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104 terms

Renaissance Poetry Final

Renaissance Poetry and some prose: Lanyer, Bacon, Burton, Browne, Herbert, Herrick, Lovelace, Philips, Marvell, Milton
STUDY
PLAY
Eve's Apology in Defense of Women
Aemilia Lanyer
The Description of Cookham
Aemilia Lanyer
To the Virtuous Reader
Aemilia Lanyer
To the Queenes Most Excellent Majesty
Aemilia Lanyer
To the Ladie Anne, Countesse of Dorcet
Aemilia Lanyer
Of Truth
Francis Bacon
Aphorisms from Novum Organum
Francis Bacon
The New Atlantis
Francis Bacon
Democritus Junior to the Reader
Robert Burton
Love Melancholy
Robert Burton
Religio Medici
Sir Thomas Browne
The Altar
George Herbert
Easter Wings
George Herbert
Affliction
George Herbert
Discipline
George Herbert
Prayer
George Herbert
Jordan
George Herbert
Pulley
George Herbert
The Collar
George Herbert
The Windows
George Herbert
The Argument of His Book
Robert Herrick
Delight in Disorder
Robert Herrick
The Bad Season Makes the Poet Sad
Robert Herrick
The Grasshopper
Richard Lovelace
To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time
Robert Herrick
Corinna's Going A-Maying
Robert Herrick
Friendship's Mystery, to my Dearest Lucasia
Katherine Philips
To Mrs. M.A. at Parting
Katherine Philips
The Coronet
Andrew Marvell
To His Coy Mistress
Andrew Marvell
The Mower Against Gardens
Andrew Marvell
The Garden
Andrew Marvell
On the Morning of Christ's Nativity
John Milton
Lycidas
John Milton
"cemented with tears" "a heart alone is such a stone" "each part of my hard heart meets in this frame"
The Altar, George Herbert
"lord, who created man in wealth and store, though foolishly he lost the same" "with thee let me combine, and feel this day thy victory"
Easter Wings, George Herbert
"well, I will change the service, and go seek some other master out. Ah, my dear God! though I am clean forgot, Let me not love thee, if I love thee not"
Affliction, George Herbert
"Church bells beyond the stars heard, the soul's blood, the land of spices; something understood"
Prayer, George Herbert
"I envy no man's nightingale or spring; Nor let them punish me with loss of rhyme, Who plainly say, My God, My King."
Jordan, George Herbert
"Lord, how can man preach thy eternal word? He is a brittle, crazy glass"
The Windows, George Herbert
"Making thy life to shine within the holy preachers, then the light and glory more reverend grows"
The Windows, George Herbert
"I struck the board and cried, 'No more; I will abroad! What? Shall I ever sigh and pine?'"
The Collar, George Herbert
"My lines and life are free, free as the road, Loose as the wind, as large as store. Shall I be still in suit?"
The Collar, George Herbert
"But as I raved and grew more fierce and wild At every word, Methoughts I heard one calling, Child! And I replied, My Lord"
The Collar, George Herbert
"When almost all was out, God made a stay, Perceiving that, alone of all his treasure, Rest in the bottom lay"
The Pulley, George Herbert
"He would adore my gifts instead of me, And rest in Nature, not the God of Nature; So both should losers be"
The Pulley, George Herbert
"Let him be rich and weary, that at least, If goodness lead him not, yet weariness May toss him to my breast"
The Pulley, George Herbert
"O my God; Take the gentle path"
Discipline, George Herbert
"Then let thy wrath remove;/ Love will do the deed:/ For with Love/ Stony hearts will bleed"
Discipline, George Herbert
"Throw away thy rod;/Though man frailties hath,/Thou art God:/Throw away thy wrath"
Discipline, George Herbert
The most devoted of the Sons of Ben, but also showing direct influence of classical poets. Carpe Diem poet. Moves from pastoral to cynical. Writes of May Day festivals. Poems do not seem political but are staunchly anti-Puritan.
