Chapter 5 Oceanography

Terms in this set (48)

Describe what condition exists in water molecules to make them dipolar.

The straight geometry of the water molecule gives a slight positive charge to the oxygen side of the water molecule and a slight negative charge to the hydrogen side of the water molecule. This slight separation of charges gives the entire molecule an electrical polarity, so water molecules are monopoles.

The straight geometry of the water molecule gives a slight overall negative charge to the side of the oxygen atom and a slight overall positive charge to the side of the hydrogen atoms. This slight separation of charges gives the entire molecule an electrical polarity, so water molecules are dipolar.

The bent geometry of the water molecule gives a slight overall negative charge to the oxygen side of the molecule and a slight overall positive charge to the hydrogen side of the molecule. This slight separation of charges gives the entire molecule an electrical polarity, so water molecules are dipolar.

The bent geometry of the water molecule gives a slight overall positive charge to the side of the oxygen atom and a slight overall negative charge to the side of the hydrogen atoms. This slight separation of charges gives the entire molecule an electrical polarity, so water molecules are dipolar.

The bent geometry of the water molecule gives a slight negative charge to the oxygen side of the water molecule and a slight positive charge to the hydrogen side of the water molecule. This slight separation of charges gives the entire molecule an electrical polarity, so water molecules are monopoles.
What condition of salinity makes it possible to determine the total salinity of ocean water by measuring concentration of only one constituent, the chloride ion?


Seawater has a constancy of composition, so the concentration of several major constituents can be measured to determine the total salinity of a given water sample. The constituents that occur in the greatest abundance and are the easiest to measure accurately are the sodium and chloride ions.

Seawater has a constancy of composition, so the concentration of a single major constituent cannot be measured to determine the total salinity of a given water sample. Rather, salinity must be measured in each location individually.

Seawater has a constancy of composition in terms of the major constituents, so the concentration of a single major constituent can be measured to determine the total salinity of a given water sample. The constituent that occurs in the greatest abundance and is the easiest to measure accurately is the chloride ion.

Seawater has a constancy of composition, so the concentration of a single major constituent can be measured to determine the total salinity of a given water sample. The constituent that occurs in the greatest abundance and is the easiest to measure accurately is the sodium ion.

Seawater has a constancy of composition, so the concentration of a single major constituent can be measured to determine the total salinity of a given water sample. The constituent that occurs in the greatest abundance and is the easiest to measure accurately is the iodine ion.
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