Terms in this set (89)

  • Huck
    After supper she got out her book and learned me about Moses and the Bulrushers, and I was in a sweat to find out all about him; but by and by she let it out that Moses had been dead a considerable long time; so then I didn't care no more about him, because I don't take no stock in dead people.
  • Huck
    We said there warn't no home like a raft, after all. Other places do seem so cramped up and smothery, but a raft don't. You feel mighty free and easy and comfortable on a raft.
  • Huck
    "All right then, I'll go to hell"—and tore it up.
  • Huck
    You don't know about me, without you have read a book by the name of "The Adventures of Tom Sawyer," but that ain't no matter. That book was made by Mr. Mark Twain, and he told the truth, mainly. There was things which he stretched, but mainly he told the truth.
  • Huck, Tom
    "But how can we do it if we don't know what it is?" "Why blame it all, we've got to do it. Don't I tell you it's in the books?"
  • Pap Mentioned or related: Huck
    "And looky here—you drop that school, you hear? I'll learn people to bring up a boy to put on airs over his own father and let on to be better'n what he is."
  • Huck Mentioned or related: Jim
    "People will call me a low down Abolitionist and despise me for keeping mum—but that don't make no difference. I ain't agoing to tell, and I ain't agoing back there anyways."
  • Jim
    "Yes—en I's rich now come to look at it. I owns myself, en I's wuth eight hund'd dollars. I wisht I had de money, I wouldn' want no mo'."
  • Huck
    I begun to think how dreadful it was, even for murderers, to be in such a fix. I says to myself, there ain't no telling but I might come to be a murderer myself, yet, and then how would I like it?
  • Huck Mentioned or related: Jim
    Jim said it made him all over trembly and feverish to be so close to freedom. Well, I can tell you it made me all over trembly and feverish, too, to hear him, because I begun to get it through my head that he was most free—and who was to blame for it? Why, me.
  • Colonel Sherburn
    The pitifulest thing out is a mob; that's what an army is—a mob; they don't fight with courage that's born in them, but with courage that's borrowed from their mass, and from their officers. But a mob without any man at the head of it, is beneath pitifulness.
  • Huck Mentioned or related: Widow Douglas
    Here she was a-bothering about Moses, which was no kin to her, and no use to anybody, being gone, you see, yet finding a power of fault with me for doing a thing that had some good in it. And she took snuff, too; of course that was all right, because she done it herself.
  • Huck Mentioned or related: Jim
    Jim was most ruined for a servant, because he got stuck up on account of having seen the devil and been rode by witches.
  • Huck Mentioned or related: Pap
    I didn't notice anything at first, but next I did. There was a cross in the left boot-heel made with big nails, to keep off the devil.
  • New Judge Mentioned or related: Pap
    "Look at it, gentlemen and ladies all; take a-hold of it; shake it. There's a hand that was the hand of a hog; but it ain't so no more; it's the hand of a man that's started in on a new life, and'll die before he'll go back. You mark them words—don't forget I said them. It's a clean hand now; shake it—don't be afeard."
  • Pap (rant about "govment")
    Call this a govment! why, just look at it and see what it's like. Here's the law a-standing ready to take a man's son away from him—a man's own son, which he has had all the trouble and all the anxiety and all the expense of raising.
  • Jim Mentioned or related: Huck, Pap
    He's ben shot in de back. I reck'n he's ben dead two er three days. Come in, Huck, but doan' look at his face—it's too gashly.
  • Huck
    But if this woman had been in such a little town two days she could tell me all I wanted to know; so I knocked at the door, and made up my mind I wouldn't forget I was a girl.
  • Huck Mentioned or related: Pap
    If I never learnt nothing else out of pap, I learnt that the best way to get along with his kind of people is to let them have their own way.
  • Huck Mentioned or related: Jim
    He was thinking about his wife and his children, away up yonder, and he was low and homesick; because he hadn't ever been away from home before in his life; and I do believe he cared just as much for his people as white folks does for their'n. It don't seem natural, but I reckon it's so.
  • Huck
    It was enough to make a body ashamed of the human race.
  • Huck Mentioned or related: undertaker
    You could see it was a great satisfaction to the people, because naturally they wanted to know. A little thing like that don't cost nothing, and it's just the little things that makes a man to be looked up to and liked.
  • Jim
    Dat truck dah is trash; en trash is what people is dat puts dirt on de head er dey fren's en makes 'em ashamed.
  • Huck
    But that's always the way; it don't make no difference whether you do right or wrong, a person's conscience ain't got no sense, and just goes for him anyway.
  • Huck Mentioned or related: Jim
    I knowed he was white inside, and I reckoned he'd say what he did say—so it was all right now, and I told Tom I was a-going for a doctor.
