90 terms

AP Lit Final Review

STUDY
PLAY

Terms in this set (...)

Who tells Pip who his benefactor is?
Magwitch
Who Estella marries?
Bently Drummel
Who does Herbert marry
Clara
Who does Joe marry
Biddy
Who does Pip marry
No one
Who does Wemmick marry?
Miss Skiffins
Where has Provis been exiled to?
Australia
If Provis returns and is caught, he will be
executed
Wemmick suggests that Pip and Magwitch go where?
Abroad
Molly was arrested and tried for?
Murder
What does Miss Havisham want with Pip
To give Estella practice
Miss Havisham asks Pip to write _____________________ under her name
I forgive her
While trying to save Miss Havisham, Pip does what to his hands?
Burns
Pip secretly gives money to who?
Herbert
Pip recieves an unsigned note that instructs him to go where?
The marshes
Who attacks Pip and wants to kill him
Orlick
Who pays most of Pip's debts while he is sick?
Joe
With the loss of his "expectations," Pip ________
regains human sympathy
Which characters in the book best represent evil and darkness?
Bently Drummel, Orlick, Compeyson
Who are Estella's parents?
Magwitch and Molly
How is the attempt to smuggle Magwitch out of the country ruined?
Compeyson sabotages
Who rows because Pip's arm is injured?
Startop
Who is Miss Havisham's swindler/fiance who broke her heart?
Compeyson
As Magwitch is dying, Pip tells him who his long lost daughter is, name that daughter
Estella
According to Charles Dickens, the real criminals in society are those who
forsake human emotion
Where and when does the play begin?
Denmark in the Middle Ages
What are some personality traits of Horatio
Supportive, intelligent, discerning, Hamlet's best friend
Which character says, "Something is rotten in the state of Denmark?"
Marcellus
Who is Voltimand
Ambassador from Denmark
In Act 1, scene 2 Hamlet comments on the length of time that has elapsed since his father's death. How long ago does he say it was?
2 months
Of whom does Hamlet say "Frailty, thy name is woman?"
Gertrude
What does the Ghost tell Hamlet in the first act?
Avenge my death
What do Polonius and Laertes warn Ophelia about in Act 1?
Hamlet
What does Polonius want Reynaldo to do in Paris?
Spy on Laertes and stop him if he does anything he shouldn't
What is Rosencrantz and Guildenstern's role in the play?
Hamlet's friends who become pawns to Claudius
What does Polonius believe about Hamlet?
He is crazy because he is in love with Ophelia
Who says of himself and why?"But I am pigeon livered, and lack gall/To make oppression bitter, or ere this/I should have fatted all the region kites/With this slave's offal"
Hamlet because he realizes he is a coward
How does Ophelia come to believe Hamlet is mad?
After he lied to her and tried to stop pursuing her
What is the nature of the players' speeches in Act 2?
They put on a dumb show to trick the king into showing guilt
Why does Hamlet decide it is better "to be"
So he could not be a coward and get revenge
What is the meaning of Hamlet's words "The play thing/Wherein I'll catch the conscience of the king"
The play is where I will catch the king if he is guilty
What is a double entendre
wording that is devised to be understood in two ways, having a double meaning -- having arms vs bearing arms (weapons)
In act 3, to whom does Hamlet say "Give me that man/That is not passion's slave, and I will wear him/In my heart's core"
Horatio
Who says "In second husband let me be accurst,/None wed the second, but who killed the first"
Player Queen
Why does Hamlet not kill Claudius while he is praying?
He needs to make sure Claudius goes to Hell
Who is killed in act 3?
Polonius
To which characters does Hamlet reveal that he is but "mad in craft" and not truly mad?q
Rosencrantz and Guildenstern
In Act 3, scene 2, what does Hamlet say is the name of the play within the play
The Mousetrap
When the ghost appears during the closet scene what does he say?
Get off your mom and kill the king
Why does Hamlet never reach England?
He got kidnapped
Who is Orsic?
A courier in the Danish court
What happens at the beginning of Act 5?
Hamlet talks to the clowns and discovers Ophelia's death
According to the gravedigger, about how old is Hamlet?
30
After learning of Ophelia's death, what does Hamlet say he will do?
