29 terms

Late Renaissance Test- Quotable Quotes

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"When I lie tangled in her hair,
And fettered to her eye,
The Gods that wanton in the Air,
Know no such Liberty."
Richard Lovelace-To Althea: From Prison
"I could not love thee, Dear, so much,
Loved I not Honour more."
Richard Lovelace- To Lucasta, On Going to the Wars
"TELL me not, Sweet, I am unkind,
That from the nunnery
Of thy chaste breast and quiet mind
To war and arms I fly.

True, a new mistress now I chase, 5
The first foe in the field;
And with a stronger faith embrace
A sword, a horse, a shield.

Yet this inconstancy is such
As thou too shalt adore; 10
I could not love thee, Dear, so much,
Loved I not Honour more."
Richard Lovelace- To Lucasta, On Going to the Wars
"Drink to me only with thine eyes"
Ben Jonson-Song To Celia
Then, then (methinks) how sweetly flows
That liquefaction of her clothes.
Robert Herrik-Upon Julia's Clothes
"Do more bewitch me than when art
Is too precise in every part. "
Robert Herrik-Delight in Disorder
GATHER ye rosebuds while ye may,
Old time is still a-flying :
Robbert Herrik-To The Virgins, to Make Much of Time
Then be not coy, but use your time, And while ye may, go marry; For having lost but once your prime, You may forever tarry.
Robbert Herrik-To The Virgins, to Make Much of Time
No man is an island,
Entire of itself.
Each is a piece of the continent,
A part of the main.
John Donne-Meditation 17
any man's death diminishes me, because I am involved in mankind, and therefore never send to know for whom the bell tolls; it tolls for thee.
John Donne-Meditation 17
Our two souls therefore, which are one,
Though I must go, endure not yet
A breach, but an expansion,
Like gold to airy thinness beat.
John Donne-A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning
If they be two, they are two so
As stiff twin compasses are two;
Thy soul, the fixed foot, makes no show
To move, but doth, if the other do.

And though it in the center sit,
Yet when the other far doth roam,
It leans and hearkens after it,
And grows erect, as that comes home.

Such wilt thou be to me, who must,
Like th' other foot, obliquely run;
Thy firmness makes my circle just,
And makes me end where I begun.
John Donne-A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning
Thou'rt slave to Fate, chance, kings, and desperate men,
And dost with poison, war, and sickness dwell,
And poppy, or charms can make us sleep as well,
And better than thy stroke ; why swell'st thou then ?
John Donne-Sonnet 10 (Death Be Not)
One short sleep past, we wake eternally,
And Death shall be no more ; Death, thou shalt die.
John Donne-Sonnet 10 (Death Be Not)
Batter my heart, three-person'd God ; for you
As yet but knock ; breathe, shine, and seek to mend ;
That I may rise, and stand, o'erthrow me, and bend
Your force, to break, blow, burn, and make me new.
John Donne-Sonnet 14 (Batter My Heart)
I, like an usurp'd town, to another due,
Labour to admit you, but O, to no end.
John Donne-Sonnet 14 (Batter My Heart)
Yet dearly I love you, and would be loved fain,
But am betroth'd unto your enemy ;
Divorce me, untie, or break that knot again,
Take me to you, imprison me, for I,
Except you enthrall me, never shall be free,
Nor ever chaste, except you ravish me.
John Donne-Sonnet 14 (Batter My Heart)
Go, and catche a falling starre,
Get with child a mandrake root
John Donne-Song
COME live with me, and be my love,
And we will some new pleasures prove
John Donne-The Bait
For thee, thou need'st no such deceit,
For thou thyself art thine own bait :
That fish, that is not catch'd thereby,
Alas ! is wiser far than I.
John Donne-The Bait
How soon hath Time, the subtle thief of youth,
Stolen on his wing my three and twentieth year!
John Milton-Sonnet 7
All is, if I have grace to use it so,
As ever in my great Taskmaster's eye.
John Milton-Sonnet 7
WHEN I consider how my light is spent,
Ere half my days in this dark world and wide,
John Milton-Sonnet 19 (On My Blindness)
His state
Is kingly: thousands at his bidding speed,
And post o'er land and ocean without rest;
They also serve who only stand and wait.'
John Milton-Sonnet 19 (On My Blindness)
Had we but world enough, and time,
This coyness, lady, were no crime.
Andrew Marvell- To His Coy Mistress
But at my back I always hear
Time's wingèd chariot9hurrying near;
And yonder all before us lie
Deserts of vast eternity.
Andrew Marvell- To His Coy Mistress
The grave's a fine and private place,
But none, I think, do there embrace.
Andrew Marvell- To His Coy Mistress
Now let us sport us while we may,
And now, like amorous birds of prey,
Andrew Marvell- To His Coy Mistress
Thus, though we cannot make our sun
Stand still, yet we will make him run.
Andrew Marvell- To His Coy Mistress