Drivers Ed: module 4

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Terms in this set (...)

Traffic control signals
Traffic control signals are devices placed along, beside, or above roadways to guide, warn, and regulate the flow of traffic. All vehicles, as well as motorcycles, bicycles, pedestrians, and other road users must obey the traffic lights, signs, and right-of-way rules that control an intersection.
These are what the colors of traffic lights mean:
These are what the colors of traffic lights mean:

RED—A steady red signal light means STOP. You cannot proceed until the light turns green.
A right turn can be made on a red light ONLY after you stop and yield to pedestrians and vehicles in your path.
A right turn can be made on a red light ONLY after you stop and yield to pedestrians and vehicles in your path. DO NOT turn if there is a posted sign that says NO TURN ON RED.
You may turn left on a red light from a one-way street onto another one-way street if there is no sign prohibiting the left turn.
The blue car approaches a red light intending to turn right. What should the driver do?
Come to a complete stop, wait for cross traffic to pass, and make the turn when it's safe to do so.
RED ARROW
RED ARROW—A red arrow means STOP until the green signal or green arrow appears. A left turn cannot be made against a red arrow.
FLASHING RED
FLASHING RED—A flashing red signal light means exactly the same as a stop sign: STOP. After stopping, proceed when safe and observe the right-of-way rules.
The blue car approaches an intersection with a flashing red traffic light and no other vehicles present. What should the driver do?
Stop the car before entering the intersection, then scan the road and proceed when it's safe.
YELLOW - yellow signal light
YELLOW—A yellow signal light warns you that the red signal is about to appear. When you see the yellow light, you should stop if it can be done so safely. If you can't stop, watch out for vehicles that may enter the intersection when the light changes.
FLASHING YELLOW
FLASHING YELLOW—A flashing yellow signal light warns you to use caution. Slow down and be especially alert.
The blue car approaches an intersection with a flashing yellow traffic light and no other vehicles present. What should the driver do?
Slow down, then scan the road and proceed when it's safe.
YELLOW ARROW
YELLOW ARROW—A yellow arrow indicates that the "protected" turning time period is ending. Be prepared to obey the next signal, which could be a green or red light or the red arrow.
GREEN—A green light means GO
GREEN—A green light means GO, but you must first let any vehicles, bicycles, or pedestrians remaining in the intersection pass before you move ahead.
You can turn left ONLY if you have enough space to complete the turn before any oncoming vehicle, bicycle, or pedestrian becomes a hazard. Left-turning vehicles must ALWAYS yield to vehicles traveling straight.