  • Huck
    but deep down in me I knowed it was a lie, and He knowed it. You can't pray a lie—I found that out.
  • Tom
    But it's too blame' simple; there ain't nothing to it. What's the good of a plan that ain't no more trouble than that? It's as mild as goose-milk. Why, Huck, it wouldn't make no more talk than breaking into a soap factory.
  • Jim
    Well, den, she ain't got no business to talk like either one er the yuther of 'em. Is a Frenchman a man?
  • Miss Hotchkiss
    Why, sperits couldn't a done better and been no smarter. And I reckon they must a been sperits—because, you know our dogs, and ther' ain't no better; well, them dogs never even got on the track of 'm once! You explain that to me if you can!—any of you!
  • Huck
    But I reckon I got to light out for the Territory ahead of the rest, because Aunt Sally she's going to adopt me and sivilize me, and I can't stand it. I been there before.
  • Huck
    It was fifteen minutes before I could work myself up to go and humble myself to a ******; but I done it, and I warn't ever sorry for it afterwards, neither. I didn't do him no more mean tricks, and I wouldn't done that one if I'd a knowed it would make him feel that way.
  • The Doctor
    He is the thinnest kind of an impostor—has come here with a lot of empty names and facts which he picked up somewheres, and you take them for proofs, and are helped to fool yourselves by these foolish friends here, who ought to know better
  • Huck Mentioned or related: Miss Watson
    Well, nobody could think of anything to do—everybody was stumped, and set still. I was most ready to cry; but all at once I thought of a way, and so I offered them Miss Watson—they could kill her.
  • Pap
    "Tramp—tramp—tramp; that's the dead; tramp—tramp—tramp; they're coming after me; but I won't go. Oh, they're here! don't touch me—don't! hands off—they're cold; let go. Oh, let a poor devil alone!"
  • Huck
    So I reckoned I wouldn't bother no more about it, but after this always do whichever come handiest at the time.
  • Huck Mentioned or related: Shepherdsons (Twain dissing church-goers)
    The Shepherdsons done the same. It was pretty ornery preaching—all about brotherly love, and such-like tiresomeness; but everybody said it was a good sermon, and they all talked it over going home, and had such a powerful lot to say about faith and good works and free grace and preforeordestination, and I don't know what all, that it did seem to me to be one of the roughest Sundays I had run across yet.
  • Huck Mentioned or related: Buck
    I cried a little when I was covering up Buck's face, for he was mighty good to me.
  • Duke
    Tis my fate to be always ground into the mire under the iron heel of oppression. Misfortune has broken my once haughty spirit; I yield, I submit; 'tis my fate. I am alone in the world—let me suffer; can bear it.
  • Huck
    and if I could think up anything worse, I would do that, too; because as long as I was in, and in for good, I might as well go the whole hog.
  • Huck
    "Please take it," says I, "and don't ask me nothing—then I won't have to tell no lies."
  • Huck Mentioned: Jim
    Pap always said it warn't no harm to borrow things if you was meaning to pay them back some time; but the widow said it warn't anything but a soft name for stealing, and no decent body would do it. Jim said he reckoned the widow was partly right and pap was partly right; so the best way would be for us to pick out two or three things from the list and say we wouldn't borrow them any more—then he reckoned it wouldn't be no harm to borrow the others.
  • Huck (ratting Jim out)
    "Let up on me—it ain't too late yet—I'll paddle ashore at the first light and tell." I felt easy and happy and light as a feather right off. All my troubles was gone.
  • Huck Mentioned: Gang in the wreck
    I felt a little bit heavy-hearted about the gang, but not much, for I reckoned if they could stand it I could.
  • Boy Huck meets on the road Mentioned: Jim; referring to him as a thing
    "Well, I RECKON! There's two hunderd dollars reward on him. It's like picking up money out'n the road."
  • Huck Mentioned: Jim
    He wouldn't ever dared to talk such talk in his life before. Just see what a difference it made in him the minute he judged he was about free. It was according to the old saying, "Give a ****** an inch and he'll take an ell."
  • Duke Mentioned: All black people
    "Because Mary Jane 'll be in mourning from this out; and first you know the ****** that does up the rooms will get an order to box these duds up and put 'em away; and do you reckon a ****** can run across money and not borrow some of it?"
  • Huck Mentioned: Mary Jane; she sees the good in black people
    she didn't know HOW she was ever going to be happy there, knowing the mother and the children warn't ever going to see each other no more—and then busted out bitterer than ever, and flung up her hands
  • Tom (Talking about genies)
    "How you talk, Huck Finn. Why, you'd HAVE to come when he rubbed it, whether you wanted to or not."
