19 terms

Visual Techniques

This set of terms relates to your study of picture book theory.
STUDY
PLAY

Terms in this set (...)

Intimate Distance
The participants are very close to each other OR a participant is very close to the responder. This suggests that the relationship is close.
Personal Distance
The participants are close to each other OR a participant is close to the responder. This is like knowing a person and speaking to them occasionally but not being their best friend.
Social Distance
The participants are clearly separate from each other OR a participant is far away from the responder. This suggests that the relationship is distant and the participants don't know each other well.
Colour (symbolism)
Each colour suggests certain ideas. We should use the colour chart in our books to help.
Gaze: demand
The participant looks directly at the responder. The responder must react in a certain way.
Gaze: offer
The participant does not make direct eye contact with the responder. The responder is not obligated to react in a certain way.
Vectors
Imaginary lines extending from lines created in an image (e.g. pointing) that draw the responder's eye to a particular part of the page.
Reading path
The path your eye takes as you look at an image.
Salience
The largest or most dominant part of the image. This is the thing you look at first. This may be achieved through layout, size or colour.
Given
When an advertisement is divided vertically into two equal halves, the left hand side is the given information or the information the responder already knows.
New
When an advertisement is divided vertically into two equal halves, the right hand side is the new information or the information the composer wants the responder to learn.
Colour (saturation)
High colour saturation (a block of one colour) , especially in colour that doesn't occur naturally, suggests that the content is unrealistic or fake just like the colour. Low colour saturation suggests authenticity or realism.
Modality
When an advertisment is divided in half horizontally, the lower half is the real or true content (high modality) while the top half is the ideal aspects of the advertisement (low modality).
Symbolism
An image or concrete object that is used to represent an abstract idea. For an example, the crucifix is used to represent Christianity. Most symbols are dependent on cultural knowledge. Therefore, only members of that cultural group will comprehend the symbol. This can limit the effectiveness of the symbol. For example, the golden arches, obvious to us as representing McDonalds, won't mean anything for the tribe living in the mountains of Papua New Guinea.
Layout
Where are things situated on the page. How does the reading path, vectors, salience or framing help guide how we read a visual text?
Framing
Outlined shapes, either naturally occuring (e.g. window frame) or man-made (e.g. box) that separate elements of a visual text.
Juxtaposition
The contrast of two things to highlight differences.
Compositional axis
If a text (usually this applies to advertisements) is split across the horizontal axis, the top half is low modality (not real; ideal) while the bottom half is high modality (real; factual; persuasive).
If the text is split along the vertical axis, the left hand side is given (we already knew) and the right side is new information.
Rule of thirds
If a text (usually an advertisement) is divided into 9 equal portions, the most important information is located either in the centre portion or where the dividing lines intersect.