14 terms

The Study of Language Chapter 3

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What is the difference between acoustic phonetics and articulatory phonetics?
Articulatory phonetics deal mainly with how speech is made and acoustic phonetics what happens to that speech i.e. producing sound waves. The main difference therefore is in the in the process of speech.
Bilabials
Sounds formed using both upper and lower lips. (pat, bat, and mat).
Labiodentals
Sounds formed with the upper teeth and the lower lip. (fat and vat).
Dentals
Made with the tongue tip behind the upper front teeth. (thin and bath)
Alveolars
Formed with the front part of the tongue on the alveolar ridge. (top, dip, sit, zoo, and nut)
Palatals
Sounds produced with the tongue and the palate. (shout and child)
Velars
Sounds produced with the back of the tongue against the velum. (kid, kill, car, and cold)
Glottals
Produced with the active use of the tongue and other parts of the mouth. (who and whose).
Stops
Sounds produced by some form of "stopping" of the air stream (very briefly) then letting it go abruptly.
Affricates
When you combine a brief stopping of the air stream with an obstructed release which causes some friction
Nasals
When the velum is lowered and the air stream is allowed to flow out through the nose to produce. (morning, knitting, and name).
Liquids
Formed by letting the air stream flow around the sides of the tongue as the tip of the tongue makes contact with the middle of the alveolar ridge. (red)
Glides
Typically produced with the tongue in motion (or gliding) to or from the position of a vowel and are sometimes called semi-vowels. (wet, yes, and we).
Diphthongs
Consist of a combination of two vowel sounds.