  • Doctor Mentioned: Jim
    I liked the ****** for that; I tell you, gentlemen, a ****** like that is worth a thousand dollars—and kind treatment, too. I had everything I needed, and the boy was doing as well there as he would a done at home—better, maybe, because it was so quiet; but there I WAS, with both of 'm on my hands, and there I had to stick till about dawn this morning; then some men in a skiff come by, and as good luck would have it the ****** was setting by the pallet with his head propped on his knees sound asleep; so I motioned them in quiet, and they slipped up on him and grabbed him and tied him before he knowed what he was about, and we never had no trouble.
  • Tom Mentioned: Jim
    "They hain't no RIGHT to shut him up! SHOVE!—and don't you lose a minute. Turn him loose! He ain't no slave; he's as free as any cretur that walks this earth!"
  • Huck Mentioned: Widow
    you had to wait for the widow to tuck down her head and grumble a little over the victuals, though there warn't really anything the matter with them
  • Huck
    So I was full of trouble, full as I could be; and didn't know what to do.
  • Huck
    And then think of ME! It would get all around that Huck Finn helped a ****** to get his freedom; and if I was ever to see anybody from that town again I'd be ready to get down and lick his boots for shame. That's just the way: a person does a low-down thing, and then he don't want to take no consequences of it.
  • Aunt Sally
    "But we won't LET you walk—it wouldn't be Southern hospitality to do it. Come right in."
  • Huck (Writing a letter)
    Miss Watson, your runaway ****** Jim is down here two mile below Pikesville, and Mr. Phelps has got him and he will give him up for the reward if you send.
  • Huck
    "I hain't got no money, I tell you. You ask Judge Thatcher; he'll tell you the same."
  • Pap
    "It's a lie. Judge Thatcher's got it. You git it. I want it."
  • Tom
    "It don't make no difference how foolish it is, it's the RIGHT way—and it's the regular way. And there ain't no OTHER way, that ever I heard of, and I've read all the books that gives any information about these things.
  • Jim
    "It's a dead man. Yes, indeedy; naked, too. He's ben shot in de back. I reck'n he's ben dead two er three days. Come in, Huck, but doan' look at his face—it's too gashly."
  • Huck
    "They're in an awful peck of trouble, and—" "WHO is?" "Why, pap and mam and sis and Miss Hooker; and if you'd take your ferryboat and go up there—"
  • Lawyer Levi
    "Set down, my boy; I wouldn't strain myself if I was you. I reckon you ain't used to lying, it don't seem to come handy; what you want is practice. You do it pretty awkward."
  • Huck
    "Well, this is too many for me, Jim. I hain't seen no fog, nor no islands, nor no troubles, nor nothing. I been setting here talking with you all night till you went to sleep about ten minutes ago, and I reckon I done the same. You couldn't a got drunk in that time, so of course you've been dreaming."
  • Pap
    "It's so. You can do it. I had my doubts when you told me. Now looky here; you stop that putting on frills. I won't have it. I'll lay for you, my smarty; and if I catch you about that school I'll tan you good. First you know you'll get religion, too. I never see such a son."
  • Huck (to Miss Watson)
    I asked her if she reckoned Tom Sawyer would go there, and she said not by a considerable sight. I was glad about that, because I wanted him and me to be together.
  • Huck
    There was the Sunday-school, you could a gone to it; and if you'd a done it they'd a learnt you there that people that acts as I'd been acting about that ****** goes to everlasting fire.
  • Huck Mentioned: Tommy Barnes
    When they waked him up he was scared, and cried, and said he wanted to go home to his ma, and didn't want to be a robber any more.
  • Duke
    "Old man," said the young one, "I reckon we might double-team it together; what do you think?"
  • Tom
    "Yes, he's got a father, but you can't never find him these days. He used to lay drunk with the hogs in the tanyard, but he hain't been seen in these parts for a year or more."
  • Huck Mentioned: Buck
    When we got up-stairs to his room he got me a coarse shirt and a roundabout and pants of his, and I put them on. While I was at it he asked me what my name was, but before I could tell him he started to tell me about a bluejay and a young rabbit he had catched in the woods day before yesterday, and he asked me where Moses was when the candle went out. I said I didn't know; I hadn't heard about it before, no way.
  • Tom
    "I'll HELP you steal him!"
  • Tom
    "Gimme a CASE-KNIFE."
  • Huck Mentioned: Aunt Sally
    So I slipped back the one I had, and when she got done counting, she says: "Hang the troublesome rubbage, ther's TEN now!" and she looked huffy and bothered both.
  • Duke
    "No, don't you worry; these country jakes won't ever think of that. Besides, you know, you'll be in costume, and that makes all the difference in the world; Juliet's in a balcony, enjoying the moonlight before she goes to bed, and she's got on her night- gown and her ruffled nightcap. Here are the costumes for the parts."
