced less migration than most other countries in Europe.
C) England's territory has changed little.
D) England was the fir
E) All of the above.
80. How can a country or region slow down its birth rates?
A) Keep girls in school longer.
B) Improve the quality of life for its citizens.
C) Distribute birth control devices.
D) Fund family planning programs.
E) All of the above.
E) All of the above.
81. An anti-natalist population policy
A) is meant to lower the infant mortality rate.
B) is meant to raise the Total Fertility Rate (TFR) of the population.
C) is meant to lower the Total Fertility Rate (TFR) of the population.
D) encourages population growth.
E) discourages the use of birth control
C) is meant to lower the Total Fertility Rate (TFR) of the population.
82. An example of an anti-natalist population program is
A) China's One Child Policy.
B) Singapore's Population and Family Planning Board.
C) India's sterilization programs.
D) Iran's programs to encourage small families.
E) All of the above.
E) All of the above.
83. Reasons why governments promote anti-natalist population policies include
A) controlling the high population growth of a country.
B) preserving the culture of the country.
C) efforts to make women second-class citizens.
D) efforts to stimulate the economy of the area.
E) all of the above.
A) controlling the high population growth of a country.
84. Which country's government is most likely to promote an anti-natalist population
policy?
A) United Kingdom.
B) China.
C) France.
D) Russia.
E) Australia.
B) China.
85. Pro-natalism is
A) a governmental policy that discourages its population to have more children.
B) a government policy that encourages its population to have more children.
C) a government policy that encourages growth through migration.
D) a government policy that encourages zero population growth.
E) none of the above
B) a government policy that encourages its population to have more children.
86. An example of a pro-natalist population program is
A) a program that gives women a monetary stipend for having three or more children.
B) a law that allows families to receive tax breaks for dependent children.
C) a law that establishes free and reduced day care for all families.
D) a law that requires businesses to give women generous maternity leave policies.
E) all of the above.
E) all of the above.
87. Reasons the government would create pro-natalist population policies include
A) preserving their country's culture.
B) lowering the dependency ratio of the country.
C) insuring that the country has an adequate future workforce.
D) all of the above.
E) A and B only
D) all of the above.
88. Which country's government is most likely to promote a pro-natalist population
policy?
A) United Kingdom.
B) China.
C) France.
D) India.
E) Nigeria.
C) France.
89. The phenomenon when a country experiences a decline in the total fertility rate so
that it experiences no natural increase is known as
A) Zero Population Growth.
B) Demographic Balance.
C) Natural Increase Neutrality.
D) Population Stagnation Point.
E) none of the above.
A) Zero Population Growth.
90. What is an excellent way to bring down a country's population growth rate without
increased funding for family planning and distribution of birth control devices?
A) Improve the economic environment.
B) Improve the health care system.
C) Decrease military expenditures.
D) Increase funding for early childhood education.
E) All of the above.
A) Improve the economic environment.
91. The type of migration in which a person chooses to migrate is called
A) chain migration.
B) step migration.
C) forced migration.
D) voluntary migration.
E. channelized migration.
D) voluntary migration.
92. According to Ravenstein's Laws of Migration, every migration flow generates
a return migration flow. This phenomenon is known as
A) transposed migration.
B) reverse migration.
C) counter-urbanization.
D) counter-migration.
E) none of the above.
D) counter-migration.
93. Which of Ravenstein's Laws of Migration best reflects the Gravity Model?
A) Most migrants are male.
B) Most migrants move short distances.
C) Most long distance migrants move to large urban areas.
D) All of the above.
E) A and B only.
D) All of the above.
94. According to Ravenstein's Laws of Migration, which group is most likely to move?
A) Older adults.
B) Young adults.
C) Children.
D) Families.
E) All of the above.
B) Young adults.
95. According to Ravenstein's Laws of Migration, long distance migrants tend to settle
A) in rural farming areas.
B) in the United States.
C) in large cities.
D) in small towns.
E) all of the above.
C) in large cities.
96. Migration from a location is called
A) immigration.
B) voluntary migration.
C) emigration.
D) step migration.
E) chain migration.
C) emigration.
97. Migration to a location is called
A) immigration.
B) voluntary migration.
C) mobility.
D) emigration
E) migration.
A) immigration
98. Reasons why a person feels compelled to leave his or her home area is called
A) push factors.
B) pull factors.
C) place utility factors.
D) economic indicator factors.
E) none of the above.
A) push factors.
99. Reasons why a migrant is attracted to a specific destination is called
A) push factors.
B) pull factors.
C) place utility factors.
D) economic indicator factors.
E) none of the above.
B) pull factors.
100. Which of the following is an example of a push factor?
A) A stable government in the migrant's chosen destination.
B) A stable government in the migrant's country of origin.
C) Plentiful jobs in the migrant's chosen destination.
D) Lack of employment in a migrant's city of residence.
E) All of the above.
D) Lack of employment in a migrant's city of residence.
101. Which of the following is an example of a pull factor?
A) War or famine in the migrant's country of origin.
B) Political persecution in a migrant's homeland.
C) Religious persecution in a migrant's chosen destination.
D) Natural disaster that threatens a migrant's home.
E) Plentiful jobs in the migrant's chosen destination.
E) Plentiful jobs in the migrant's chosen destination.
