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5 Written questions

5 Matching questions

  1. McMansions
  2. gated communities
  3. Trade Area
  4. Social Stratification
  5. Blockbusting
  1. a Rapid change in the racial composition of residential blocks in American cities that occurs when real estate agents and others stir up fears of neighborhood decline after encouraging people of color to move to previously white neighborhoods. In the resulting outmigration, real estate agents profit through the turnover of properties.
  2. b Restricted neighborhoods or subdivisions, often literally fenced in, where entry is limited to residents and their guests. Although predominantly high-income based, in North America gated communities are increasingly a middle-class phenomenon.
  3. c one of two components, together with agricultural surplus, which enables the formation of cities; the differentiation of society into classes based on wealth, power, production, and prestige
  4. d Region adjacent to every town and city within which its influence is dominant
  5. e Homes referred to as such because of their "super size" and similarity in appearance to other such homes; homes often built in place of tear-downs in American suburbs.

5 Multiple choice questions

  1. The downtown heart of a central city, the CBD is marked by high land values, a concentration of business and commerce and the clustering of the tallest buildings
  2. Unplanned slum development on the margins of cities, dominated by crude dwellings and shelters made mostly of scrap wood, iron, and even pieces of cardboard.
  3. Chronologically the fifth hearth, dating to 2000 BCE
  4. The transformation of an area of a city into an area attractive to residents and tourists alike in terms of economic activity.
  5. Movement of upper and middle-class people from urban core areas to the surrounding outskirts to escape pollution as well as deteriorating social conditions (perceived and actual). In North America, the process began in the early nineteenth century and became a mass phenomenon by the second half of the twentieth century.

5 True/False questions

  1. Zoning lawsArea of a city with a relatively uniform land use

          

  2. new urbanismOutlined by a group of architects, urban planners, and developers from over 20 countries, an urban design that calls for development, urban revitalization, and suburban reforms that create walkable neighborhoods with a diversity of housing and jobs.

          

  3. Urban SprawlA spatial generalization of the large, late-twentieth-century city in the United States. It is shown to be a widely dispersed, multicentered metropolis consisting of increasingly independent zones or realms, each focused on its own suburban downtown; the only exception is the shrunken central realm, which is focused on the Central Business District (CBD).

          

  4. SiteThe internal physical attributes about a place, including its absolute location, its spatial character and physical setting.

          

  5. AgoraIn ancient Greece, public spaces where citizens debated, lectured, judged each other, planned military campaigns, socialized, and traded