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27 terms

Craft and Design

A set of flashcards to help you revise for Craft and Design Standard Grade.
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Try Square
Woodworking tool used to mark line at 90 degrees to the edge of the wood.
Try Square
Woodworking tool used to check that corners of something is at 90 degrees.
Marking Gauge
Woodworking tool used to mark lines parallel to the edge of the wood, in the direction of the grain.
Steel Rule
Tool used to measure distances
Red Pine
Softwood that is easy to work with, inexpensive, and has lots of knots.
Spruce
Softwood that is easy to work with, does not split easily, has a lot of resin, and small hard knots.
Cedar
Softwood that is durable and takes a stain well. Expensive for a softwood. Used for shingles and exterior joinery.
Douglas Fir
Softwood that is relatively knot free, strong and long lasting. Used for ladders and general exterior work.
Oak
Hardwood that is very strong and durable, finishes very well, though it is one of the heaviest timbers and required very sharp tools.
Beech
Hardwood that is hard wearing, it is affected less by warping than other timbers. Used for tool handles and benchtops.
Walnut
Hardwood that is hard and dense. It has a tight grain that polishes well to an attractive colour and pattern. Used for prestige car dashboards and gun stocks.
Teak
Hardwood that is easily worked, has natural oils that protect it from moisture. Can be prone to splitting.
Ash
Hardwood that is hard, dense and elastic. Polishes well. Amongst other things it can be used to make bowls and tool handles.
Plywood
Man-made board, constructed from odd numbers of veneers which are layered at 90 degrees to each other. This layering makes it very strong in both directions.
MDF (give the full name)
Medium Density Fibreboard
MDF (describe it)
Man made board which is made by gluing fibres of wood together with water and fire retardant chemicals. This mixture is then pressed tightly between two massive flat plates to set.
Laminboard/Blockboard
Man made board which is made by gluing thin strips of solid timber together, then sandwiching between two veneers to make a broad board that looks solid.
Hardboard
Man made board, similar to MDF in its construction, but a lot less dense. Has one smooth face and one that is rough.
Chipboard
Made up of small chips of wood glued together, often faced with some form of plastic veneer to make it look more attractive. Not suitable for cutting joints with, not does it take a normal screw very well. Often used in flat pack furniture.
Through Housing
A strong joint for shelves and cabinet construction. The housing is visible from the front.
Stopped Housing
A strong joint for shelves and cabinet construction. The housing is not visible from the front.
Rebate Joint or Half Lap Joint
Joint useful for corners of cabinets that aren't very deep. Often found in wooden window frames. One piece it left uncut, the other has a section removed to accommodate the uncut piece.
Dowelled Joint
Can be used to in cabinets at their corners, or for supporting shelves/dividers. The two pieces are joined with a small round piece of wood that fits into a drilled hole on each piece.
Knock Down Fittings
Often used for flat pack furniture, these devices join material quickly without specialist tools and can be dismantled again later.
Cross Halving
Joint used where timber crosses, it is cut so that the pieces interlock and can sit flush with each other. This variation of this joint is used near the middle of the joint.
Corner Halving
Joint used where timber crosses, it is cut so that the pieces face and can sit flush with each other. This variation of this joint is used at the end of the joint.
Mortice and Tenon Joint
A very strong joint that is used commonly in door construction. It has a large gluing area which makes it very strong. Made up of a peg on one piece and a hole in the other. The proper names for the peg and hole make up the name of the joint.