Fahmy spanish - English - Cómo Suprimir las Preocupaciones y Disfrutar de la Vida 1

Terms in this set (1994)

Carrier and applied it to their own problems? Well, here's an example, a fuel trader from New York who was a student in one of my classes. This student stated: It was blackmailed! I did not think possible, Part Fundamental Data You Should Know About Concern Live in Compartments Tobacconists " In the spring of 1871 a young man picked up a book and read twenty words had a profound effect on their future. Medical student at the Montreal General Hospital, was concerned about his final exams, what to do, where you go, how a customer would be created, how life would win. The twenty - two words that this young medical student read in 1871 helped him become the most famous physician of his generation. He organized the world - renowned Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. He became Regius Professor of Medicine at Oxford, which is the highest honor that can be awarded to a physician in the British Empire. He was knighted by the King of England. When he died, it took two volumes with 1466 pages to tell the story of his life. His name is Sir William Osler. Here are the twenty words he read in the spring of 1871, the twenty words of Thomas Carlyle that helped him live free of worries: The main thing for us is not to see what is vaguely located far away, but what is clearly hand. Forty-two years later, in a soft spring night when the tulips bloomed in the gardens, Sir William Osler spoke to students at Yale University. He said these students who used to be assumed that a man like him, who had been a professor at four universities and had written a widely read book, had a special quality brain. He stated that this was inaccurate. He said his closest friends knew that his brain was the most mediocre nature. What, then, was the secret of his success? He said that this was due to what he called living in watertight compartments. What did he mean by this? A few months before speaking at Yale, Sir William Osler had crossed the Atlantic in a large ocean liner where the captain standing on the bridge, could push a button and, poof !, a clatter of machinery and various parts of the ship occurred They were isolated from each other , isolated in watertight compartments. And Dr. Osler told students: Now each one of you is a much more marvelous organization than the great liner, and makes a trip longer. What I ask is that you learn to handle the machinery that will allow them to live in watertight compartments day, as the best way to ensure the safety of the trip. Go up to the bridge and see if at least large bulkheads work well. Apretad the button and hear, at every level of your life, the iron gates that close the Past, dead yesterdays. Apretad another button and shut with a metal curtain, the Future, the morning unborn. So you shall be safe, secure for today ... Shut the past! Let the past bury its dead. Close your yesterdays have hastened the march of fools to a sad end ... Take charge today morning coupled with yesterday staggers the most vigorous. The future we close as tightly as the past ... The future is now ... There is no tomorrow. The day of salvation of man is here, now. Waste of energy, mental anguish and nervous disorders hinder the steps of the man who is anxious about the future ... Shut therefore tightly bulkheads fore and aft and Arise to cultivate the habit of a life into watertight compartments up to date. Did you mean Dr. Osler perhaps we should not make any effort to prepare for the future? Not at all. But he went on to say in that speech that the best way to prepare for tomorrow is to focus, with all the intelligence, all the excitement, is to make today's work superbly today. This is the only way one can prepare for the future. Sir William Osler invited Yale students begin the day with the prayer of Christ: Give us this day our daily bread. Remember that this prayer asks for bread alone today. He does not complain of stale bread we ate yesterday and there does not say: Oh, my God! It rained very little lately in the wheat area and we can have another drought. If so, how can I get my bread next fall? Or suppose I lose my job ... Oh, my God! How can I then get my daily bread? No, this prayer teaches us to ask only bread today. Today's bread is the only bread you can eat. Years ago a philosopher penniless wandering through a rocky country where people's life so hard earned. One day , a crowd gathered around at a height. And the philosopher delivered what is probably the most quoted speech of all time: you not, then, must carefully tomorrow, because tomorrow will take care of their own things. Each day brings its quest. Many have rejected these words of Jesus: Do not be tomorrow must carefully. They have rejected these words as a counsel of perfection, as a matter of Eastern mysticism. And they say I have to take care of tomorrow. I have to make sure to protect my family. I have to save money for my old age. I have to establish plans and prepare to get ahead. Of course! This is undeniable. What happens is that those words of Jesus, translated more than three hundred years, does not mean today what it meant during the reign of King James. Three hundred years ago the word care often meant anxiety. Modern versions of the Bible quote Jesus more accurate to say: Do not be anxious about tomorrow. You have to take care of tomorrow by all means, thinking, planning and