Copyediting Terminology List

Copyediting terminology list for ELANG350
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AA
Short for "author's alteration"; used to indicate changes made by an author on a set of proofs.
all cap
Text printed in FULL CAPITALS.
ampersand
Name of the & character
angle brackets
Name of the < and > characters.
AU
Short for author; used in queries
blind proofing
Proofreading pass in which the proofreader is not supplied with an earlier version of the text against which to compare the current version. Also called "cold proofing."
block quote
Quoted passage set off from the running text. Block quotes are often set in a smaller type size and on a shorter measure than the running text. Also called "extract."
bold
Short for boldface.
braces
Name of the { and } characters; also called "curly brackets."
brackets
Name of the [ and ] characters; also called "square brackets."
bubble
Penciled-in circle or box in which an editor writes a query, comment, or instruction on hard copy.
bulleted list
Vertical list (also called set-off list) in which each item is introduced by a bullet or other graphic character.
caps
Short for capital letters.
change bar
Very thick verticale rule placed in the outer margin of a technical manual to indicate a paragraph that has been revised since the previous edition.
Chicago Style
Editorial preferences specified in the The Chicago Manual of Style.
close paren
Name of the ) character
close up
To delete unwanted horizontal or vertical space.
cross-reference
Phrase that mentions another part of the document or text. Also called x-ref or in-text ref.
curly quotes
Name of the " and "; Also called smart quotes.
dead copy
Manuscript that has been typeset and proofread.
diacritic
Mark that changes the phonetic value of an alphabetical character, Common diacritic marks include the acute accent (á, é), cedilla (ç), circumflex (â, ô), grave accent (è, ì), tilde (ñ, õ), and umlaut or diaeresis (ö, ü).
dingbat
Ornamental character: ♘✉
display type
Large type, used for part titles, chapter titles, headings, and the like.
dot leaders
Row of periods between horizontal entries in a table or list; for example: Annual turnover. . . . . . . . . . 93.4%
ellipsis
Name of the . . . character.
em
Typesetting measurement whose value depends on the size of the type: In 10-point type, an em space is 10 points wide; in 18-point type, an em space is 18 points wide.
em dash
Name of the — character. In manuscripts the em dash is often typed as --.
en
Half an em.
en dash
Name of the - character. An en dash is longer than a hyphen (‐) but shorter than an em dash (—). In manuscripts the en dash is often typed as a hyphen.
end-line hyphen
Hyphen that falls at the end of a line of text. A soft hyphen is dropped in the final copy is the hyphenated word falls on one line; a hard hyphen is always retained no matter how the word falls.
extract
Quoted passage set off from the running text. Extracts are often set in a smaller type size and on a shorter measure than the running text. Also called "block quote."
flush
Positioned at the margin of the text page, either flush left or flush right.
flush and hang
Style of setting indexes and lists. The first line of each entry or paragraph is set flush left, and the remaining lines of the entry are indented.
folio
Page number in typeset text. A drop folio is a page number places at the bottom of a page. A blind folio (also called a suppressed folio) is not printed, although the page is counted in the numbering of the pages; an expressed folio is one that is printed.
font
Characters in a given size and style of a typeface (10-point Courier roman; 12-point Helvetica italics; 14-point Baskerville roman small caps).
footer
One or two lines of copy, such as a chapter title or section title, set at the bottom of each page of a document or book; also called running foot.
full caps
Text to be set in ALL CAPITALS.
hard copy
Printout of a computer file; by extension, any text that appears on paper.
head
Title that indicates the start of a section or subsection of a document or book chapter. Heads are given distinctive typographic treatment (type size, weight; capitalization; set off or run in).
headline style
Capitalization style for heads, display lines, or titles of works in which all words are capitalized except articles (a, an, the), coordinating conjunctions, and prepositions. Alternatively, prepositions shorter than four or five letters are lowercased, and longer prepositions are capitalized. Also called UC/lc.
headnote
Brief introductory or explanatory material that follows a part, chapter, or section title and precedes the running text.
house style
Editorial style preferences expressed by a publisher.
initial cap only
Capitalization style for heads, display lines, and titles of works in which all words are lowercased except those that would be capitalized in a sentence. Also called sentence style.
intercap
Capital letter that appears in the middle of a company or product name (BankAmerica, WordPerfect, MasterCard)
ital
Short for italics
kill
To order the deletion of text or an illustration
leading
[pronounced "ledding."] Linespacing in a printed text, measured in points.
MS
short for manuscript
numbered list
Vertical list in which each item is introduced by a numeral.
on-screen editing
Editing that is performed on a document's computer files rather than on hard copy; also called on-line editing or electronic manuscript (EMS) editing.
open paren
Name of the ( character.
orphan
First line of a paragraph that is stranded at the bottom of a printed page, separated from the remainder or the paragraph by a page break.
PE
Short for printer's error; used to indicate an error made by the typesetter on a set of proofs.
query
Publishing jargon for "question"; used as a verb or a noun.
ragged right
Text aligned at the left margin but not at the right margin.
recto
Right-hand page of a book, magazine, or brochure.
redline
On-screen or hard-copy version of a manuscript that indicates which text has been added or deleted since the previous version. In the redline version, the added text is also called redline, and the deleted text is called strikeout.
roman
Type style used most often in printed materials
run-in text
Text that is not set off on its own line.
running text
Portion of a document consisting of sentences and paragraphs, rather than set-off display lines, tables, and other elements; also called general text or regular running text.
sentence style
Capitalization style for heads, display lines, and titles of works in which all words are lowercased except those that would be capitalized in a sentence. Also called initial cap only.
serial comma
Comma preceding "and" or "or" in a list of items
serif
Short cross line that projects from the main stroke of a printed letter.
small caps
Capital letters slightly shorter and squatter than regular caps.
solidus
Name of the / character; also called slash, slant, or virgule
spine
Backbone of a book that connects the front and back covers. Spine copy usually includes the book title, the author's surname, the publisher's name, and the publisher's logo.
stet
[Latin for "let it stand."] Used to reinstate text that had been marked for deletion.
suspended compound
Set of compound adjectives or nouns in which an element common to all members is not repeated. For example: the fourth-, fifth-, and sixth-graders.
typo
Short for typographical error; a misprint.
UC
Short for uppercase (capital letters).
UC/lc
Short for uppercase and lowercase; used to indicate that display text is to be capitalized according to the headline style--as distinct from text to be set sentence style.
unnumbered list
Vertical list in which items carry neither numbering nor bullets.
verso
Left-hand page of a book, magazine, or brochure.
vetting
Substantive review of a manuscript by an expert in the subject matter; similarly, the checking of a translation by someone who is proficient in both languages.
widow
Short line (i.e., the last few words of a paragraph) stranded at the top of a printed page, separated from the remainder of the paragraph by a page break. Used, more generally, for an orphan as well as for a line that contains only part of a word or a word of three or four characters.