20 terms

Drama

STUDY
PLAY

Terms in this set (...)

Play
a story acted out, live and on stage
Conflict
a serious disagreement or argument, typically a protracted one.
Climax
the most intense, exciting, or important point of something; a culmination or apex.
Tragedy
an event causing great suffering, destruction, and distress, such as a serious accident, crime, or natural catastrophe.
Protagonist
a literary character who makes a judgment error that inevitably leads to his/her own destruction.
Tragic Flaw
a vice(such as: greed, power,etc.) possessed by the protagonist that brings about his/her downfall
Dialogue
conversation between two or more people as a feature of a book, play, or movie.
Monologue
a long speech by one actor in a play or movie, or as part of a theatrical or broadcast program.
Soliloquy
an act of speaking one's thoughts aloud when by oneself or regardless of any hearers, especially by a character in a play.
Stage Directions
an instruction in the text of a play, especially one indicating the movement, position, or tone of an actor, or the sound effects and lighting.
Foreshadow
be a warning or indication of (a future event).
Dramatic Irony
the expression of one's meaning by using language that normally signifies the opposite, typically for humorous or emphatic effect.
Metaphor
a figure of speech in which a word or phrase is applied to an object or action to which it is not literally applicable without using like/as
Simile
a figure of speech involving the comparison of one thing with another thing of a different kind, used to make a description more emphatic or vivid using like/as
aside
a short passage spoken in an undertone or addressed to an audience without other characters knowledge.
cast
the actors in a play
acts/scenes
how a play is organized
comedy
a humorous play that ends well
histories
a play based on historic events
Antagonist
character who is assumed a friend by the protagonist, but plots the demise of him/her

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