Drivers Ed: module 5

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Certain individuals may be exempt from the above mentioned licensing rules. The following people can drive if they hold a valid drivers license from another state or country:
Certain individuals may be exempt from the above mentioned licensing rules. The following people can drive if they hold a valid drivers license from another state or country:

Anyone employed by the federal government and driving a government-issued vehicle while on official business or working for a firm under contract with the federal government (there is a 60 day exemption in the latter case).
A non-Florida resident who is at least 16 years of age.
A non-Florida resident who is attending a college or university in the state.
Any person who drives only vehicles such as farm tractors or road construction machines for a temporary period on a highway.
Any non-resident migrant farm worker (even if children are enrolled in state schools).
A non-resident who frequently travels back and forth between his or her home state for work.
Any member of the armed forces or his or her dependant [unless a) he or she claims homestead exemption or b) he or she accepts non-military employment].
An initial step in the licensing process is the application. Your application must include:
An initial step in the licensing process is the application. Your application must include:

A statement affirming that all information included within the application is true.
Your full name and gender.
Both your country of residence and birth.
Your Social Security number.
Proof of your birth date.

Other items to include with the license application:

Your mailing address.

If you have ever been licensed in another state, you need to include information about your record including any suspensions, revocation or refusals, and consent to release your record.

Accurate proof of identification.
Examples of acceptable documents to show as a primary source of identification:
Examples of acceptable documents to show as a primary source of identification:

A certified copy of a U.S. Birth Certificate or Resident Alien Card
A valid license from another state or the District of Columbia
U.S. Certificate or Report of Birth Abroad
Proof of Indian Blood Degree, American Indian Card
A U.S. Passport
U.S. Armed Forces ID Cards
Certificate of Naturalization, Certificate of Citizenship
An alien registration receipt (green card), employment authorization card, a proof of nonimmigrant classification, or order of an immigration judge/officer that allows and you to live and work in the United States.
SOME SECONDARY FORMS OF IDENTIFICATION:
SOME SECONDARY FORMS OF IDENTIFICATION:
There are numerous other forms of identification that can be used in addition to the primary source of identification. These include, but are not limited to:

A baptism certificate that includes a date of birth and place of baptism.
A military ID.
A draft card.
A marriage certificate.
A Social Security card.
A state issued ID (non-drivers license).
false or fictitious name in a drivers license or ID application
According to section 322.212 (5) in Florida Statutes, using a false or fictitious name in a drivers license or ID application is a third degree felony. Anyone who knowingly violates this law faces immediate arrest. The penalties if convicted of this fraudulent act include a fine of up to $5,000 and imprisonment of up to five years. Suspension of the driving privilege for one year will also be included in the penalty.
You can be considered a state resident if:
You can be considered a state resident if:

You register to vote within any Florida county.
You accept employment in the state.
You live in Florida for more than six months at a time.
You file for a homestead exemption.
You enroll your children in any public school.
Class E
For a Class E (non-commercial vehicle) License, applicants must take vision and hearing tests as well as pass a Class E road rules/road signs exam. Any person who holds a valid license from another U.S. state, or from a U.S. possession, Canada or France need only take a vision test unless their driving appears questionable. If you hold a license from Germany or Taiwan, you will be required to take a vision, hearing, and written exam. The driving test can usually be waived.
THE VISION TEST:
THE VISION TEST:

You need to pass a vision test to be eligible for a drivers license and meet the DHSMV vision standards described in previous module "The Driver."
If you need to wear corrective lenses in order to pass the vision test it will be noted on your license. However, if you use telescopic lenses you are not eligible for a drivers license.
THE WRITTEN TEST:
THE WRITTEN TEST:

Most applicants will be required to take an exam testing knowledge of road rules and road signs. Each portion will consist of 20 questions and the applicant will be expected to correctly answer at least 15 questions. For the road sign portion, you will be expected to correctly identify signs by their function, shape, or color. For the road rules section, you must identify Florida traffic laws.
THE DRIVING TEST:
THE DRIVING TEST:

The first aspect of the road test is the vehicle inspection. Your car will be inspected to make sure it is suitable for a road test. You must provide a vehicle with a valid registration to be used during the testing. You will also be required to do the following:

Provide proof of personal injury insurance coverage.
You must be accompanied by a licensed driver at the time of the exam if you do not have a license yourself. However, no person may accompany you and the examiner during the actual driving test.
During the test, you will be expected to complete the following maneuvers:
During the test, you will be expected to complete the following maneuvers:

Turning—you must be able to turn the vehicle around in a 30 to 40 degree space.
Coming to a crossing—you need to show that you are able to get in the correct lane (in the correct gear) and look both ways.
Shifting gears—if you are operating a vehicle with a manual transmission, you need to show that you can shift gears properly.
Following right-of-way rules—this includes proper procedures for sharing the road with emergency vehicles, pedestrians, and other traffic.
Backing—back for a distance of 50 ft at a slow speed without using the rearview mirror.
Parking
Starting and stopping on a grade
Making quick stops—you must be able to prove that you can make this stop from a speed of 20 mph.
Following stop signs and signals
Using turn signals and following through on the turn
Passing other vehicles
Following vehicles from a safe distance
Staying within the proper lane
The following requirements must also be met before a Learners License can be granted:
The following requirements must also be met before a Learners License can be granted:

The applicant must be 15 years old or older (and attending school if under 18).
There must be a consent form with a notarized signature of a parent or guardian (signing in the presence of the examiner is allowed) if the applicant is under 18 years old (stepparents may not sign unless the applicant is legally adopted by the stepparent).
He or she must pass a vision test as well as a road rules/ road signs exam.
He or she must present two forms of identification as well as a Social Security number.
The applicant must have also completed a Traffic Law and Substance Abuse education course.
Operator's Licenses
Operator's Licenses are available for drivers between the ages of 16 and 17. You must have held a Learners License for at least one year without any traffic convictions to receive this type of license.
When applying for an Operator's License, you must show:


A Florida Learners License or a license from another jurisdiction.
Parent or guardian certification that you have completed at least fifty hours of behind-the-wheel drivers training, with ten hours completed at night.

You will be expected to take a driving test unless you can present a waiver from an accepted drivers education course.

Operator's License Restrictions:


If a driver is 16 years old, he or she may only drive between 6 a.m. and 11 p.m., unless accompanied by a licensed driver who is at least 21 years old who is in the front passenger seat, or if traveling for work.

If a driver is 17 years old, he or she may drive between 5 a.m. and 1 a.m., unless accompanied by a licensed driver who is at least 21 years old who is in the front passenger seat, or if traveling for work.
The basic fees for licensing
The basic fees for licensing vary according to the type of license required. Currently, these fees are:
Commercial drivers license—$75
First Florida license or original learners license—$48
Class E License renewal or learners license renewal—$48
Replacement license in case of loss—$25 (no charge if stolen and police report filed)
Other fees may apply. Contact your local DHSMV branch office for more information.
Points
Points are assigned for each infraction and a certain amount of points on your record can cause you to have your driving privileges restricted or revoked.
It is important for teen drivers to note that if 6 points are attached your driving record in a 12 month period, your driving privileges will be automatically restricted to only business—related driving for 12 months or until you turn 18 years old, whichever happens first.
There will be an additional 90 days attached for each point added during the restriction period.

Points for Speeding
15 mph or less over lawful or posted speed limit—3 points
16 mph or more over lawful or posted speed—4 points
Speeding resulting in a collision—6 points

Points for Moving Violations

Moving violation (includes driving during restricted hours)—3 points
Moving violation resulting in a collision—4 points
Reckless driving—4 points
Improper lane change—3 points
Leaving the scene of an accident with more than $50 worth of property damage—6 points

Passing a stopped school bus—4 points
Ignoring a traffic control device —4 points
Having an open container of alcohol—3 points
Child restraint violation—3 points
All other moving violations—3 points
Suspensions
Suspensions