Do not enter an intersection, even when the light is green, unless you have enough room to safely cross the intersection before the light turns red. If any part of your car is still in the intersection, even due to heavy traffic, you will be cited.
GREEN ARROW
GREEN ARROW—A green arrow means GO, but first you must yield to any vehicle, bicycle, or pedestrian still in the intersection.
GREEN ARROW showing at the same time as a Red Light
GREEN ARROW (showing at the same time as a Red Light)—make sure to yield the right-of-way to vehicles and pedestrians in the intersection. Travel in the direction of the arrow and continue in the proper lane.
TRAFFIC SIGNAL BLACKOUT
TRAFFIC SIGNAL BLACKOUT—If all traffic signal lights stop working due to a power outage, you must come to a complete stop at the intersection and then proceed when all other road users have completely stopped as well. A blacked-out traffic signal should be treated just like a four-way stop intersection.
Green Arrow
Yellow X
Red X
Green Arrow: when driving in a lane with a green arrow over it, you can drive in the lane.
Yellow X: a yellow X means that your lane signal is about to change to red. Prepare to leave the lane safely.
Red X: you must never drive in a lane under a red X. If your lane has red X overhead, it means that the lane is closed in your direction and you must leave the lane to make way for oncoming traffic.
drawbridge signal
Observe the drawbridge signal in the same way you would a regular traffic control.
If the signal is red: make a full and complete stop at the marked line. The bridge is in use and the road is closed to traffic at the time.
If the signal is yellow: stop if possible. If you are not able to stop safely, proceed with caution.
If the signal is green: proceed, but be aware of other travelers on the bridge.
Draw Bridge Ahead
The sign depicted here warns you to slow down and look for a drawbridge signal. Be prepared to stop if you see a yellow flashing light or if the drawbridge signal is red.
What each color means:
What each color means:
RED: red always signifies STOP. This is also the color for DO NOT ENTER and WRONG WAY signs.
GREEN: green signs are used as guide signs and give directional information.
BLUE: blue signs inform drivers about motorist services. Blue signs are also used to indicate parking spots for disabled drivers.
ORANGE: if you see an orange sign, be aware of road construction or work nearby.
BROWN: brown signs give information about recreational facilities and scenic guidance.
YELLOW: yellow signs warn drivers of upcoming hazards or changes in the road.
WHITE: white signs give you information on road regulations.
BLACK: black signs will also give you information on regulations.
What each shape means:
What each shape means:
Octagon: stop signs
Horizontal Rectangle: directional information
Triangle: yield signs
Pennant: no passing zones
Diamond: warns of potential hazards
Vertical Rectangle: typical of regulatory signs
Pentagon: school crossing and other pedestrian warning signs
Round: railroad warning
Crossbuck: railroad crossing is ahead
STOP sign
The eight-sided red STOP sign means that you must come to a complete stop before entering the intersection or passing the crosswalk or white "limit line."
On divided highways, a STOP sign for crossing or turning vehicles is often placed on the island or dividing strip. You must also stop here.
The blue car approaches a four-way stop behind the orange car. The orange car comes to a complete stop, then turns left. What should the driver of the blue car do?
Come to a complete stop, then drive through the intersection when it's safe to do so.
YIELD sign
The triangular red YIELD sign means slow down, be ready to stop, and let traffic crossing your path (including people walking or riding bikes) pass before you proceed. Go only when it is safe.
Square red and white regulatory signs
Square red and white regulatory signs tell you which regulations you must follow. For example, the DO NOT ENTER sign warns that traffic is traveling against you, and is typically used for freeway off-ramps or one-way streets.
WRONG WAY sign
The WRONG WAY sign may be paired with the DO NOT ENTER sign. If you see one or both of these signs, drive to the side and stop. You are driving against traffic. When safe, back out or turn around and go back to the road you were on. (At night, road reflectors will shine red in your headlights when you are going the wrong way.)
A red circle with a red line through it
A red circle with a red line through it always means NO. The picture inside the circle shows what you cannot do. The sign may be shown with or without words under it. This sign indicates that U-turns are not permitted.
A circular sign
A circular sign tells you of an approaching railroad crossing.
A five-sided sign
A five-sided sign tells you there is a school nearby.
A white rectangular sign
A white rectangular sign tells you about important rules you must obey.
regulatory white sign that says "Speed Limit 35"
This is an example of regulatory speed limit sign.
black arrow sign
One-way street.
Left turn yield left on green sign
Yield when making a left turn.
warning signs are yellow and diamond-shaped with black letters or symbols
Many road signs warn you to slow down and watch for hazards or special conditions ahead. Most warning signs are yellow and diamond-shaped with black letters or symbols. The following are common warning signs—all of which must be obeyed.
Construction and maintenance signs
Construction and maintenance signs are used to notify drivers of unusual or potentially dangerous conditions in or near work areas.
Most signs in work areas are diamond-shaped. A few signs are rectangular.
Barricades, vertical panels, drums, cones, and tubes
Barricades, vertical panels, drums, cones, and tubes—these are commonly used devices to alert drivers of unusual or potentially dangerous conditions in highway and street work areas and to guide drivers safely through the work zone. At night they are often equipped with flashing or steady lights. Slow down!
Guide signs
Guide signs have white letters on a green background and provide directional and mileage information to specific destinations.
Recreational signs are rectangular and brown
Recreational signs are rectangular and brown. They indicate places of historical and cultural interest, along with state and federal parks, etc.
Service signs
Service signs are blue and indicate nearby services, including hospitals, call boxes, telephones, restaurants, and rest areas.
active and passive warning devices
Both active and passive warning devices are widely used. Passive signs and active traffic control devices are installed along the roads near railroad tracks to regulate, warn, or guide traffic. They alert drivers to the presence of railroad tracks and the possibility of an approaching train. What follows is a list of various signs and devices that you will see in connection with highway-rail grade crossings.
yellow circular advance warning sign
A yellow circular advance warning sign tells drivers that the road intersects with railroad tracks. It reminds the driver to slow down, look and listen for a train, and be prepared to stop if a train is approaching. Pavement markings on the road near the yellow circular advance warning sign also alert drivers that the road crosses railroad tracks ahead.
Crossbuck sign
The Crossbuck sign is the most common sign at public highway-rail intersections. It has two crossed white boards marked RAILROAD CROSSING. It identifies the crossing and should be treated as a Yield sign. If there is more than one track, a sign below the Crossbuck will indicate the number of tracks present.
stop line painted across the lane on paved roads
A stop line painted across the lane on paved roads identifies a safe place to stop and look for an approaching train.
Drivers or pedestrians coming to railroad crossing must stop within 15 ft from the nearest rail. You cannot proceed if:
• A signal or flagman is warning of an oncoming train or car.
• An oncoming train or car is visible, giving an audible signal, or (given its speed) is too close.
• The crossing gate is closed.
Flashing Red Lights—with bells and gates—
Flashing Red Lights—with bells and gates—are used to close the road when a train approaches. It is illegal to go around the gates. Going around the gates makes the driver legally liable for any deaths, injuries, or damage to property if a collision occurs. DO NOT move forward until the gates are raised and the lights stop flashing as there may be a train approaching on an adjacent track.
WHITE LINES
WHITE LINES painted on the pavement indicate traffic traveling in your direction.
SOLID WHITE LINES
SOLID WHITE LINES indicate the outer edge of a roadway or a separation of lanes in traffic traveling in the same direction. You must not cross over a solid white line unless avoiding a hazard.
DOUBLE SOLID WHITE LINES separate two lanes of traffic going in the same direction. Crossing a double solid white line is prohibited.
YELLOW LINES
YELLOW LINES mark the center of a road used for two-way traffic. You may pass on a two-way road if the yellow centerline is broken. When a solid and a broken yellow line are together, you must not pass if you are driving next to the solid line. Two solid yellow lines mean "no passing." Never drive to the left of these lines.