preparing. But without anxieties. During the war, our military leaders were planning for tomorrow, but could not afford to be outdone by anxiety. Admiral Ernest J. King, who commanded the US Navy, said, I have provided the best men with the best teams and they have pointed out the mission that seems more successful. It is all I can do. He continued: If sink one of our boats, I can not put it afloat. If you are destined to sink, I can not help it . Worth more than devote my time to the problems of tomorrow that angry with yesterday. Besides, if I let these things take over me, I will not last long. In peace or war, the main difference between the mindset good and bad lies in this: good thinking looks at the causes and effects and leads to logical and construction projects; evil thinking often leads to tension and nervous depression. I had the privilege of Arthur Hays Sulzberger visit (1935-1961), editor of one of the most famous newspapers in the world, The New York Times. Sulzberger told me that when World War II engulfed Europe, was so stunned, so worried about the future, I could hardly sleep. He got up many times at midnight, took a cloth and some paintings, he looked in a mirror and tried to portray. He knew nothing about painting, but painted all ways in order to erase from his mind the concerns. Sulzberger also told me he was never able to achieve this and find peace until it adopted a motto five words of a hymn: One step is to me a lot. Leads, kindly Light ... you will be my guide, who do not want to see distant; One step is to me a lot. Around that same time, a young man in uniform somewhere in Europe was learning the same lesson. His name was Ted was Bengermino and Baltimore, Maryland. He was very worried and falling into an acute case of exhaustion fighter. Bengermino Ted writes: In April 1945 my concerns had led what doctors call a 'spasmodic transverse colon'. It is a condition that causes intense suffering. If the war had not ended when he finished, I have confidence that my physical collapse would have been complete. My exhaustion was total. It was petty officer in charge of registration of graves of the 94th. Infantry Division. My role was to help organize and keep records of the dead, the missing and hospitalized. He had to also help unearth the bodies of the soldiers allies or enemies who had fallen and been buried hastily in shallow holes in battle. He had to gather personal belongings of these men and ensure that they were released to parents or relatives nearby who might have them in much. He was always the concern that we could make embarrassing and costly mistakes. I wondered if I could leave everything with good. I wondered if I could ever have in my arms my only son, a child of sixteen months, whom he had never seen. I was so worried and exhausted that I lost more than fifteen kilos. It was a real frenzy and I felt out of whack. I looked at his hands, which were little more than skin and bones. I was terrified at the thought of returning home physically become a ruin. I felt depressed and cried like a child. I was so upset that tears welled up as I saw me alone. There was a period that began shortly after the Battle of the Salient in crying so often that almost gave up hope of returning to consider me a normal human being. 'I ended up in a clinic Army. A military doctor gave me advice that changed my life completely. After a thorough physical examination me told me that my illness was mentally. I said this: Ted, I want you to tell you that your life is like an hourglass. You know that there are thousands of grains of sand on top of such devices and that these grains slowly pass through the narrow neck of the medium. Neither you nor I could make beans happen faster without spoiling the clock. You, I and other are like hourglasses. When we started the Jomada there before us hundreds of things we know we have to do during the day, but if not we take a to again and make that pass through the day slowly and in due rate, as they pass the grains through the narrow neck of the hourglass, we are destined to destroy our physical or mental structure, with no escape possible. " I have practiced this philosophy at every moment since a military doctor gave me. 'A grain of sand every time ... A task each time.' This advice saved me physically and mentally during the war and has also helped me in my present situation in the profession. I am employed checker stocks Commercial Credit Company of Baltimore. I saw that in my profession had the same problems that had arisen during the war: dozens of things that had to be done quickly, with very little time to do them. Stocks were insufficient. We had to handle new forms, to make a new distribution of stocks, to change directions, to open and close offices and to address many other issues. Rather than get tense and nervous, I remembered what the doctor had told me: 'A grain of sand at a time, one task at a time.' Repeating these words at every moment, I did my job very efficiently and without that sense of confusion and bewilderment that was about to kill me on the battlefield. One of the scariest comments about our current lifestyle is to remember that half of the beds in our hospitals are occupied by patients with nervous and mental diseases, patients who have collapsed under the crushing burden of accumulated yesterdays and feared morning. However, a large majority of these people would be wandering the streets today, leading happy