102. All of the following would be considered pull factors except
A) religious tolerance in a migrant's chosen destination.
B) a stable government in a migrant's chosen destination.
C) acceptance towards immigrants in a migrant's chosen destination.
D) religious persecution in a migrant's chosen destination.
E) plentiful jobs in a migrant's chosen destination.
D) religious persecution in a migrant's chosen destination.
103. Which example is a not an environmental push?
A) The Dust Bowl of the 1930s.
B) Hurricane Katrina.
C) Cold dreary winters in the U.S. upper Midwest.
D) Desert environment of the American Southwest.
E) Desertification of the Sahel.
D) Desert environment of the American Southwest.
104. The largest internal migration in history is
A) the migration of Mexican workers to maquiladora factory towns from 1980 to present.
B) the migration of Native Americans to reservations in the late 1800s.
C) the migration of Muslims from India to Pakistan after World War II.
D) the rural to urban migration in China from 1970 to present.
E) the migration of Europeans to North America from 1600 to 1900.
D) the rural to urban migration in China from 1970 to present.
105. When did the United States experience record numbers of immigrants?
A) Late 19th century.
B) Early 20th century.
C) Mid 20th century.
D) 1960s.
E) A and B only.
E) A and B only
106. Over the past 30 years, the number of undocumented immigrants in the United
States
A) has increased because of the demand for menial laborers in the United States has
grown.
B) has increased because of more relaxed border security since September 11, 2001.
C) has decreased because of greater border security.
D) has decreased because of poor economic conditions in the United States.
E) A and B only
A) has increased because of the demand for menial laborers in the United States has
grown.
107. The largest source of international immigrants to the United States is from
A) China.
B) India.
C) Canada.
D) Mexico.
E) Russia.
D) Mexico.
108. Which statement best describes settlement patterns of international migrants in
large cities?
A) Immigrants settle mostly in the suburban areas of cities.
B) Immigrants settle in a dispersed pattern in cities.
C) Immigrants settle in a random pattern in most cities.
D) Immigrants settle in proximity to other immigrants from the same culture.
E) All of the above.
D) Immigrants settle in proximity to other immigrants from the same culture.
109. Which of the following is an effect of Chain Migration on the area of destination?
A) Cultural homelands.
B) Culture clusters.
C) Multi-ethnic neighborhoods.
D) Urban slums.
E) Urban ethnic enclaves.
E) Urban ethnic enclaves.
110. The process of migrants moving to a specific location because relatives or members
of the same culture have already migrated and settled there is known as
A) channelized migration.
B) undocumented migration.
C) step migration.
D) chain migration.
E) none of the above
D) chain migration.
111. A type of migration in which a person migrates in a series of short distance
moves is called
A) chain migration.
B) step migration.
C) forced migration.
D) voluntary migration.
E) channelized migration.
B) step migration
112. Over a period of years, a person moves from his farm to a small town, from his
small town to a small city, and finally from the small city to a large city. This is an
example of
A) chain migration.
B) step migration.
C) forced migration.
D) voluntary migration.
E) channelized migration
B) step migration
113. A physical landscape feature or political policy that hinders migration is
A) a migratory barrier.
B) a natural barrier.
C) an intervening opportunity.
D) an intervening obstacle.
E) none of the above.
D) an intervening obstacle.
114. Which of the following is an example of an intervening obstacle?
A) The Demilitarized Zone on the Korean Peninsula.
B) Laws requiring immigrants to obtain visas before entering a country.
C) Laws imposing immigration quotas on the number of immigrants who are allowed to
move into a country.
D) The wall separating the West Bank from Israel.
E) All of these are intervening obstacles
E) All of these are intervening obstacles.
115. Which of the following is an example of an intervening opportunity?
A) The wall separating the West Bank from Israel.
B) The Sahara Desert separating North Africa from West Africa.
C ) Taking a high paying job while en route to your intended destination.
D) Getting detained by border patrol while en route to your intended destination.
E) All of the above.
C ) Taking a high paying job while en route to your intended destination.
116. According to Wilbur Zelinsky's theory of Migration Transition,
A) a person living in a country that is in stage 1 of the Demographic Transition Model
(DTM) is very unlikely to migrate internationally.
B) a person living in a country that is in stage 2 of the Demographic Transition Model
(DTM) is most likely to migrate internationally.
C) a person living in a country that is in stage 3 or 4 of the Demographic Transition
Model (DTM) is likely to migrate internally.
D) all of the above.
E) A and B only.
D) all of the above.
117. Forced migration is
A) a migration flow in which the migrants have no choice but to relocate.
B) a type of migration flow that allows migrants to choose their destination.
C) a type of migration that no longer exists.
D) always the result war or famine.
E) A and D only
A) a migration flow in which the migrants have no choice but to relocate.
118. Which of the following was an example of forced migration?
A) Spanish migration to the Western Hemisphere.
B) Chinese traders' migration to Southeast Asia.
C) India-Pakistan migration after gaining independence.
D) Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade.
E) Settlement of the western frontier in the United States.
D) Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade
119. An example of forced migration is/was
A) deportation of illegal immigrants out of a country.
B) removal of Native Americans to reservations.
C) relocation of Japanese-Americans to internment camps during World War II.
D) moving Jews to concentration camps in Nazi Germany.
E) all of the above.
E) all of the above.