DO NOT PASS:

You cannot pass when a solid yellow line is on your side.

DO NOT PASS DOUBLE SOLID LINES

No vehicle may pass double solid yellow (or white) lines.

WHEN YOU MAY PASS BROKEN YELLOW LINE:

You may pass if the maneuver can be done safely.
White arrows
White arrows are sometimes painted on the roadway to indicate whether the lane continues ahead, merges, turns, or becomes an exit. These are intended to guide your choice of lane.
CENTER LANE FOR LEFT TURNS:
CENTER LANE FOR LEFT TURNS:

Center lanes for left turns are found in the middle of two-way streets. The lane is marked on both sides by two painted lines—with the inner line broken, and outer line solid. When this lane is available, use it to begin or end left turns or to start permitted U-turns.
REVERSIBLE LANES:
REVERSIBLE LANES:

Reversible traffic lanes are sometimes found on busy highways. They help keep rush-hour traffic from slowing by reversing the direction at certain times of the day. There will be special pavement markings along with signals and/or symbols to indicate this type of lane.
Edge lines
Edge lines are used to outline and separate the outside edge of pavement from the shoulder. Right edge lines are marked with a solid white line and left edge lines are marked with a solid yellow line.
crosswalk
A crosswalk is that part of the pavement where the sidewalk lines would extend across the street, and it is set aside for pedestrian traffic.
Some crosswalks are preceded by white painted lines or the words SLOW PED XING painted in white on the road. Crosswalks without markings are called unmarked crosswalks. Whether or not there are white painted lines, crosswalks exist at most intersections where roadways meet at 90 degree angles and there are one or more sidewalks that would continue over the roadway.
railroad crossings
In front of railroad crossings, the pavement may be marked with a large X and two Rs. A yellow line before the crossing means no passing. White lines on each side of the track show motorists where to stop when a train is approaching.
Yellow lines crossing the road
Yellow lines crossing the road are sometimes used to indicate a school crossing. Yellow markings on the pavement will say SCHOOL XING and be painted in school zones. You should carefully scan for children about to cross or crossing the road when you see these markings.