and useful lives have just heard the words of Jesus: Do not be anxious about tomorrow; or words of Sir William Osler: Vivid compartmentalized. You and I are at this moment in the place where there are two eternities: the vast past that will not return and future advances toward the last syllable of recorded time. We can not live in any of these two eternities, even for a split second. But, for trying to do, we can break our bodies and our spirits. Therefore, be content to live the only time you're allowed us to live: from now until bedtime. Everyone can bear its burden, by weighing it, until evening. Everyone can do their work, however hard it is, for one day. Everyone can live gently, patiently, friendly and clean way, until the sun sets. And this is all what life really means. So wrote Robert Louis Stevenson. Yes, this is all that life demands of us, but Mrs. EK Shield, Saginaw, Michigan, was brought to despair and to the brink of suicide before he learned to live only until bedtime. The lady Shield told me his story and spoke thus: In 1937 I lost my husband. She was very depressed and almost penniless. I wrote to my previous employer, Mr. Leon Roach, Roach-Fowler of the Company of Kansas City, and got to give me my old job. He had previously earned me a living selling books to school together urban and rural education. I had sold my car two years ago, when my husband became ill, but I managed and scraped enough money to pay the fee of a second hand car, which allowed me to sell books again. I thought back roads would help me overcome my depression, but drive and eat alone proved, beyond my strength. Part of my territory did not produce much and had difficulty paying the fees of the car, although they were very small. In the spring of 1938 I was working on the outline of Versailles, Missouri. Schools were poor and bad roads; I was so lonely and discouraged that I thought about suicide. It seemed that success was impossible. My life had no purpose. I was afraid the wake every morning to confront existence. I was afraid of everything: of being unable to pay the installments of the car, delay me in my room vacation, of not having enough to eat. I was afraid my health was smashed and lacked money to call the doctor. What kept me from killing myself was thinking it would cause my sister and I would not have money to pay for my funeral. But one day I read an article that took me out of my despair and gave me the courage to live. I will never stop thanking an inspired sentence of this article. He said: 'Every day is a new life for the wise man'. I copied this sentence and placed on the windshield of my car; there he could see while driving. I found that was not so hard to live one day at a time. I learned to forget the yesterdays no longer think in the morning. Every morning, I said: Today is a new life. He had managed to overcome my fear of loneliness, my fear of poverty. I am now happy and prosperous enough; I possess enthusiasm and love of life. Now I know that I should never be afraid, regardless of what life I can book. Now I know I should not fear the future. Now I know that I live one day at a time and that every day is a new life for the wise man. Who will believe that you are the verses that follow? Happy is only good tempered man who today is undisputed owner, who can dare curse him tomorrow: extreme your rigor, I have lived today. These words seem modern, is not it? However, they were written thirty years before Christ was born by the Roman poet Horace. One of the most tragic about human nature that I know things is the tendency of all of us to escape from life. We all dream of a magical rose garden we see on the horizon instead of enjoying the roses that bloom at the foot of our windows. The question arises: Why are we so foolish, so tragically foolish? Stephen Leacock wrote: How strange is our brief procession through the life! The child says: When a big boy. But what is that? The big guy says: When I get older. And the biggest says: When I get married. But what it is to be married, after all? Thought changes to: When you can retire. And then when retirement arrives, he looks back at the landscape traversed; it seems to run a cold wind. There is something that has not been achieved and it disappears. Life, as we learn too late, is to live in the tissue of every day and every hour. The late Edward S. Evans, Detroit almost killed himself with his concerns before realizing that life is to live in the tissue of every day and every hour. Raised in poverty, Edward Evans earned his first money by selling newspapers and then worked as an employee of a shopkeeper. Later, with seven mouths to feed, he got a job as an assistant librarian. The pay was sub par, but was afraid to leave the placement. Eight years passed before it was decided to proceed on their own. But, once he decided, organized with an original investment of fifty-five dollars taken at loan a business that sought to twenty thousand US dollars annually. Then came a frost, a terrible frost. He endorsed a strong note from a friend and it's business went bankrupt. After this disaster came another: the bank where he had all his money sank. Evans not only lost all he had, but was left with a debt of sixteen thousand US dollars. His nerves could not resist. And he told me I could not not sleep or eat. It was a strange disease. Concerns and nothing but the worries caused this disease. One day, when I went down the street, I fainted