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5 Written questions

5 Matching questions

  1. Picture-frame stage
  2. Satiric comedy
  3. High Comedy
  4. Comedy of Manners
  5. Burlesque
  1. a A comic genre evoking so-called intellectual or thoughful laughter from an audience that remains emotionally detached from the play's depiction of the folly, pretense, and incongruity of human behavior.
  2. b A realistic form of comic drama that flourished with seventeenh-century playwrights. Deals with the social relations and sexual intrigues of sophicsticated, intelligent, upper-class men and women, whose verbal fencing and witty repartee produce the prinicipal comic effects. Stereo-typed characters from contemporary life.
  3. c Incongruous imitation of either the style or subject matter of a serious genre, humorous due to the diparity between the treatment and the subject.
  4. d A genre using devisive humor to ridicule human weakness and folly or attack political injustices and incomptetence. Often focuses on ridiculing characters or killjoys, who resist the festive mood of comedy. Such characters, called humors, are often characterized by one dominant personality trait or ruling obsession.
  5. e Developed in the 16th century Italian playhouses, it held the action within an arch, a gateway standing "in front of the scenery". It framed painted scene panels to give the illusion of 3-dimensional perspective although only one seat in the auditorium fully experienced the complete perspective illusion and that seat was reserved for royal patrons. This stage was the norm until the 20th century in Europe.

5 Multiple choice questions

  1. The representation of serious and important actions that lead to a disastrous end for the protagonist.
  2. Post WWII European genre depicting the grotesquely comic plight of human beings thrown by accident into an irrational and meaningless world. Ex. Samuel Beckett's "Wairing for Godot". ("A play about nothing" Jerry Seinfeld would say. LOL)
  3. In classical Greek theater architecture, "the place for dancing", a circular, level performance space at the base of a horseshoe-shaped ampitheater, where twelve, then later fifteen, young, masked, male chorus members sang and danced the odes interspersed between dramatic episodes in a play. Today, it is the ground floor seats in a theater or concert hall.
  4. Separating the auditorium from the raised stage and the world of the play, the architectural picture from or gateway "standing in front of the scenery" in traditional European theaters from the 16th century on.
  5. After 1660 when Charles II was restored to the English throne and reopeed the London playhouses which had been closed by the Puritans, who considered theater immoral.

5 True/False questions

  1. Plot construction waysdirect description, revelation by other characters, self-revelation

          

  2. Slapstick comedyA genre using devisive humor to ridicule human weakness and folly or attack political injustices and incomptetence. Often focuses on ridiculing characters or killjoys, who resist the festive mood of comedy. Such characters, called humors, are often characterized by one dominant personality trait or ruling obsession.

          

  3. flexible theaterarena theater with rising tiers around a central open space

          

  4. purgationthe song for the entrance of the chorus

          

  5. dramatic questionA form of comic drama in which the plot focuses on one or more pairs of young lovers who overcome difficulties to achieve a happy ending (usually marraige).

          

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