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29 terms

Irish Critics

STUDY
PLAY
Waiting for Godot - Declan Kiberd
Beckett's work is undeniably Irish yet is located in a 'no-man's land' between cultures.
Attachment of the plays to an Irish cultural and literary tradition
grounded in an Irish context whilst their surroundings seem de-contextualized.
Waiting for Godot - Bertolt Brecht (Brechtian view)
not sufficiently anchored to a specific cultural movement
Godot will mutate to suit social change in the time and place of its being performed
it will have equal effect in any cultural scenario
Waiting for Godot - Alec Reid
Waiting for Godot is not about waiting. It is waiting and ignorance and impotence and boredom, all made visible and audible on the stage before us.
Waiting for Godot - Vivian Mercier, The Uneventful Event
[Beckett] has achieved a theoretical impossibility - a play in which nothing happens, that yet keeps audiences glued to their seats. whats more since the second act is a subtly different reprise of the first, he has written a play in which nothing happens, twice
The Butcher Boy - Padraig Kirwan, Transatlantic Irishness: Irish and American Frontiers in Patrick McCabe's 'The Butcher Boy'
The Butcher Boy essentially explores the extent to which fabulist story telling can act as a temporary escape from life's often horrific realities.
The Butcher Boy - Linden Peach, Limit and Transgression
mental illness as a Taboo
madness - either poses a threat to the existing order or holds up a mirror to the social order, expressing fundamental and often uncomfortable truths about it
which is Francie?
The Plough and the Stars - Cathy Airth, Making the least of masculine authority
O' Casey criticizes republican or anti-treaty ideology by embodying its rhetoric in failed masculine subjects.
wounds Republican authority by representing militant men as misguided posers
"O'Casey seems to be suggesting that ideal masculinity can only exist in disembodied form. In reality real men will always fall short of such idealized abstract notions and unrealistic standards.
The Plough and the Stars - Seamus Deane
politics, as he knew it was the occasion of his plays; morality was their subject.
The Plough and the Stars - Christopher Murray
it would not be too much to say that O'Casey'splays while dealing with issues of life and death, are invariable and enthusiastically on the side of life.
Bessie: Th' lifes pourin' out o me! (To Nora) I've got this through...through you...through you, you bitch!
The Plough and the Stars - Bessie
Humanist
women suffering for men's ideologies
The Covey: (with hand outstretched, and in a professional tone) Look here, comrade, there's no such thing as an Irishman or an Englishman, or a German or a Turk; were all only human bein's. Scientifically speakin', its all a question of the accidental gatherin' of mollycewles an atoms
The Plough and the Stars - The Covey
Against Ideologies
undermines his own intelligence
The Voice of the Man: it is a glorious thing to see arms in the hands of Irish men...bloodshed is a cleansing and sanctifying thing
The Plough and the Stars - The Voice of the man
glorifying war
Nora: Your vanity 'll be the ruin of you an' me yet
The Plough and the stars - Nora
Vanity
Christopher Murray - It would not be too much to say that O'Casey's plays, while dealing with issues of life and death, are invariably and enthusiastically on the side of life
The Plough and the Stars - Christopher Murray
Humanist
Seamus Deane - politics as he knew it was the occasion of his plays; morality was their subject
The Plough and the Stars - Seamus Deane
Cathy Airth in 'Making the least of masculine authority' - O'Casey seems to be suggesting that ideal masculinity can only exist in disembodied form. In reality real men will always fall short of such idealized abstract notions and unrealistic standards.
The Plough and the Stars - Cathy Airth in 'Making the Least of Masculine Authority'
Estragon: Nothing to be done. Vladimir: i'm beginning to come round to that idea
Waiting for Godot - Estragon and Vladimir
existentialism
Vivian Mercier in 'The Uneventful Event' - [Beckett] has achieved a theoretical impossibility - a play in which nothing happens, that yet keeps audiences glued to their seats. whats more since the second act is a subtly different reprise of the first, he has written a play in which nothing happens, twice.
Waiting for Godot - Vivian Mercier in 'The Uneventful Event'
Alec Reid - Waiting for Godot is not about waiting. It is waiting and ignorance and impotence and boredom, all made visible and audible on the stage before us.
Waiting for Godot - Alec Reid
Declan Kiberd - Beckett's work is undeniably Irish, yet is located in a no mans land between cultures.
grounded in an Irish context whilst their surroundings seem de-contextualized
Waiting for Godot - Declan Kiberd
political view
Bertolt Brecht - not sufficiently anchored to a specific cultural movement
Godot will mutate to suit social change in the time and place of its being performed
equal effect in any cultural scenario
Waiting for Godot - Bertolt Brecht
Patrick McCabe - The reason that I write about small towns is that I love them so much. That's where all human experience is, on a very small canvas.
The Butcher Boy - Patrick McCabe
On small town Ireland
Donna Pots - a boy caught between childhood and adolescence, it is about a culture torn between Irish and English values.
The Butcher Boy - Donna Pots
Padraig Kirwan in 'Transatlantic Irishness: Irish and American frontiers in Patrick McCabes 'The Butcher Boy' - The Butcher Boy essentially explores the extent to which fabulist story telling can act as a temporary escape from life's often horrific realities
The Butcher Boy - Padraig Kirwan
Who the f*** did he think he was - Count Dracula?
The Butcher Boy - Francie on the Doctor
the smell of it turned my stomach
The Butcher Boy - Francie on Mrs Nugent
Patrick McCabe - people have often commented that everyone in the book is either mad or damaged. But you should view them as prisms through which the feelings of society are reflected
The Butcher Boy - Patrick McCabe on 'The Social Fantastic'
The whole town wants him to get what he deserves...awful place...cursing the whole town
The Butcher Boy - The town as an entity in itself
Between being Tiddly's wife and keeping an eye out for the Black and Tans for the gardener I was doing alright in that old school for pigs
The Butcher Boy - Francie
living between reality and fantasy