and fell on the sidewalk. He could no longer walk. They put me on the bed and my body was filled with boils. These boils moved toward the inside, and stay in bed became agony. Every day was weaker. Finally the doctor told me I only had two weeks of life. I was terrified. I concentrated all my will and, lying on the bed, I waited for my order. There was no longer reason to fight or worry. I gave up with profound relief and slept. He had not slept two consecutive hours for weeks, but now with my earthly problems coming to an end, I slept like a baby. My exhaustion began to disappear. He returned my appetite. I regained weight. A few weeks later I could walk with crutches. And month and a half later I could return to work. He had been earning twenty thousand US dollars per year; now I had to be content with a job of thirty dollars a week. My new job was to sell billets that are placed behind the wheels of the cars when they are loaded. He had already learned the lesson. Concerns were over for me; I no longer regretted what happened in the past; I was not afraid of the future. I focused my time, my energy and enthusiasm in selling these chumps. Edward S. Evans now up very quickly. In a few years he became president of the company. His company the Evans Product Company takes a long time included in the prices of the New York Stock Exchange. If ever you go by air to Greenland, it should be landing at the airport Evans, an airport named in his honor. But Edward S. Evans had not achieved these triumphs if he had not learned to live in watertight compartments. You remember what he said the White Queen: The rule is, jam tomorrow and jam yesterday, but never jam today. Almost all of us we spend worrying about the jam yesterday and the morning, instead of spread now jam on our bread. Even the great French philosopher, Montaigne, he made that mistake. Said my life has been full of terrible misfortunes, most of which never happened. The same has happened to me ... and you. Think Dante said that this day will never dawn. Life slips with incredible speed. We rushed through space more than thirty kilometers per second. Today is our most valuable possession. That's all that we really own. Such is the philosophy of Lowell Thomas. I recently spent a weekend at his farm; I noticed that was in a frame hanging on the wall in his radio station, as he could always see them, the words of Psalm CXV: This is the day made by the Lord; rejoice and be glad in it. John Ruskin had on his desk a simple stone on which was engraved a word: TODAY. And if I have not a stone on my desk, I have stuck in my mirror a poem I read every morning when I shave, a poem that Sir William Osler was always in sight, a poem written by the famous Indian playwright Kalidasa: GREETINGS TO ALBA Look to this day! Because it is life, the very life of life. In its brief course lie all the truths and realities of your existence: The blessing of development, the glory of action, the splendor of the achievements ... For yesterday is but a dream and tomorrow is only a vision, but today well lived makes all yesterday a dream of happiness and every tomorrow a vision of hope. Look well therefore to this day! Such is the salutation of the dawn. Therefore, the first thing to know about the concern is this: if you do not want into your life, do what Sir William Osler did: 1. Close the iron gates to the past and the future. Live in day - tight compartments. Why do not you formulated these questions and write their answers? 1. Do I tend to escape from the present life in order to worry about the future or I miss some magical rose garden I see on the horizon? 2. Amargo sometimes my present lamenting things that happened in the past, things that ended and no remedy? 3. I get up in the morning ready to take on the day, to get the most out of these twenty-four hours? 4. Can I get more things in life living in day - tight compartments? 5. When will I start to do this? Next week? Morning? Today? Magic formula to solve situations of concern do you want a quick recipe and tried to face situations of concern, a technique that can be used now, before continuing this reading? In that case, let me speak to them the method developed by Willis H. Carrier, the brilliant engineer who created the air conditioning industry and is now leading the world famous Carrier Corporation in Syracuse, New York. It is one of the best techniques I know about how to resolve issues of concern and I obtained from Mr. Carrier when we had lunch together one day at the Engineers Club of New York. Mr. Carrier told me: When I was young, I worked at the Buffalo Forge Company in Buffalo, New York. I was assigned the task of installing a mechanism for cleaning the gas at a factory of the Pittsburgh Plate Glass Company in Crystal City, Missouri; It was a factory that cost millions of dollars. The purpose of this installation was to remove impurities from the gas, as it could burn without damage to the machines. This method of gas purification was new. He had been tried only once before and under different conditions. In my work Crystal City unforeseen difficulties arose. The installation worked its way, but not well enough to cope with the guarantee had been given. I was overwhelmed by my failure. It was almost as if someone had taken a sledgehammer to the head. My stomach and my gut began to cause me serious discomfort. For a while I was so worried that I could not sleep. Finally common sense