Excessive points will lead to the following suspensions:
12 points within a 12-month period—not more than a 30 day suspension
18 points within an 18-month period—not more than a 3 month suspension
24 points within a 36-month period—not more than a 1 year suspension
highway traffic system and driving environment:
highway traffic system and driving environment: your vehicle, the roadway, other road users, weather conditions, and unexpected hazards.
The purpose of the highway traffic system (HTS) is to facilitate the efficient movement of both people and goods throughout the U.S. Like the blood pumping through your veins, critical to keep your body functioning and healthy, the U.S. highway traffic system works in much the same way—it's a critical infrastructure that helps support U.S. industries and allows you to go virtually anywhere in the continental United States.
Division of Driver Licenses
The Division of Driver Licenses ensures that qualified drivers have the ability to operate a vehicle on state highways. The ultimate goal is to keep standards high and prevent hazardous drivers from operating any motor vehicles.
Division of the Florida Highway Patrol
The Division of the Florida Highway Patrol is an enforcement sector that patrols state highways and ensures the safety of drivers and citizens while on the road.
The Division of Motor Vehicles monitors the sale and registration of vehicles and vessels within the state. This includes keeping records of every car, truck, trailer, motorcycle, and camper that is registered or found on Florida highways. In addition, this division administers the distribution of license plates through county tag agents and tax collectors and enforces mobile home construction standards.
Florida Department of Transportation
The Florida Department of Transportation offers many services that serve the public. The branch of the Safety Office attempts to ensure the safety of Florida highway system users and also assists in emergencies.
Safety Office
Other goals of the Safety Office include the development of safety programs using engineering, education, emergency services, and law enforcement that reduce hazards and collisions for drivers, pedestrians, and other road users. This includes the Community Traffic Safety Teams (CTST) and the Highway Safety Grant Program.
Renewal of Registration or license plates
Renewal of Registration or license plates must occur each year, before or on the birthday of the first listed vehicle owner (registration expire at midnight on this day). During this time, and every time you renew, you must show proof of insurance. Exemptions to this are:

Vehicles owned by companies and corporations and some commercial vehicles—renew yearly by June 30.
Mobile homes—renew yearly by December 31.
Truck-tractors and semi-trailers—renew yearly by December 31.
Speeds
Municipal Speed Areas: 30 mph
Business or Residential Area: 30 mph
Rural Interstate: 70 mph
Limited Access Highways: 70 mph
All Other Roads and Highways: 55 mph
School Zones: 20 mph
You may notice changes to the speed limit as you travel through zones. The maximum speed limit of 55 mph is in effect through much of the state, although conditions may dictate a change in speed. Some rural interstate highways may post an exception to this (where the limit is often 70 mph), but drivers should make sure to be aware of posted limits.
Right-Of-Way
The right-of-way laws in Florida state only who must yield in certain circumstances. However, the community of travelers (drivers, cyclists, motorcyclists, truckers, moped riders, and pedestrians) must all work together to avoid hazardous incidents and collisions.
Drivers approaching a stop sign must yield the right-of-way to all other traffic or pedestrians already at the intersection. When the road is clear, the driver may proceed. If two vehicles reach the intersection at the same time and both sides have a stop sign, the vehicle on the left must yield to the vehicle on the right. For four-way stop intersections, the first vehicle to reach the intersection has the right-of-way and must move first.
Intersections
INTERSECTIONS:

There are two kinds of intersections: open intersections and controlled intersections.
Open Intersections: Open intersections do not have traffic control signs or signals. When a driver approaches this type of intersection, he or she must yield the right-of-way if:

The driver intends to make a left turn and a vehicle is approaching from the opposite direction.
A vehicle is already in the intersection.
The driver intends to enter or cross a state highway from a secondary road.
The driver is entering a paved road from an unpaved road.
When two vehicles reach an open intersection at the same time, the vehicle on the left must yield to the vehicle on the right.
Roundabouts
ROUNDABOUTS:

Roundabouts (sometimes called rotaries) are designed to improve the flow of traffic and reduce collisions. In most cases, drivers are not required to stop, but rather move through the intersection in a counterclockwise direction at a slow speed. Right-of-way is determined by the locations of each vehicle. Drivers traveling towards the roundabout yield to vehicles already moving through the roundabout. However, you should always observe all posted signs to determine who has the right-of-way in each circumstance.
Bike Lanes
BIKE LANES:

When approaching an intersection, drivers should slow down and look for bicyclists and yield to any cyclist already entering the intersection.
If making a turn, you should signal before passing through the bike lane and finish making the turn from the designated right turn lane. If there is no right turn lane, look for cyclists. If there are no cyclists, enter the bike lane at the intersection or driveway.
The blue car approaches a four-way stop. A white car is already stopped to the right of the blue car. What should the driver of the blue car do?
Follow the "first in, first out" rule: come to a complete stop, yield to the white car, then continue.
The blue car approaches a four-way stop at the same time as the white car. What should the driver of the blue car do?
Come to a complete stop, then yield to the white car. The driver of the blue car should yield the right-of-way because he's turning left, while the white car is going straight.
The blue car approaches an intersection displaying a YIELD sign to him, while cross traffic does not have a YIELD sign. What should the driver do
Yield the right-of-way to cross traffic. The YIELD sign instructs the driver to yield to cross traffic.
The blue car approaches a four-way stop at the same time as the white car. What should the driver of the blue car do?
...
nine steps in making a good turn.
According to the Florida Driver's Handbook, there are nine steps in making a good turn. They are listed here:
1. Make up your mind about your turn before you get to the turning point. Turn signals are required when changing lanes. Never make "last minute" turns.
2. If you must change lanes, look behind and to both sides to see where other vehicles are located before making your turn.
3. Move into the correct lane as you near the intersection. The correct lane for the right turn is the lane next to the right edge of the roadway. On a two-lane road with traffic in both directions, an approach for a left turn should be made from near the center line.
4. Signal for at least the last 100 feet before you make your turn. Let other drivers know what you are planning to do.
5. Slow down to a safe turning speed.
6. When you are slowing to make a right turn, the bicyclist you passed may be catching up to you. Search over your shoulder before turning. Yield to bicyclists and pedestrians.
7. Yield to pedestrians who may be crossing your path when turning left. Always scan for pedestrians before starting the turn.
8. Make the turn and stay in the proper lane. Yield the right-of-way to vehicles (including bicycles) coming from the opposite direction.
9. Finish your turn in the proper lane. A right turn should be from the right lane into the right lane of the roadway entered. A left turn may be completed in any lane lawfully available, or safe, for the desired direction of travel.
The blue car approaches a red light intending to turn right. What should the driver do?
Come to a complete stop, wait for cross traffic to pass, and make the turn when it's safe to do so.
tips for passing other vehicles on a roadway.
The Florida Driver's Handbook gives the following tips for passing other vehicles on a roadway.

Stay a safe distance behind the vehicle you want to pass. The closer you get to the vehicle you want to pass, the less you can see ahead. This is especially true when passing trucks, trailers, and other large vehicles.
Before you pull out to pass, check your blind spots and make sure that you have plenty of time and room to pass.
On a two-lane road, tap your horn, or at night flash your headlights to let the other driver know you are passing.
Give your signal before you move into the left lane.
Do not return to the right side of the road until you can see both headlights of the vehicle you passed in your rearview mirror.
You must return to the right side of the road before coming within 200 ft of any vehicle coming from the opposite direction.
The blue car is passing the white car and intends to return to its lane. What should the driver of the blue car do?
Return to his lane only when he can see the front of the white car in his rearview or side view mirror.
Passing on the right
Passing on the right is only legal when there are two or more lanes of traffic moving in the same direction or the vehicle you are passing is making a left turn. Pulling off the roadway to pass on the right is against the law.
traveling in a two-lane road with traffic coming
If traveling in a two-lane road with traffic coming from the opposite direction, you may not pass other vehicles in the following circumstances or else you may be cited. You may even be arrested:

If you are at an intersection.
If a DO NOT PASS or NO PASSING ZONE sign is posted.
If a solid yellow line is on your side of the center line.
When traveling on hills or curves.
When traveling within 100 ft of a bridge, tunnel, rail crossing, or viaduct.
two-second rule
The two-second rule should be used to gauge the appropriate distance between your vehicle and the vehicle in front of you. To do this:

Notice the vehicle ahead of you when it passes a marker such as a sign, mailbox, or other fixed point.
Count (in seconds) the time it takes you to reach the same point.
You are too close if you reach the same point in less than two seconds. Reduce your speed and follow the same procedure to check again.
Adjust the time and distance in poor weather or road conditions or when following a trailer or recreational vehicle. You will need more time to react in these situations.
Safety
Safety first


Check to see that passengers are all safely inside, doors fully closed

Lock the doors and place the key in the ignition

Fasten your seat belt, and make sure all passengers are buckled up

Check the driver seat


Adjust the seat for foot pedal

Adjust for steering wheel reach and hand position

Adjust for good visual lanes

Check seat belts and head restraints

Adjust your seat belt and shoulder harness to ensure that they are firm and comfortable. The seat belts should be worn low and snug on the hips and tight across the shoulder.
Head restraint position should be adjusted to maximize rear and side protection

Check mirrors

Adjust the rearview and side mirrors. Always adjust mirrors after adjusting your seat.
Some rules for parking on a public road:
Some rules for parking on a public road:

Always stop in a legal, secure parking space.
Maneuver as far away from traffic as you can, pulling to the shoulder of the road or close to the curb.
Always park on the right side (except when on a one-way street) not more than a foot away from the curb.
Set the parking brake.
Put the car gear in park for automatic transmission or in reverse for manual transmission.
Turn off the ignition and remove your keys (Florida law states that you must do this) before exiting and locking the car.
Before you open the car door and leave, make sure the road is clear and you are not in danger of being hit by traffic.
If parking at a straight-in parking space, your vehicle should be at the center of the space with no portion protruding into traffic.
When exiting the parking space, check to make sure the road is clear, use your turn signal to indicate your intentions, and yield to any other traffic.

Parking with the vehicle facing downhill with a curb: you must turn your vehicle's front wheels into the curb or, in other words, toward the side of the road. REMEMBER TO SET THE PARKING BRAKE.
Parking with the vehicle facing uphill with a curb: you must turn your vehicle's front wheels away from the curb and let your vehicle roll back until the rear of one front wheel makes contact with the curb. SET THE PARKING BRAKE.

When parking on a hill, if there is no curb, turn the vehicle's front wheels toward the side of the road, so if the brakes fail, the car will roll away from the road and not into the path of other vehicles. This applies to both uphill parking and downhill parking.
When parking on any type of slope, always turn the wheels so that the car will not roll into the street if the brakes fail.

According to the Florida Driver's Handbook, the following parking actions can be considered illegal.

On the roadway side of any vehicle stopped or parked at the edge or curb of a street (double parking)
On a crosswalk
On a sidewalk
In front of a driveway
By yellow curbs painted or where NO PARKING signs are posted
In an intersection
Within 15 ft of a fire hydrant

According to the Florida Driver's Handbook, the following parking actions can be considered illegal.

Within 20 ft of an intersection.
Within 20 ft of the entrance to a fire, ambulance or rescue squad station.
Within 50 ft of a railroad crossing.
On the hard surface of a highway where parking spaces are not marked.
On any bridge, overpass, or in any tunnel.
Within 30 ft of a rural mail box on a state highway between 8 a.m. and 6 p.m.
Within 30 ft of any flashing signal, stop sign or traffic signal.
In such a way that you block or create a hazard for other vehicles.
High-beam headlights
Headlights must be used between sunset and sunrise or if driving in rain, smoke, or fog.
High-beam headlights must not be used if driving towards vehicles within 500 ft or if you are driving behind vehicles within 300 ft. High-beam headlights are best used at speeds of 25 mph or above. They can reveal objects up to 450 ft away.

