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5 Written questions

5 Matching questions

  1. Urban Sprawl
  2. Concentric zone model
  3. Spaces of consumption
  4. Blockbusting
  5. McGee model
  1. a Developed by geographer T.G. McGee, a model showing similar land-use patterns among the medium-sized cities of Southeast Asia.
  2. b Unrestricted growth in many American urban areas of housing, commercial development, and roads over large expanses of land, with little concern for urban planning.
  3. c Rapid change in the racial composition of residential blocks in American cities that occurs when real estate agents and others stir up fears of neighborhood decline after encouraging people of color to move to previously white neighborhoods. In the resulting outmigration, real estate agents profit through the turnover of properties.
  4. d A structural model of the American central city that suggests the existence of five concentric land-use rings arranged around a common center.
  5. e Areas of a city, the main purpose of which is to encourage people to consume goods and services' driven primarily by the global media industry.

5 Multiple choice questions

  1. Outlined by a group of architects, urban planners, and developers from over 20 countries, an urban design that calls for development, urban revitalization, and suburban reforms that create walkable neighborhoods with a diversity of housing and jobs.
  2. The very poorest parts of cities that in extreme cases are not even connected to regular city services and are controlled by gangs or drug lords.
  3. Restricted neighborhoods or subdivisions, often literally fenced in, where entry is limited to residents and their guests. Although predominantly high-income based, in North America gated communities are increasingly a middle-class phenomenon.
  4. The innovation of the city, which occurred independently in five separate hearths
  5. A relatively small, egalitarian village, where most of the population was involved in agriculture. Starting over 10,000 years ago, people began to cluster in agricultural villages as they stayed in one place to tend their crops.

5 True/False questions

  1. SuburbanizationMovement of upper and middle-class people from urban core areas to the surrounding outskirts to escape pollution as well as deteriorating social conditions (perceived and actual). In North America, the process began in the early nineteenth century and became a mass phenomenon by the second half of the twentieth century.

          

  2. Primate cityA country's largest city-ranking atop the urban hierarchy-most expressive of the national culture and usually (but not always) the capital as well.

          

  3. Edge citiesa term introduced by american journalist joel garreau in order to describe the shifting focus of urbanization in the united states away from the central business district (CBD) toward the loci of economic activity at the urban fringe (extensive amounts of office and retail space, frew residential areas, modern buildings, less than 30 years old)

          

  4. Central CityDominant city in terms of its role in the global political economy. Not the world's biggest city in terms of population or industrial output, but rather centers of strategic control of the world economy.

          

  5. Central Business District (CBD)The downtown heart of a central city, the CBD is marked by high land values, a concentration of business and commerce and the clustering of the tallest buildings