reminded me that worry me did not lead anywhere; therefore, I developed a way to treat my problem without worry. This mode worked swimmingly. I have been using this technique for over thirty years. It is simple and anyone can use it . It consists of three steps: Step I. I analyzed the situation bravely and honestly and I figured the worst that could happen as a result of this failure. They would not put me in jail or shoot me . This was undeniable. There was, indeed, the possibility of losing my job and also that my employers would have to remove the machinery and lose the twenty thousand dollars they had invested in the installation. He passed . After imagining the worst that could happen, I became to it and accepted it , if necessary. I said this failure will be a blow to my service record and can mean the loss of my job, but if so, I can always find another job. The conditions may be even worse, and in regard to my employers ... Well, they have to understand that we are experimenting with a new method of purifying the gas and if this trial cuesta.veinte a thousand dollars, can stand perfectly. They can upload it to research, because it is an experiment. After discovering the worst thing that could happen to me , to get me to accept it and, if necessary, occurred something extremely important: Immediately, I felt a relief and peace that had not experienced for days. He passed . Since then, I spent calmly my time and energy to try to improve the worst he already had mentally accepted. 'I tried now to find the ways and means of reducing the loss of twenty thousand US dollars that we faced. I did several tests and finally came to the conclusion 'that if we invested another five thousand dollars of equipment, our problem would be solved. We did this and instead the firm lost twenty thousand US dollars, won fifteen thousand. Probably I never would have gotten this if it had continued worrying, because one of the worst features of the concern is that it destroys our ability to concentrate. When we worry, our spirits walk from here to there, without stopping anywhere, as we lose all power to decide. Instead, when we force ourselves to face the worst and accept it mentally, we eliminate all those imaginings and put ourselves in a position to concentrate on our problem. I have related this incident happened many years ago. The above it worked so well that I've been using it ever since. And as a result, my life has been almost completely free of worries. Now, why the magic formula of Willis H. Carrier is so valuable and so practical from the psychological point of view? For us out of the dark clouds that we grope when concern blinds us. It makes pisemos land. We know where we are. And if not treading water, how is it possible that we can think on the basis of nothing? Professor William James, the father of applied psychology, died in 1910, but if he were alive and heard this formula to face the worst, approve it with enthusiasm. What how I know? Because he told his own students: Accept that has been so ... Accept that has been so because acceptance of what has happened is the first step to overcoming the consequences of any calamity. The same idea was expressed by Lin Yutang in his widely read book The importance of living. This Chinese philosopher said: True peace of mind comes from accepting the worst. Psychologically, I think this means a release of energy. That's right , exactly! Psychologically means a new release of energy. When we accept the worst, we have nothing to lose. And this automatically means we have everything to gain. Willis H. Carrier said: Immediately, I felt a relief and peace that had not experienced for days. Since then, I could think of . It is logical, is not it? However, millions of people have destroyed their lives in furious whirlwinds, because they refused to accept the worst; They refused to improve from here; They refused to save what could be the shipwreck. Instead of trying to rebuild his fortune, they engaged in a harsh and violent struggle with the experience. And they ended up victims of that ruminate fixed ideas called melancholy. Do you want to see how someone else adopted the magic formula of Willis H. Carrier and applied it to their own problems? Well, here's an example, a fuel trader from New York who was a student in one of my classes. This student stated: It was blackmailed! I did not think possible, Part Fundamental Data You Should Know About Concern Live in Compartments Tobacconists " In the spring of 1871 a young man picked up a book and read twenty words had a profound effect on their future. Medical student at the Montreal General Hospital, was concerned about his final exams, what to do, where you go, how a customer would be created, how life would win. The twenty - two words that this young medical student read in 1871 helped him become the most famous physician of his generation. He organized the world - renowned Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. He became Regius Professor of Medicine at Oxford, which is the highest honor that can be awarded to a physician in the British Empire. He was knighted by the King of England. When he died, it took two volumes with 1466 pages to tell the story of his life. His name is Sir William Osler. Here are the twenty words he read in the spring of 1871, the twenty words of Thomas Carlyle that helped him live free of worries: The main thing for us is not to see what is vaguely located far