Robert Herrick (biography)
"I sing of brooks, of blossoms, birds, and bowers,/Of April, May, of June, and July flowers./ I sing of Maypoles, hock carts, wassails, wakes"
The Argument of His Book, Robert Herrick
"I write of youth, of love, and have access/By these to sing of cleanly wantonness."
The Argument of His Book, Robert Herrick
"I write of hell; I sing (and ever shall)/ Of heaven, and hope to have it after all."
The Argument of His Book, Robert Herrick
"A sweet disorder in the dress/Kindles in clothes a wantonness"
Delight in Disorder, Robert Herrick
"A careless shoestring, in whose tie/I see a wild civility"
Delight in Disorder, Robert Herrick
"Each flower has wept and bowed toward the east/Above an hour since, yet you not dressed"
Corinna's Going A-Maying, Robert Herrick
"Nay, profanation to keep in/Whenas a thousand virgins on this day/Spring, sonner than the lark, to fetch in May"
Corinna's Going A-Maying, Robert Herrick
"Rise, and put on your foliage, and be seen/To come forth, like the springtime, fresh and green"
Corinna's Going A-Maying, Robert Herrick
"Take no care/For jewels for your gown or hair;/Fear not; the leaves will strew/Gems in abundance upon you"
Corinna's Going A-Maying, Robert Herrick
"Come, let us go while we are in our prime,/And take the harmless folly of the time"
Corinna's Going A-Maying, Robert Herrick
"And this same flower that smiles today,/Tomorrow will be dying"
To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time, Robert Herrick
"The glorious lamp of heaven, the sun,/The higher he's a getting,/The sooner will his race be run,/And nearer he's to setting"
To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time, Robert Herrick
"Then be not coy, but use your time,/And while ye may, go marry"
To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time, Robert Herrick
"Poor verdant fool! and now green ice!"
The Grasshopper, Richard Lovelace
"Dull to myself and almost dead to these/My many fresh and fragrant mistresses"
The Bad Season Makes the Poet Sad, Robert Herrick
"But if that golden age would come again,/And Charles here rule as he before did reign"
The Bad Season Makes the Poet Sad, Robert Herrick
"I should delight to have my curls half drowned/In Tyrian dews, and head with roses crowned"
The Bad Season Makes the Poet Sad, Robert Herrick
"Thou best of men and friends! we will create/A genuine summer in each other's breast;/And spite of this cold time and frozen fate/Thaw us a warm seat to our rest"
The Grasshopper, Richard Lovelace
An exalted ideal of female friendship as a Platonic union of souls
Katherine Philips (her main idea)
"Our hearts are doubled by the loss,/....And we whose minds are so much one,/Never, yet ever are alone"
Friendship's Mystery, To My Dearest Lucasia, Katherine Philips
Orinda & Rosania, omits husbands on epitaph
To Mrs. M.A. at Parting, Katherine Philips
"I have examined and do fin,/Of all that favor me/There's none I grieve to leave behind/But only only thee"
To Mrs. M.A. at Parting, Katherine Philips
"To the dull angry world let's prove/There's a religion in our love"
Friendship's Mystery, To My Dearest Lucasia, Katherine Philips
"We have each other so engrossed/That each is in the union lost"
To Mrs. M.A. at Parting, Katherine Philips
"Nay, should we never meet to sense/Our souls would hold intelligence"
To Mrs. M.A. at Parting, Katherine Philips
"Thus our twin souls in one shall grow, And teach the world new love"
To Mrs. M.A. at Parting, Katherine Philips
converted from Church of England to Roman Catholicism, sympathetic to royalists and Puritans, dichotomies that resist resolution, uses classical and pagan imagery
Andrew Marvell (bio & ideas)
wreath is poem for Christ, hindered by the devil, asks God to stomp on it if it is not worthy
The Coronet, Andrew Marvell
"When for the thorns with which I long, too long,/With many a piercing wound,/My Savior's head have crowned"
The Coronet, Andrew Marvell
