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5 Written questions

5 Matching questions

  1. Zone
  2. Urban Realm
  3. Blockbusting
  4. Suburb
  5. Mesopotamia
  1. a A subsidiary urban area surrounding and connected to the central city. Many are exclusively residential; others have their own commercial centers or shopping malls.
  2. b Area of a city with a relatively uniform land use
  3. c Region of great cities (e.g Ur and Babylon) located between the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers; chronically the first urban hearth dating to 3500 BCE, and which was founded in the Fertile Crescent.
  4. d Rapid change in the racial composition of residential blocks in American cities that occurs when real estate agents and others stir up fears of neighborhood decline after encouraging people of color to move to previously white neighborhoods. In the resulting outmigration, real estate agents profit through the turnover of properties.
  5. e A spatial generalization of the large, late-twentieth-century city in the United States. It is shown to be a widely dispersed, multicentered metropolis consisting of increasingly independent zones or realms, each focused on its own suburban downtown; the only exception is the shrunken central realm, which is focused on the Central Business District (CBD).

5 Multiple choice questions

  1. Developed by geographer T.G. McGee, a model showing similar land-use patterns among the medium-sized cities of Southeast Asia.
  2. Rivers in present-day China; it was at the confluence of the Huang He and Wei Rivers where chronologically the fourth urban hearth was established around 1500 BCE
  3. a term introduced by american journalist joel garreau in order to describe the shifting focus of urbanization in the united states away from the central business district (CBD) toward the loci of economic activity at the urban fringe (extensive amounts of office and retail space, frew residential areas, modern buildings, less than 30 years old)
  4. The downtown heart of a central city, the CBD is marked by high land values, a concentration of business and commerce and the clustering of the tallest buildings
  5. Theory proposed by Walter Christaller that explains how and where central places in the urban hierarchy should be functionally and spatially distributed with respect to one another.

5 True/False questions

  1. AgoraThe focal point of ancient Roman life combining the functions of the ancient Greek acropolis and agora

          

  2. Primate cityA country's largest city-ranking atop the urban hierarchy-most expressive of the national culture and usually (but not always) the capital as well.

          

  3. Trade AreaA spatial generalization of the large, late-twentieth-century city in the United States. It is shown to be a widely dispersed, multicentered metropolis consisting of increasingly independent zones or realms, each focused on its own suburban downtown; the only exception is the shrunken central realm, which is focused on the Central Business District (CBD).

          

  4. Griffin-Ford modelDeveloped by geographer T.G. McGee, a model showing similar land-use patterns among the medium-sized cities of Southeast Asia.

          

  5. Zoning lawsArea of a city with a relatively uniform land use