Politics in the Media

Terms in this set (185)

- the life blood of politics is money: allows you to get the media attention you want, do campaigning
- Mark Hanna was McKinley's political advisor
- McKinley was from Ohio
- he was very patriotic about Ohio
- wealthy
- strong supporter of Garfield, but he wasn't truly responsible for that
- then Mckinley comes along (he was a labor lawyer defending labor laws)... Republican member of congress (governor of Ohio) and Hanna became his booster and almost single-handingly funded the primary campaign
- Hanna went to NY (headquarters for campaign was in Chicago and NY) and became the money guy
- Charles Dawes: wealthy, young, made it big in natural gas, from Chicago (evanston), part of McKinley's team to get Illinois delegates to vote for him, he ran "campaign for education" new standards for printed materials (flyers, posters, newspaper articles sent out to Republican friendly newspapers... materials in 16 different languages to reach minorities)
- Dawes in charge of spending the money given by Hanna
- Hanna went to NY based corporations (started with Rockefeller and said we have to win this election, if we don't we will face economic disaster.. see Bryan's game plan)
- William Jennings Bryan: populist party nominee, got the nomination based on a speech he gave at a convention, called the cross of gold about how the gold standard was killing the working class/agricultural class
- Bryan personally traveled tens of thousands of miles ... ended up being a close election, even with him not having a lot of money (only Democratic publisher to support Bryan was William Randolph Hearst most were big business and supported McKinley)
- Bryan wanted more money in circulation/ available for working class, wanted currency on silver standard because silver was more plentiful .... but if you put more money into the economy you increase inflation
-McKinley paid for his press through the money donated by the big corporations
** system made into a science: money is life blood of politics
- Stevenson hated TV but the scene in one of his ads (set in his living room) was based off the set of Nixon's checkers speech (looked like library)
- showed what television can do, reaching people from their living room
- Nixon was VP running mate of Eisenhower then, made a name for himself as an outspoken opponent of communism (Nixon was the conservative view compared to Eisenhower who could almost swing either way)
- Nixon was new rule as attack dog: talking about how corrupt the Truman administration was (high gov officials in scandal)
- story in Democratic newspaper about a fund that was paying for Nixon's travel, fund was not unethical or secret, but the story treated it as though it was
- New York Hearld Tribune editorial said Nixon should pull his name from the VP ticket
- Eisenhower didn't speak up for him or comment on it
- Republican party said they would pay for time for him to go on the air, assumed he would use that time to say he was stepping off the ticket, same day story on Stevenson having a similar fund broke, Nixon goes on the air with speech and attacks Stevenson and took a little shot at Eisenhower
- He said it would be morally wrong if any of the $18,000 went to his personal use, if he did the contributors favors or if it was done secretly...that normally when charged with something candidates admit to it generally without detail or deny it wholeheartedly... but he would not be doing that
- then after revealing a lot of his personal bank account info (how much he makes, loans he has) he gets to Check speech ...
- after he got nomination... he did get one gift, man heard his kids talking about how they'd love a dog, and then he heard from Union Station in Baltimore that there was a package for him... it was a Cocker Spaniel dog named Checkers. And, he said his kids loved it, so no, he was not going to get rid of it
- after the speech he said send a telegram to Republican party telling them what he should do, stay or get off the ticket
- over ⅔ said stay! only .4% said get off.
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