"Through every garden, every mead,/I gather flowers (my fruits are only flowers)"
The Coronet, Andrew Marvell
"Alas! I find the serpent old,/That, twining in his speckled breast,/About the flowers disguised does fold/With wreaths of fame and interest"
The Coronet, Andrew Marvell
"Had we but world enough, and time,.../We would sit down, and think which way/To walk, and pass our long love's day"
To His Coy Mistress, Andrew Marvell
I would/Love you ten years before the Flood,/ And you should, if you please, refuse/Till the conversion of the Jews"
To His Coy Mistress, Andrew Marvell
"An hundred years should go to praise/ Thine eyes, and on they forehead gaze;"
To His Coy Mistress, Andrew Marvell
"But at my back I always hear/Time's winged chariot hurrying near;/And yonder all before us lie/Deserts of vast eternity"
To His Coy Mistress, Andrew Marvell
"Then worms shall try/That long-preserved virginity,/And your quaint honor turn to dust"
To His Coy Mistress, Andrew Marvell
"The grave's a fine and private place,/But none, I think, do there embrace"
To His Coy Mistress, Andrew Marvell
"Now therefore, while the youthful hue/Sits on thy skin like morning dew,/And while thy willing soul transpires/At every pore with instant fires"
To His Coy Mistress, Andrew Marvell
"Let us roll all our strength and all/Our sweetness up into one ball,/And tear our pleasure with rough strife/Thorough the iron gates of life"
To His Coy Mistress, Andrew Marvell
"Luxurious man, to bring his vice in use,/Did after him the world seduce,/And from the fields the flowers and plants allure,/Where Nature was most plain and pure"
The Mower Against Gardens, Andrew Marvell
"With strange perfumes he did the roses taint;/And flowers themselves were taught to paint"
The Mower Against Gardens, Andrew Marvell
signs of accomplishment are desired even though nature gives them to us anyway; active vs. contemplative life; idealization of isolation; nature is more beautiful than women; ridiculous attempt to make gods seem to want nature more than sex; nature offers up its pleasures; Eden was better with just Adam
The Garden, Andrew Marvell
"No white nor red was ever seen/So amorous as this lovely green"
The Garden, Andrew Marvell
"The luscious clusters of the vine/Upon my mouth do crush their wine.../Ensnared on flowers, I fall on grass"
The Garden, Andrew Marvell
"Such was that happy garden-state,/While man there walked without a mate"
The Garden, Andrew Marvell
Proclaimed himself to be the future author of a great English epic; used myth and archetype; read all books in all languages; wrote companion poems about mirth and melancholy; went from Protestant to Puritanism, religion always in flux; became blind later in life
John Milton (bio)
this poem contains his declaration as a poet, wants to give Christ a really good gift and get there first though humbly, self-correction at end: waiting not acting
On the Morning of Christ's Nativity, John Milton
"Ring out, ye crystal spheres,/Once bless our human ears/ (If ye have power to touch our sense so)"
On the Morning of Christ's Nativity, John Milton
elegy, death of a young student, shepherd: member of the clergy and pastoral, deals with fact of early death, lots of grief but sometimes impartial, classical mythology and religious theology, unnatural event especially for this person, not sunk but risen up
Lycidas, John Milton
"Comes the blind Fury with th' abhorred shears,/And slits the thin-spun life"
Lycidas, John Milton
"Henceforth thou art the Genius of the shore,/In thy large recompense, and shalt be good/To all that wander in that perilous flood"
Lycidas, John Milton
"I humbly wish that yours may light on me:/That so these rude unpollisht lines of mine,Graced by you, may seeme the more divine"
To the Queenes Most Excellent Majestie, Aemilia Lanyer
"Vouchsafe to view that which is seldome seene,/A Womans writing of divinest things"
To the Queenes Most Excellent Majestie, Aemilia Lanyer