away, but what is clearly hand. Forty-two years later, in a soft spring night when the tulips bloomed in the gardens, Sir William Osler spoke to students at Yale University. He said these students who used to be assumed that a man like him, who had been a professor at four universities and had written a widely read book, had a special quality brain. He stated that this was inaccurate. He said his closest friends knew that his brain was the most mediocre nature. What, then, was the secret of his success? He said that this was due to what he called living in watertight compartments. What did he mean by this? A few months before speaking at Yale, Sir William Osler had crossed the Atlantic in a large ocean liner where the captain standing on the bridge, could push a button and, poof !, a clatter of machinery and various parts of the ship occurred They were isolated from each other , isolated in watertight compartments. And Dr. Osler told students: Now each one of you is a much more marvelous organization than the great liner, and makes a trip longer. What I ask is that you learn to handle the machinery that will allow them to live in watertight compartments day, as the best way to ensure the safety of the trip. Go up to the bridge and see if at least large bulkheads work well. Apretad the button and hear, at every level of your life, the iron gates that close the Past, dead yesterdays. Apretad another button and shut with a metal curtain, the Future, the morning unborn. So you shall be safe, secure for today ... Shut the past! Let the past bury its dead. Close your yesterdays have hastened the march of fools to a sad end ... Take charge today morning coupled with yesterday staggers the most vigorous. The future we close as tightly as the past ... The future is now ... There is no tomorrow. The day of salvation of man is here, now. Waste of energy, mental anguish and nervous disorders hinder the steps of the man who is anxious about the future ... Shut therefore tightly bulkheads fore and aft and Arise to cultivate the habit of a life into watertight compartments up to date. Did you mean Dr. Osler perhaps we should not make any effort to prepare for the future? Not at all. But he went on to say in that speech that the best way to prepare for tomorrow is to focus, with all the intelligence, all the excitement, is to make today's work superbly today. This is the only way one can prepare for the future. Sir William Osler invited Yale students begin the day with the prayer of Christ: Give us this day our daily bread. Remember that this prayer asks for bread alone today. He does not complain of stale bread we ate yesterday and there does not say: Oh, my God! It rained very little lately in the wheat area and we can have another drought. If so, how can I get my bread next fall? Or suppose I lose my job ... Oh, my God! How can I then get my daily bread? No, this prayer teaches us to ask only bread today. Today's bread is the only bread you can eat. Years ago a philosopher penniless wandering through a rocky country where people's life so hard earned. One day , a crowd gathered around at a height. And the philosopher delivered what is probably the most quoted speech of all time: you not, then, must carefully tomorrow, because tomorrow will take care of their own things. Each day brings its quest. Many have rejected these words of Jesus: Do not be tomorrow must carefully. They have rejected these words as a counsel of perfection, as a matter of Eastern mysticism. And they say I have to take care of tomorrow. I have to make sure to protect my family. I have to save money for my old age. I have to establish plans and prepare to get ahead. Of course! This is undeniable. What happens is that those words of Jesus, translated more than three hundred years, does not mean today what it meant during the reign of King James. Three hundred years ago the word care often meant anxiety. Modern versions of the Bible quote Jesus more accurate to say: Do not be anxious about tomorrow. You have to take care of tomorrow by all means, thinking, planning and preparing. But without anxieties. During the war, our military leaders were planning for tomorrow, but could not afford to be outdone by anxiety. Admiral Ernest J. King, who commanded the US Navy, said, I have provided the best men with the best teams and they have pointed out the mission that seems more successful. It is all I can do. He continued: If sink one of our boats, I can not put it afloat. If you are destined to sink, I can not help it . Worth more than devote my time to the problems of tomorrow that angry with yesterday. Besides, if I let these things take over me, I will not last long. In peace or war, the main difference between the mindset good and bad lies in this: good thinking looks at the causes and effects and leads to logical and construction projects; evil thinking often leads to tension and nervous depression. I had the privilege of Arthur Hays Sulzberger visit (1935-1961), editor of one of the most famous newspapers in the world, The New York Times. Sulzberger told me that when World War II engulfed Europe, was so stunned, so worried about the future, I could hardly sleep. He got up many times at midnight, took a cloth and some paintings, he looked in a mirror and tried to portray. He knew nothing about painting, but painted all ways in order to erase from his mind the concerns. Sulzberger also told me he was never able to achieve this and find