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19 terms

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indulgences
so in the christian religion, there's this place called- you know what screw it. you know this.
john calvin
French, lived 10 July 1509 - 27 May 1564) was an influential French theologian and pastor during the Protestant Reformation. He was a principal figure in the development of the system of Christian theology later called Calvinism. Originally trained as a humanist lawyer, he broke from the Roman Catholic Church around 1530. After religious tensions provoked a violent uprising against Protestants in France, Calvin fled to Basel, Switzerland, where he published the first edition of his seminal work The Institutes of the Christian Religion in 1536.
martin Luther
German theologian who led the Reformation, believed that salvation is granted on the basis of faith rather than deeds (1483-1546) he's the crazy religious guy who spoke against the christian church and used the printing press to spread his ideas.
predestination
in theology, is the doctrine that all events have been willed by God. John Calvin interpreted biblical predestination to mean that God willed eternal damnation for some people and salvation for others.[1] Explanations of predestination often seek to address the so-called "paradox of free will", whereby God's omniscience seems incompatible with human free will. In this usage, predestination can be regarded as a form of religious determinism; and usually predeterminism.
wittenberg
German city & college
geneva
a city in southwestern Switzerland at the western end of Lake Geneva
charles V
French physicist and uathor of Charles's law which anticipated Gay-Lussac's law (1746-1823) was ruler of the Holy Roman Empire from 1519 and, as Charles I, of the Spanish Empire from 1516 until his voluntary retirement
theocracy
a political unit governed by a deity (or by officials thought to be divinely guided)
diet
the act of restricting your food intake (or your intake of particular foods)
sect
a subdivision of a larger religious group
compromise
an accommodation in which both sides make concessions
council of trent
was an Ecumenical Council of the Catholic Church. It is considered to be one of the Church's most important councils.[1] possibly the place where luther got tried
mary tudor
an English dynasty descended from Henry Tudor. the younger of the two surviving daughters of King Henry VII of England and Elizabeth of York, and the younger sister of King Henry VIII of England. She was also queen consort of France through her marriage to Louis XII. The latter was more than 30 years her senior. Following his death, which occurred less than two months after her coronation as his third wife, she married Charles Brandon, 1st Duke of Suffolk. The marriage, which was performed secretly in France, took place without her brother Henry's consent. This necessitated the intervention of Thomas Wolsey and the couple were eventually pardoned by King Henry, although they were forced to pay a large fine.
ignatius of loyola
was a Spanish knight from a local Basque noble family, hermit, priest since 1537, and theologian, who founded the Society of Jesus (Jesuits) and, on 19 April 1541, became its first Superior General.[2] Ignatius emerged as a religious leader during the Counter-Reformation. Loyola's devotion to the Catholic Church was characterized by absolute obedience to the Pope.[3]
thomas cranmer
the Apostle who would not believe the resurrection of Jesus until he saw Jesus with his own eyes. was a leader of the English Reformation and Archbishop of Canterbury during the reigns of Henry VIII, Edward VI and, for a short time, Mary I. He helped build the case for the annulment of Henry's marriage to Catherine of Aragon, which was one of the causes of the separation of the English Church from union with the Holy See. Along with Thomas Cromwell, he supported the principle of Royal Supremacy, in which the king was considered sovereign over the Church within his realm.
teresa of avila
Spanish mystic, Roman Catholic saint, Carmelite nun, writer of the Counter Reformation, and theologian of contemplative life through mental prayer. She was a reformer of the Carmelite Order and is considered to be a founder of the Discalced Carmelites along with John of the Cross.
elizabeth
Queen of England from 1558 to 1603 daughter of Henry VIII and Anne Boleyn; she succeeded Mary I (who was a Catholic) and restored Protestantism to England; during her reign Mary Queen of Scots was executed and the Spanish Armada was defeated.
ghetto
a poor densely populated city district occupied by a minority ethnic group linked together by economic hardship and social restrictions
canonize
(Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox Church) the act of admitting a deceased person into the canon of saints