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5 Written questions

5 Matching questions

  1. Central City
  2. Sunbelt phenomenon
  3. Zoning laws
  4. informal economy
  5. world city
  1. a Legal restrictions on land use that determine what types of building and economic activities are allowed to take place in certain areas. In the United States, areas are most commonly divided into separate zones of residential, retail, or industrial use.
  2. b Economic activity that is neither taxed nor monitored by a government; and is not included in that government's Gross National Product; as opposed to a formal economy
  3. c The urban area that is not suburban; generally, the older or original city, having the clustering of the newer suburbs.
  4. d Dominant city in terms of its role in the global political economy. Not the world's biggest city in terms of population or industrial output, but rather centers of strategic control of the world economy.
  5. e The movement of millions of Americans from northern and northeastern States to the South and Southwest regions of the US

5 Multiple choice questions

  1. A country's largest city-ranking atop the urban hierarchy-most expressive of the national culture and usually (but not always) the capital as well.
  2. Theory proposed by Walter Christaller that explains how and where central places in the urban hierarchy should be functionally and spatially distributed with respect to one another.
  3. Developed by geographers Ernst Griffin and Larry Ford, a model of the Latin American city showing a blend of traditional elements of Latin American culture with the forces of globalization that are reshaping the urban scene.
  4. A discriminatory real estate practice in North America in which members of minority groups are prevented from obtaining money to purchase homes or property in predominantly white neighborhoods. The practice derived its name from the red lines depicted on cadastral maps used by real estate agents and developers. Today, redlining is officially illegal.
  5. Areas of a city, the main purpose of which is to encourage people to consume goods and services' driven primarily by the global media industry.

5 True/False questions

  1. GentrificationThe rehabilitation of deteriorated, often abandoned, housing of low-income inner-city residents.


  2. Urban RealmA spatial generalization of the large, late-twentieth-century city in the United States. It is shown to be a widely dispersed, multicentered metropolis consisting of increasingly independent zones or realms, each focused on its own suburban downtown; the only exception is the shrunken central realm, which is focused on the Central Business District (CBD).


  3. CommercializationMovement of upper and middle-class people from urban core areas to the surrounding outskirts to escape pollution as well as deteriorating social conditions (perceived and actual). In North America, the process began in the early nineteenth century and became a mass phenomenon by the second half of the twentieth century.


  4. Functional ZonationThe division of a city into different regions or zones for certain purposes of functions


  5. McMansionsHomes referred to as such because of their "super size" and similarity in appearance to other such homes; homes often built in place of tear-downs in American suburbs.