  • Tom Mentioned: Aunt Sally
    "Why, Aunty, it cost us a power of work - weeks of it - hours and hours, every night, whilst you was all asleep. And we had to steal candles, and the sheet, and the shirt, and your dress, and spoons, and tin plates, and case-knives, and the warming-pan, and the grindstone, and flour, and just no end of things, and you can't think what work it was to make the saws, and pens, and inscriptions, and one thing or another, and you can't think HALF the fun it was."
  • Tom
    "Well, that IS a question, I must say; and just like women! Why, I wanted the ADVENTURE of it; and I'd a waded neck-deep in blood to - goodness alive, AUNT POLLY!"
  • Aunt Sally
    "For the land's sake, what IS the matter with the child? He's got the brain-fever as shore as you're born, and they're oozing out!"
  • Duke
    these Arkansaw lunkheads couldn't come up to Shakespeare; what they wanted was low comedy - and maybe something ruther worse than low comedy, he reckoned.
  • Dauphin
    "Cuss the doctor! What do we k'yer for HIM? Hain't we got all the fools in town on our side? And ain't that a big enough majority in any town?"
  • New Judge (talking about pap)
    The judge he felt kind of sore. He said he reckoned a body could reform the old man with a shotgun, maybe, but he didn't know no other way.
  • Jake Packard
    "But I don't WANT him killed, and I've got my reasons for it."
  • Jake Packard
    Shooting's good, but there's quieter ways if the thing's GOT to be done. But what I say is this: it ain't good sense to go court'n around after a halter if you can git at what you're up to in some way that's jist as good and at the same time don't bring you into no resks. Ain't that so?"
  • Jake Packard
    We'll rustle around and gather up whatever pickins we've overlooked in the staterooms, and shove for shore and hide the truck. Then we'll wait. Now I say it ain't a-goin' to be more'n two hours befo' this wrack breaks up and washes off down the river. See? He'll be drownded, and won't have nobody to blame for it but his own self.
  • Huck about Emmeline
    ..made poetry about all the dead people when she was alive, and it didn't seem right that there warn't nobody to make some about her now she was gone; so I tried to sweat out a verse or two myself, but I couldn't seem to make it go somehow. ..The old lady took care of the room herself, though there was plenty of ******s, and she sewed there a good deal and read her Bible there mostly.
  • Judith Loftus
    "The ****** run off the very night Huck Finn was killed. So there's a reward out for him -- three hundred dollars. And there's a reward out for old Finn, too -- two hundred dollars. You see, he come to town the morning after the murder, and told about it, and was out with 'em on the ferryboat hunt, and right away after he up and left. Before night they wanted to lynch him, but he was gone, you see. Well, next day they found out the ****** was gone; they found out he hadn't ben seen sence ten o'clock the night the murder was done. So then they put it on him, you see; and while they was full of it, next day, back comes old Finn, and went boo-hooing to Judge Thatcher to get money to hunt for the ****** all over Illinois with. The judge gave him some, and that evening he got drunk, and was around till after midnight with a couple of mighty hard-looking strangers, and then went off with them. Well, he hain't come back sence, and they ain't looking for him back till this thing blows over a little, for people thinks now that he killed his boy and fixed things so folks would think robbers done it, and then he'd get Huck's money without having to bother a long time with a lawsuit. People do say he warn't any too good to do it. Oh, he's sly, I reckon. If he don't come back for a year he'll be all right. You can't prove anything on him, you know; everything will be quieted down then, and he'll walk in Huck's money as easy as nothing."
  • Judith Loftus
    I was pretty near certain I'd seen smoke over there, about the head of the island, a day or two before that, so I says to myself, like as not that ******'s hiding over there; anyway, says I, it's worth the trouble to give the place a hunt.
  • Judith Loftus
    You just tell me your secret, and trust me. I'll keep it; and, what's more, I'll help you.
  • Huck
    Pretty soon a spider went crawling up my shoulder, and I flipped it off and it lit in the candle; and before I could budge it was all shriveled up. I didn't need anybody to tell me that that was an awful bad sign and would fetch me some bad luck, so I was scared and most shook the clothes off of me.
  • Huck
    Miss Watson's ******, Jim, had a hair-ball as big as your fist, which had been took out of the fourth stomach of an ox, and he used to do magic with it. He said there was a spirit inside of it, and it knowed everything. So I went to him that night and told him pap was here again, for I found his tracks in the snow. What I wanted to know was, what he was going to do, and was he going to stay? Jim got out his hair-ball and said something over it, and then he held it up and dropped it on the floor.
  • Mary Jane
    I'm going to do everything just as you've told me; and if I don't ever see you again, I sha'n't ever forget you. and I'll think of you a many and a many a time, and I'll PRAY for you, too!"