100 terms

GRE Words (400/400)

From NOVA GRE prep (2010, p. 462) and Google
STUDY
PLAY

Terms in this set (...)

Probity
The quality of having strong moral principles; honesty and decency, integrity.
Problematic
1. Constituting or presenting a problem or difficulty; uncertain.
2. A thing that constitutes a problem or difficulty: "the problematics of artificial intelligence".
Prodigal
1. Spending money or resources freely and recklessly; wastefully extravagant.
2. A person who spends money in a recklessly extravagant way.
Prodigious
1. Remarkably or impressively great in extent, size, or degree; enormous.
2. Unnatural or abnormal; marvelous.
Prodigy
1. A person, esp. a young one, endowed with exceptional abilities.
2. An impressive or outstanding example of a particular quality.
Profligate
1. Recklessly extravagant or wasteful in the use of resources; prodigal.
2. A licentious, dissolute person.
Profound
1. (of a state, quality, or emotion) Very great or intense.
2. The vast depth of the ocean or of the mind.
Profusion
An overabundance or large quantity of something.
Prolific
1. (of a plant, animal, or person) Producing much fruit or foliage or many offspring.
2. (of an artist, author, or composer) Producing many works.
Propensity
An inclination or natural tendency to behave in a particular way.
Proportionate
Being in due proportion; commensurate: "proportionate representation of a minority group".
Propriety
1. The state or quality of conforming to conventionally accepted standards of behavior or morals.
2. The details or rules of behavior considered correct; decorum: "she's a great one for the proprieties".
Prosaic
1. Having the style or diction of prose; lacking poetic beauty.
2. Commonplace, flat; unromantic, uninspired.
Proscribe
1. Forbid, prohibit, esp. by law.
2. Denounce or condemn.
Protuberance
1. A thing that protrudes from something else.
2. The fact or state of protruding.
Pundit
An expert in a particular subject or field who is frequently called on to give opinions about it to the public; a politcally astute person.
Pungent
1. Having a sharply strong taste or smell.
2. (of comment, criticism, or humor) Having a sharp and caustic quality.
Qualms
1. An uneasy feeling of doubt, worry, or fear; a misgiving.
2. A momentary faint or sick feeling.
Quash
1. Reject as invalid, esp. by legal procedure: "his conviction was quashed on appeal".
2. Put an end to; suppress: "a hospital executive quashed rumors that nursing staff will lose jobs".
Querulous
Complaining in a petulant or whining manner: "she became querulous and demanding".
Quixotic
Exceedingly idealistic; unrealistic and impractical: "a vast and quixotic project".
Raconteur
A person who tells anecdotes in a skillful and amusing way; story teller.
Recalcitrant
1. Having an obstinately uncooperative attitude toward authority.
2. A person with such an attitude; stubborn.
Recant
Say that one no longer holds an opinion or belief, esp. one considered heretical; retract: "heretics were burned if they would not recant".
Redoubtable
(of a person) Formidable, esp. as an opponent: "a redoubtable debater".
Refractory
1. Stubborn or unmanageable; obstinate.
2. A substance that is resistant to heat.
Relegate
Consign or dismiss to an inferior rank or position.
Renege
Go back on a promise, undertaking, or contract.
Renounce
1. Formally declare one's abandonment of (a claim, right, or possession); disown.
2. Refuse to recognize or abide by any longer.
Reprehensible
Deserving censure or condemnation; blameworthy.
Reproach
1. Address (someone) in such a way as to express disapproval or disappointment; blame.
2. The expression of disapproval or disappointment.
Reprobate
1. An unprincipled person; miscreant (often used humorously or affectionately).
2. Unprincipled (often used as a humorous or affectionate reproach).
Repudiate
1. Refuse to accept or be associated with; disavow.
2. Deny the truth or validity of.
Requisite
1. Made necessary by particular circumstances or regulations.
2. A thing that is necessary for the achievement of a specified end.
Rescind
Revoke, cancel, or repeal (a law, order, or agreement).
Resolute
Admirably purposeful, determined, and unwavering.
Reticent
Not revealing one's thoughts or feelings readily; reserved.
Retribution
Punishment that is considered to be morally right and fully deserved; reprisal.
Reverent
Feeling or showing deep and solemn respect: "a reverent silence".
Rhapsody
1. An effusively enthusiastic or ecstatic expression of feeling; ecstacy.
2. A free instrumental composition in one extended movement.
Rhetoric
1. The art of effective or persuasive speaking or writing; grandiloquence, elocution.
2. Language designed to have a persuasive or impressive effect on its audience, but often regarded as lacking in sincerity or meaning.
Sanctimonious
(derogatory) Making a show of being morally superior to other people; self-righteous.
Sanction
1. A threatened penalty for disobeying a law or rule.
2. Give official permission or approval for (an action).
Sanguinary
Involving or causing much bloodshed; gory, murderous.
Satiate
Satisfied to the fullest; satiated.
Satire
1. The use of humor, irony, exaggeration, or ridicule to expose and criticize people's stupidity or vices.
2. A play, novel, film, or other work that uses satire.
Schism
1. A split or division between strongly opposed sections or parties, caused by differences in opinion or belief; rift.
2. The formal separation of a church into two churches or the secession of a group owing to doctrinal and other differences.
Secular
1. Denoting attitudes, activities, or other things that have no religious or spiritual basis; worldy: "secular buildings".
2. A secular priest.
Sedulous
(of a person or action) Showing dedication and diligence: "he watched himself with the most sedulous care".
Severance
1. The action of ending a connection or relationship: "the severance and disestablishment of the Irish Church".
2. The state of being separated or cut off.
Skeptical
1. Not easily convinced; having doubts or reservations.
2. Relating to the theory that certain knowledge is impossible.
Solicitous
1. Characterized by or showing interest or concern; considerate: "a solicitous inquiry".
2. Eager or anxious to do something.
Solvent
1. Having assets in excess of liabilities; able to pay one's debts, financially sound.
2. The liquid in which a solute is dissolved to form a solution.
Sophistry
1. The use of fallacious arguments, esp. with the intention of deceiving.
2. A fallacious argument; specious reasoning.
Specious
1. Superficially plausible, but actually wrong: "a specious argument".
2. Misleading in appearance, esp. misleadingly attractive: "a specious appearance of novelty".
Spurious
1. Not being what it purports to be; false or fake: "spurious claims".
2. (of a line of reasoning) Apparently, but not actually valid: "this spurious reasoning results in nonsense".
Squander
1. Waste (something, esp. money or time) in a reckless and foolish manner: "entrepreneurs squander their profits on expensive cars".
2. Allow (an opportunity) to pass or be lost.
Stolid
1. (of a person) Calm, dependable, and showing little emotion or animation.
2. Impassive
Stupefy
1. Make (someone) unable to think or feel properly; dumfound.
2. Astonish and shock.
Stymie
Prevent or hinder the progress of; thwart.
Sullen
1. Bad-tempered and sulky; gloomy.
2. (esp. of water) Slow-moving: "rivers in sullen flood".
Supercilious
Behaving or looking as though one thinks one is superior to others; arrogant.
Superfluous
Unnecessary, esp. through being more than enough.
Surfeit
1. An excessive amount of something: "a surfeit of food and drink".
2. Cause (someone) to desire no more of something as a result of having consumed or done it to excess.
Synthesis
1. Combination or composition, in particular.
2. The combination of ideas to form a theory or system.
Tacit
Understood or implied without being stated.
Temerity
Excessive confidence or boldness; audacity: "no one had the temerity to question his conclusions".
Tenuous
1.Very weak or slight: "the tenuous link between interest rates and investment".
2.Very slender or fine; insubstantial: "a tenuous cloud".
Terse
Sparing in the use of words; abrupt, concise: "a terse statement".
Torpid
1. Mentally or physically inactive; lethargic: "we sat around in a torpid state".
2. (of an animal) Dormant, esp. during hibernation.
Tractable
1. (of a person or animal) Easy to control or influence.
2. (of a situation or problem) Easy to deal with.
Transient
1. Lasting only for a short time; impermanent, temporary.
2. A person who is staying or working in a place for only a short time.
Trenchant
Vigorous or incisive in expression or style; penetrating.
Truculent
Eager or quick to argue or fight; aggressively defiant, savage.
Ubiquitous
Present, appearing, or found everywhere; pervasive, ominpresent: "his ubiquitous influence".
Ulterior
1. Existing beyond what is obvious or admitted; intentionally hidden, covert: "an ulterior motive behind his request".
2. Beyond what is immediate or present; coming in the future: "ulterior pay promised to the mariners".
Untenable
1. (esp. of a position or view) Not able to be maintained or defended against attack or objection: "this argument is clearly untenable".
2. Cannot be achieved
Untoward
Unexpected and inappropriate or inconvenient; perverse: "untoward jokes".
Urbane
(of a person, esp. a man) Suave, courteous, and refined in manner.
Vacillate
Alternate or waver between different opinions or actions; be indecisive.
Venerable
1. Accorded a great deal of respect, esp. because of age, wisdom, or character: "a venerable statesman".
2. (in the Roman Catholic Church) A title given to a deceased person who has attained a certain degree of sanctity.
Veracity
1. Conformity to facts; accuracy: "the veracity of the story".
2. Habitual truthfulness: "his veracity and character".
Verbose
Using or expressed in more words than are needed.
Vernacular
1. The language or dialect spoken by the ordinary people in a particular country or region; common speech.
2. (of language) Spoken as one's mother tongue; not learned or imposed as a second language.
Vex
1. Make (someone) feel annoyed, frustrated, or worried, esp. with trivial matters.
2. Cause distress to: "thou shalt not vex a stranger".
Viable
1. Capable of working successfully; feasible, can survive: "the proposed investment was economically viable".
2. (of a seed or spore) Able to germinate.
Vilify
Speak or write about in an abusively disparaging manner; defame.
Virulent
1. (of a disease or poison) Extremely severe or harmful in its effects; deadly, poisonous.
2. (of a pathogen, esp. a virus) Highly infective.
Vitriolic
A harsh or corrosive in tone; scathing.
Vituperative
Bitter and abusive.
Vivacious
(esp. of a woman) Attractively lively and animated.
Volatile
1. (of a substance) Easily evaporated at normal temperatures.
2. An unstable substance.
Voluminous
1. Occupying or containing much space; large in volume, in particular; bulky, extensive.
2. (of clothing or drapery) Loose and ample.
Voracious
1. Wanting or devouring great quantities of food; hungry: "he had a voracious appetite".
2. Having a very eager approach to an activity.
Wastrel
1. A wasteful or good-for-nothing person; spendthrift.
2. A waif; a neglected child.
Weir
1. A low dam built across a river to raise the level of water upstream or regulate its flow.
2. An enclosure of stakes set in a stream as a trap for fish.
Xenophobia
Intense or irrational dislike or fear of people from other countries.
Yarn
1. Spun thread used for knitting, weaving, or sewing.
2. Tell a long or implausible story.
Zealot
1. A person who is fanatical and uncompromising in pursuit of their religious, political, or other ideals.
2. A member of an ancient Jewish sect aiming at a world Jewish theocracy and resisting the Romans until ad 70.
Zephyr
1. A soft gentle breeze.
2. A fine cotton gingham.