Kill Claudius
How does Gertrude meet her death?
She drinks the poison meant for Hamlet
Who has the last word in Hamlet?
Fortinbras
At the end of the play, all of these are dead except
Fortinbras, Horatio, Orsic, Reynaldo
How does Hamlet die?
Laertes cuts him with a poison sword
What are Hamlet's last 4 words?
"The rest is silence"
Foster argues that if you see literary texts through the elements of what?
Memory, Symbol, and Pattern
According to Foster in his chapter "Every Trip is a Quest (Except When it's Not)" the quest consists of which five things?
1. Quester
2. Place to go
3. Stated reason
4. Challenges/Trials along the way
5. Real reason to go
What is the real reason the quester is on his or her quest?
Self knowledge
Therefore when a meal goes well between characters it is an act of _______
Communion
In Foster's analysis of literature patters, "ghosts and vampires are never only about ghosts and vampires" thus these figures in literature stands for ____________
Destruction of innocence, sexuality, way society consumes its victims
Foster explores the use of weather, claiming that "weather is never just weather. It's never just rain" Weather is symbolic, and while symbolic meanings are not fixed, rain and/or water typically symbolize
baptism, ages/seasons
In Foster's chapter "...More Than It's Gonna Hurt You: Concerning Violence" he presents the two types of violence as ___________ and __________
character and narrative
Violence in literature, though, while it is literal, is usually something else. That same punch in the nose in a work of literature may be ____________
Metaphorical
If it can be reduced to one possible meaning, it's not a symbol, it is __________ as seen in Bunyan's The Pilgrim's Progress and Orwell's Animal Farm
Allegory
As Foster states, "for almost all of human history, we've been earthbound." Therefore in his chapter "Flights of Fancy" he argues that when a character flies this symbolically suggests _______
Freedom
In the chapter, "It's All About Sex..." Foster argues that "English professors are not innately prurient. It's just that they can recognize the sexual intentions of writers, who may well have dirty minds." He argues that it was ________ in his 1900 work, The Interpretation of Dreams, who demonstrated the power of the unconsciousness and how it illustrated how "other objects and activities can stand in for sexual organs and sex acts"
Sigmund Freud
In the chapter "If She Comes Up, It's Baptism" Foster takes us back to the symbolic nature of water. Baptism and even travelling on a body of water can symbolically suggest ________
rebirth/new identity
When writers send characters ________, it's so they can run amok
south
publicly criticize someone or something by using ridicule, irony, or sarcasm
lampoon
a thing belonging to a period of time other than it's time, especially when old-fashioned
anachronism
a seemingly self-contradictory statement but may prove to be well founded or true
paradox
concise poem often satirical with a single thought/even, often ending with a turn of events
epigram
the branch of linguistics concerned with meaning
semantics
a conclusion is reached by stating a general principle then applying a specific case
inductive reasoning
a sermon or moralistic lecture
homily
a harsh, discordant, unpleasant-sounding choice and arrangement of sounds
cacophony
a concise statement, often offering advice or an adage
aphorism
substituting a theme of one object for another closely associated with it
metonymy
the same expression, word(s) repeated at the start of 2 or more lines, clauses, or sentences
anaphora
the use of slang or informalities in speech or writing
colloquial
a figure of speech that directly addresses an absent or imaginary person
apostrophe
repeated vowel sounds in words placed near each other, usually on the same or adjacent lines
assonance
figure of balance in which two contrasting ideas are intentionally juxtaposed
antithesis
a detail, image, or character type that occurs frequently in literature and myth
archetype
an expression that can't be understood from the literal meaning of the words in the expression
idiom
having the primary purpose of instruction
didactic