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12 terms

Clouds

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Clouds
a visible collection of tiny water droplets or, at colder temperatures, ice crystals floating in the air above the surface. They are classified by their different shapes and altitudes. Clouds offer important clue to understanding and forecasting weather.
Cirrus
High level cloud, above 18,000 feet. Thin, wispy clouds; looks thin and wispy like feathers.
Cumulus
Mid-level cloud, below 6,000 feet. Puffy white clouds, looks like cotton; grow vertically from a flat base to rounded towers, results in fair weather
Stratus
Low level clouds (up to 6,500 feet) means "to spread out" look like layers or blankets that cover the sky; result in overcast weather and sometimes produce precipitation
Nimbus
a rain cloud; may be used as a prefix or suffix for rain clouds, such as Cumulonimbus
Altocumulus
Medium-size puffy clouds; 6,000 - 20,000 feet
Altostratus
Thin, uniform, layered cloud; 6,000 - 20,000 feet
Cirrocumulus
High altitude, small, wispy, patchy puffy clouds above 18,000 feet
Cirrostratus
High altitude, thin, wispy clouds in layers, above thunderheads, 18,000 feet
Cumulonimbus
Tall cumulus clouds (grow vertically up to 50,000 feet); result in heavy precipitation, especially thunderstorms; nimbus = rain
Stratocumulus
Broad and flat on the bottom, puffy on top. Below 6,000 feet
Fog
a cloud at ground level

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