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17 terms

The Parts of the Axial & Appendicular Skeletal Systems

These are the classifications of the different parts of the body into either the Appendicular or Axial skeletal system. This is for the CCS Biology I quiz on Monday, February 11th.
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Axial Skeleton
The principal supportive structure of the body & is oriented along its median longitudinal axis
Skull
The protector of the brain; part of the axial system
Vertebrae
Also known as the spinal column; part of the axial system
Rib Cage
This protects the internal organs; part of the axial system
Hyoid Bone
A bone in the neck; the only bone in the human skeleton not articulated to any other bone; part of the axial system
Sternum
Also known as the breastbone; connects to the rib bones via cartilage, forming the rib cage with them; part of the axial system
Appendicular Skeleton
The bones of this skeletal system provide a fairly freely movable frame for the upper and lower limbs
Pectoral Girdle
The set of bones which connect the upper limb to the axial skeleton on each side; part of the appendicular system
Pelvic Girdle
A bony or cartilaginous structure in vertebrates, attached to and supporting the hind limbs or fins; also called the pelvic arch; part of the appendicular system
Bones of the Arms
The different bones of the "upper" limbs; part of the appendicular system
Bones of the Forearms
The collection of bones that make up your forearms; part of the appendicular system
Wrists
Where you were a bracelet or watch; part of the appendicular system
Hands
Where you hold a pencil; where a large majority of your touch sensors are; bones are part of the appendicular system
Thighs
The part of the leg between the hip and the knee; bones are part of the appendicular system
Legs
Limbs of your body used especially for supporting the body and for walking; bones are part of the appendicular system
Feet
Where you where shoes; bones are part of the appendicular system
Fractures & Dislocations
These are more common in the appendicular skeleton, but are more serious in the axial skeleton