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85 terms

EOC English 1 Practice

STUDY
PLAY
Allegory
A story or tale with two or more levels of meaning- a literal level and one or more symbolic levels (Animal Farm is an allegory)
Alliteration
The repetition of initial consonant sounds (she sells sea shells)
Allusion (know Classical & Biblical Allusions)
A reference to a well-known person, place, event, literary work, or work of art (Classical allusions are references to Greek / Roman mythology & Biblical allusions are references to the Bible
Anecdote
A brief true story about an interesting, amusing, or strange event told to entertain or make a point
Antagonist
A character or force in conflict with a main character or protagonist
Aside
A short speech delivered by a character in a play in order to express his or her true thoughts and feelings. Aside are presumed unheard by other actors.
Assonance
The repetition of vowel sounds followed by different consonants in two or more stressed syllables (the wide slide would not glide)
Blank Verse
Poetry written in unrhymed iambic pentameter lines (much of Romeo and Juliet is written in this)
Character
A person, animal, or entity in a literary work
Climax
The third park of the PLOT that offers the highest point of action; this is the moment the reader has been waiting for
Comedy
A literary work, especially a play that has a happy ending (Shakespeare's comedies often ended with a marriage)
Comic Relief
A technique that is used to interrupt a serious part of a literary work by introducing a humorous character or situation
Conflict (External & Internal)
A struggle between opposing forces in a literary work. Internal Conflict- a conflict with him or herself
External Conflict- a conflict with a person, animal, natural disaster, or an item
Connotation
Ideas or tone associated with a word. Calling someone a dog has a negative connotation associated with that person's appearance
Denotation
The dictionary meaning of a word
Couplet
A pair of rhyming lines in poetry, usually the same length
Dialect
The form of language spoken in a particular region or group that may involve changes in pronunciation
Dialogue
A conversation between characters
Drama
A story written to be performed on stage, a play
Dramatic Irony
This occurs when the reader or viewer knows something a character does not know
Epic
A long narrative poem about the deeds of gods or heroes who embody a particular civilzation
Exposition
The first part of the plot that introduces the characters, basic situations, and setting
Fiction
Writing that tells about imaginary characters and events
Figurative Language
Writing or speech not meant to be interpreted as literal
Flashback
A means by which an author presents material that occurred earlier than the present tense of the narrative
Foil
A character who provides a contrast to another character, the characters seem to be opposites
Foreshadowing
The use of clues that suggest events that have yet to occur
Free Verse
Poetry not written in a regular patter of meter or rhyme
Genre
A type of literature, genres include mystery, historical fiction, realistic fiction, science fiction, fantasy, and more
Hyperbole
Extreme exaggeration
Idiom
An expression that is characteristic of a language, region, community, or class of people
Imagery
Language that appeals to any of the five senses. Because of the way something is described, a reader can see it, or hear it, or feel it, etc.
Irony
This occurs when a reader expects something and gets the opposite or says something and means the opposite
Metaphor
A comparison of two unlike things NOT using like or as, My love is a rose . . .
Meter
The rhythmical pattern of a poem that is formed with stressed and unstressed syllables
Monologue
A speech by one character that, unlike a soliloquy, is addressed to another character or characters
Mood
The feeling created in the reader
Theme
A central idea of a work of literature that is evident from actions and events in it
Narrative
A fiction, nonfiction, poetic, or dramatic story
Nonfiction
Explains ideas about real people, places, ideas or events
Onomatopoeia
Sound words (pop, ring, sizzle)
Oxymoron
A combination of words that contradict each other, controlled chaos or killing with kindness are examples
Paradox
A statement that seems contradictory but actually may be true, an unexpected insight
Parallelism
The uniformity of grammatical sentence parts
Personification
This occurs when a writer gives human characteristics to non-human objects
Plot
The sequence of events in a story. The plot includes the exposition, rising action, climax, falling action, and resolution
Prose
The ordinary form of written language. Most writing is prose with the exception of poetry, drama, and songs
Protagonist
The main character in a literary work
Pun
A play on words
Quatrain
A stanza or poem made up of four lines, usually with a definite rhythm and rhyme scheme
Repetition
The use of any element of language including a sound, word, phrase, and many more
Resolution
The final part of the plot that brings the story to a close
End Rhyme & Internal Rhyme
The repetition of sounds at the ends of words
Internal Rhyme- rhyme that occurs within the line of poetry
Rhyme Scheme
A regular patter of rhyme
Rhythm
The pattern of beats or stresses
Rising Action
This is the part of plot that leads up to the climax
Satire
A literary work that ridicules the foolishness or faults of individuals
Setting
When and/or where a story takes place
Short Story
A brief work of fiction
Simile
A comparison of two unlike things using like or as
Soliloquy
A long speech expressing the thoughts of a character alone on stage
Sonnet
A fourteen-line lyric poem, usually written in a rhymed iambic pentameter
Stage Directions
Notes included in a drama to describe how the work is to be performed
Stanza
A group of lines in a poem that acts like a paragraph in a poem
Suspense
A feeling of uncertainty about the outcome of events in a literary work
Symbol
Anything that stands for something else, especially a large idea or concept
Tone
The writer's attitude towards his or her work. Readers can recognize the tone by examining the word choice
Tragedy
A work of literature, especially a play, that ends in a disaster or great misfortune. Shakespeare's tragedies often end with a death of a main character
Verbal Irony
Words that suggest the opposite of what is meant
Diction
the author's choice of words
Archetype
A detail, image, or character type that occurs frequently in literature and myth from different cultures throughout the ages.
Autobiography
A writer's account of his or her own life.
Ballad
A narrative poem (that tells a story) and has song-like qualities or is meant to be sung.
Biography
A story of a person's life written by another author.
Aphorism (aka Maxim)
A brief, cleverly worded statement that makes a wise observation about life.
Analogy
A comparison of two different things that are similar in some way.
Character -- Static Character
A character that remains the same throughout a story or novel.
Character -- Dynamic Character
A character that makes a significant change in a story or novel.
Character -- Round Character
A character that is complex and highly developed.
Character -- Flat Character
A character that is not highly developed.
Characterization
The process through which an author reveals the personality of a character.
Characterization -- Indirect characterization
A character's personality is revealed through physical appearance, thoughts, speech, actions, or other characters' thoughts, speech, and actions concerning that character.
Characterization -- Direct characterization
A character's personality is revealed through direct comments about the character's personality from the writer.
Consonance
The repetition of consonants (or consonant patterns) especially at the ends of words. This often appears with alliteration, assonance, and internal rhyme.
Complication
An additional factor or problem introduced into the rising action of a story to make the conflict more difficult.