Only $35.99/year

BIO 1150 - Chapter 12

Terms in this set (64)

Genetic changes are the fundamental cause of CLL.

Any agent that can disrupt DNA upon exposure is considered an etiologic agent.

Over 80% of patients with CLL have some type of chromosomal abnormality, with trisomy 12 being the most common.differentiate from precursor B cells into mature B cells in the bone marrow.
In the peripheral blood, these cells resemble mature B cells, but they synthesize and release low levels of immunoglobulin (Ig), mutated Igs, or no Ig at all.
They are referred to as B-CLL lymphocytes. B-CLL lymphocytes contain excess proto-oncogene bcl 2. This proto-oncogene bcl 2 is a suppressor of apoptosis (programmed cell death), resulting in long life for the B-CLL cells.

Over 95% of CLL cases involve B cells that have failed to differentiate from precursor B cells into mature B cells in the bone marrow.

In the peripheral blood, these cells resemble mature B cells, but they synthesize and release low levels of immunoglobulin (Ig), mutated Igs, or no Ig at all.

They are referred to as B-CLL lymphocytes. B-CLL lymphocytes contain excess proto-oncogene bcl 2. This proto-oncogene bcl 2 is a suppressor of apoptosis (programmed cell death), resulting in long life for the B-CLL cells.

There is constant proliferation of B-CLL precursor cells in the bone marrow.

The accumulation of B-CLL cells results in crowding of the bone marrow and consequent decreased development of RBCs, WBCs, and platelets.

The proliferation of B-CLL cells also occurs in the lymph nodes and spleen, causing lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly.