57 terms

Literary Terms: Blumberg

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theme
The author's message; a lesson the author wants revealed to a reader.
genre
A type of literature
symbolism
The representation of ideas or qualities
situational irony
involving a situation in which actions have an effect that is opposite from what was intended, so that the outcome is contrary to what was expected.
motif
a distinctive feature or dominant idea in an artistic or literary composition.
motif
Throughout a poem, a man wears a tuxedo for a variety of occasions: his wedding, his father's funeral, and his own daughter's wedding. The repeating tuxedo shows his changing duties as a husband, son, and father as he ages.
situational irony
Aleister Crowley, a famous English mystic of the early twentieth century, who taught that a person could do anything if they mastered their own mind, died of heroin addiction. His death completely contradicts what he taught.
genre
Poem:
symbolism
In Greek mythology, the Gods represented for forces of nature - for example, Poseidon is for the sea. He is extremely powerful, but also wrathful and unpredictable. By telling stories of Poseidon's vengeful fury, the Greeks (who were not great shipbuilders) delivered an explanation about how dangerous the sea can be.
theme
Danger of excessive pride
The risky relationship between humankind and developing technology
theme
The danger of censorship can promote ignorance and, eventually, destroy an individual.
situational irony
he heard the fire engines start up and run, and the salamanders coming to burn Mr. Black's house."
symbolism
"With his numbered 451 on his helmet on his stolid head."
genre
"The toaster spidered out a piece of buttered bread for him."
motif
"He saw himself int er eyes.. (mirror). "How like a mirror, too, her face." "These men were all mirror images of themselves." "Come on now, we're going to build a mirror factory first, and put out outing but mirrors for the next year, and take a good look at ourselves."
allusion
a brief and indirect reference to a person, place, thing or idea of historical, cultural, literary or political significance. It does not describe in detail the person or thing to which it refers.
allegory
a story, poem, or picture that can be interpreted to reveal a hidden meaning, typically a moral or political one. A story within a story. It has a "surface story" and another story hidden underneath.
indirect characterization
the process by which the personality of a fictitious character is revealed by the use of descriptive adjectives, phrases, or thoughts.
direct characterization
irony that is inherent in speeches or a situation of a drama and is understood by the audience but not grasped by the characters in the play.
dramatic irony
the process by which the personality of a fictitious character is revealed through the character's speech, actions, appearance, etc
dramatic irony
In Romeo and Juliet, the audience knows that Juliet is not dead. However, the character, Romeo, does not know which leads to his suicide.
Allusion
You're acting like such a Scrooge!
I didn't have any bus fare, but fortunately some good Samaritan helped me out!
Direct Characterization
The fair protagonist said, "My people will all be free."
Allegory
Seuss wrote The Sneetches as story for racism and other forms of prejudice. The story is all about creatures who are treated as inferior because they don't have stars on their bellies. Like all Dr. Seuss stories, it's written in a child-friendly, playful style, but it still contains an important political message.
Indirect characterization
The protagonist made the orphan girl feel welcome and validated.
direct characterization
"Darkness. He was not happy. He was not happy. He said the words to himself."
Allusion
"Montag stopped eating...he saw their Cheshire Cat smiles burning through the walls of the house."
Allegory
"The fierce whisper of the hot sand through the empty sieve."
Dramatic Irony
Faber believes he is being set up by Montag but audience knows he really thirsts for knowledge.
Indirect Characterization
"Once upon a time..." whispered Montag
flashback
a scene in a movie, novel, etc., set in a time earlier than the main story.
juxtaposition
the fact of two things being seen or placed close together with contrasting effect.
tone
the general character or attitude of a place, piece of writing, situation,
repetition
literary device that repeats the same words or phrases a few times to make an idea clearer
repetition
Celebrated classic children's author Dr. Seuss frequently uses repeating in his quirky and eccentric stories. Below is a selection from One Fish, Two Fish, Red Fish, Blue Fish that demonstrates Dr. Seuss's well-known, one-of-a-kind style:
juxtaposition
All's fair in love and war
Love and war, two opposite concepts, are placed beside one another. The ___________ of love and war serves to show that despite how different the two are, both are characterized by a lack of rules or guidelines.
flashback
A man is about to give a speech to a large audience on biology. Suddenly, he remembers playing with frogs and toads in his backyard as a curious child. He smiles at the memory, and then begins to speak to the audience about a new, groundbreaking finding about frogs.
tone
I'll just swing by your office at 4 tomorrow!
VS
I will meet you in your office tomorrow at 4:00.
repetition
The jet bombers going over, one two, one two, one two."
tone
"Montag...you are looking at a coward. I (Faber) saw the way things were going a long time back. I said nothing. I'm one of the innocents who could have spoken up-but I did not thus becoming guilty myself." (self-accusatory, guilty)
juxtaposition
"It(snake) was dead but it was alive. It could see but it couldn't see." "The hound slept but did not sleep, lived but did not live."
flashback
"the green park a year ago. The thought had been with him many times recently but now he remembered how it was that day in the city park when he had seen that old man in the black suit hide something, quickly in his coat."
internal conflict
conflict within a character i.e. man vs self
personification
an object taking on human qualities
imagery
visually descriptive or figurative language, especially in a literary work.
oxymoron
a figure of speech in which apparently contradictory terms appear in conjunction
limited omniscient point of view
a narrator who has a general idea of society; however, the reader has insight on only his/her thoughts
imagery
The night was black as ever, but bright stars lit up the sky in beautiful and varied constellations which were sprinkled across the astronomical landscape.
internal conflict
A main character's struggle with addiction.
personification
The sun stretched its golden arms, climbed above the mountains, and smiled down on us."
...
The protagonist thought her mother had become only a figment of her imagination since being gone for so long.
oxymoron
That's my adult child. Poor thing still can't get himself into the real adult world.
Act naturally.
It was a bitter sweet ending.
internal conflict
Montag struggles with the expectation of conformity and the desire for change and individuality.
limited omniscient point of view
How immense a figure she was on the stage before him, what a shadow she threw on the wall with her slender body! He felt as if his eye itched-she might blink."
imagery
"Now the dry smell of hay, the motion of the waters, made him think of sleeping fresh hay in a lonely barn..."
personification
"The dress was white and it whispered."
oxymoron
"The trees overhead made a great sound of letting down their dry rain.", "Montag grinned a fierce grin of all men singed and driven back by flame."