If a vehicle is approaching you using high-beams, signal by flashing your vehicle's high-beams before switching back to low-beams.
Do not look directly at headlights on oncoming vehicles. Rather, follow the right edge of your lane and check back to observe the other vehicle's position every few seconds.
If you only detect one headlight approaching you from the other direction, stay to the far right of your lane.
Low-beam headlights
Low-beam headlights are for use up to 25 mph. When driving faster than these speeds, it will be more difficult to detect hazards, pedestrians, cyclists, and others. Driving with parking lights rather than headlights is illegal.
There are certain conditions where you should turn on your low-beam headlights:

Any time between sunset and sunrise. This includes the evening and the time before sunrise.
Any time of rain, smoke, or fog.
Expressways (Highway)
Expressways are also called freeways, turnpikes, multi-lane roadways, or interstate highways. These roadways have no stop signs, traffic signals, or railroad crossings. Rather, they offer the fastest way to get from point A to point B.
Before Entering an Expressway

Before you enter the expressway, search the guide signs for the route number and direction or destination.
If you try to enter what you THINK is an entrance ramp, and see red and white signs marked DO NOT ENTER or WRONG WAY, immediately pull over to the edge, turn around, and leave the ramp.
Expressway entrances include three areas: the entrance ramp, the acceleration lane, and the merge area. The entrance ramp allows the driver time to search traffic for flow and traffic gaps and evaluate speed and space requirements before entering. These ramps may be uphill, downhill, or level with the expressway. Each presents a different challenge when trying to search the traffic flow on the expressway.
Entrance Ramp
Entrance Ramp:

This "on-ramp" lane delivers the driver to the acceleration lane and gives the driver time to evaluate highway traffic conditions. You should search ahead for traffic on the ramp as well as for a gap in traffic on the expressway.
Acceleration Lane
Acceleration Lane:

This is the area to get the speed up to or near the speed of traffic on the expressway. The amount of acceleration depends on traffic flow on the expressway.
Merging Area
Merging Area:

This is the area immediately following the acceleration lane generally distinguished by a broken white line which indicates that traffic may flow from this lane and move onto the expressway. Always attempt to merge at the same speed of the traffic. To enter the traffic flow, merge into the correct lane position; turn off the signal and maintain new target area and cushion of space.
Problems When Entering an Expressway:
Problems When Entering an Expressway:

General problems associated with expressway entrances include heavy traffic, short ramps and acceleration lanes. Also, traffic ahead on the ramp may slow or stop abruptly.
Reducing Risk When Entering an Expressway
Reducing Risk When Entering an Expressway

There are several ways to reduce your risks while entering an expressway.
Reducing risk on the entrance ramp:
Reducing risk on the entrance ramp:


Search for the proper entrance

Search ahead and behind you, and traffic on the expressway

Prepare to adjust speed for a blocked ramp

Avoid stopping on ramp
Reducing risk in the acceleration lane:
Reducing risk in the acceleration lane:


Search ahead for a gap on the expressway

Prepare to adjust speed

Pull ahead onto the shoulder if no merge area is available
Reducing risk in merging areas:
Reducing risk in merging areas:


Search ahead and to the side

Prepare to blend speed with traffic

Watch for traffic changing lanes at merge points
yellow panel with the message EXIT ONLY
If a yellow panel with the message EXIT ONLY is on an expressway sign, the lane below the sign will not continue through the interchange. Instead, the lane will go off the road to form a ramp. If you are in a lane posted with an EXIT ONLY sign but do not wish to leave, change lanes or you will be forced to exit.
Exiting has two components:
Exiting has two components:

Deceleration lane—an area where speed can be reduced to exit safely and yield to other drivers. It may be marked with a dashed line on the right, and may be shared with cars entering and exiting the expressway.
Exit ramp—the off-ramp may be level or sharply curved, uphill or downhill. Be sure to adjust speed for the ramp speed limit depending on the sharpness of the curve.
Some special situations include:
Some special situations include:

The common-use "weave" lane can provide both an entrance and an exit for an expressway. Drivers entering the "acceleration" ("weave") lane from the entrance ramp shall yield the right-of-way to exiting traffic.
Short deceleration lane—some deceleration lanes may be shorter than others, requiring you to slow more quickly in these situations. Be sure to check your rear zone for traffic.
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