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151 terms

500 Words for the SAT: 101-250

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cordial
(adj) friendly; welcoming; gracious
corporeal
(adj) having to do with the body or the physical world
corroborate
(verb) support with evidence; tell the same story; confirm
criteria
(noun) requirements or standards used to make a decision
cryptic
(adj) hidden; secret; mysterious
culpable
(adj) guilty; blameworthy
cupidity
(noun) greed, especially for money
cursory
(adj) quickly and incompletely done; superficial
daunted
(adj) dismayed; disheartened; discouraged (made less courageous)
decadence
(noun) moral decay or decline
defame
(verb) to say things harmful to a person's reputation; malign; vilify
deference
(noun) the act of yielding to someone else out of respect
denounce
(verb) criticize; condemn
depleted
(verb) emptied; drained; used up
deplore
(verb) to express regret or disapproval; complain; criticize
deprecate
(verb) disapprove; belittle
deride
(verb) to make fun of; ridicule
despondent
(adj) feeling hopeless or depressed
destitute
(adj) poor; lacking possessions
dexterity
(noun) high level of skill, especially with the hands; adroitness
despot
(noun) tyrant
desultory
(adj) lacking a plan; aimless
diatribe
(noun) a bitterly critical speech
digress
(verb) to move away from the main topic when writing or speaking; to go off on a tangent
dilatory
(adj) causing lateness; stalling
discerning
(adj) insightful; perceptive
disclose
(verb) provide information; reveal
discord
(noun) disagreement; dissonance
discourse
(noun) exchange of ideas; conversation
disdain
(noun) a feeling of scorn or contempt
disparage
(verb) to say negative things; belittle
disparate
(adj) different
disperse
(verb) spread around; scatter
dissent
(verb) to disagree, especially with the majority, or with an authority
dissolution
(noun) separation into parts; the process of dissolving
distended
(adj) swollen; extended
divergence
(noun) the act of splitting off into different directions
diverse
(adj) different; various
dogmatic
(adj) sticking to long-held beliefs, even when faced with contrary evidence; closed-minded
doleful
(adj) extremely sad
eclectic
(adj) choosing from many different sources; carefully selective
eccentric
(adj) different from most, especially in personality or behavior
efface
(verb) erase
efficacy
(noun) the ability to produce the desired results
effervescence
(noun) the quality of being bubbly or full of life
elated
(adj) extremely happy; overjoyed
eloquence
(noun) powerfully effective speech
embellish
(verb) to make more beautiful; decorate; adorn
endorse
(verb) promote; recommend
emulate
(verb) imitate
endemic
(adj) native to a particular country or among a particular group
enervate
(verb) to sap the strength; weaken
enhance
(verb) intensify; improve
enigma
(noun) mystery; puzzle
enmity
(noun) mutual hatred
ephemeral
(adj) temporary; short-lived
eradicate
(verb) remove completely and permanently; exterminate
erratic
(adj) unpredictable; differing from what is normal or expected
erudition
(noun) the knowledge acquired through many years of study
esoteric
(adj) known to, or understood by, a limited group of people
ethereal
(adj) heavenly; fine; delicately beautiful
eulogize
(verb) to praise highly; to extol
euphemism
(noun) a word or phrase that's used to make an unpleasant idea sound better
evasive
(adj) tending to avoid giving direct answers
exacerbate
(verb) to make a bad situation worse
expurgate
(verb) to remove offensive words, ideas, or symbols; censor
exalt
(verb) raise in rank; elevate; praise
expunge
(verb) erase
extemporaneous
(adj) done without planning; improvised
extol
(verb) praise
extraneous
(adj) unnecessary; irrelevant
extricate
(verb) to free from a trap or difficult situation; to disentangle
exuberant
(adj) uncontrollably joyous
fallacious
(adj) false; misleading
fastidious
(adj) difficult to please
fickle
(adj) lacking loyalty; unpredictably changeable; erratic
fervor
(noun) strong passion
flaccid
(adj) lacking firmness; soft; limp
flagrant
(adj) openly and obviously evil; glaring; conspicuous
fledgling
(noun) beginner
flippancy
(noun) treating a serious situation with arrogant humor or disrespect
foment
(verb) to stir into action; rouse; incite
foresight
(noun) the ability to see ahead, anticipate, or predict
frugal
(adj) careful with money; thrifty
fulminate
(verb) to explode, either with sound or anger
furtive
(adj) sneaky; secretive
futile
(adj) hopelessly ineffective; useless; in vain
garbled
(adj) changed so much that the original meaning has been distorted; scrambled
garish
(adj) flashy; gaudy
garner
(verb) collect; gather; accumulate; earn
garrulous
(adj) very talkative; loquacious
genial
(adj) friendly; gracious; kind
germane
(adj) relevant; fitting
girth
(noun) distance around an object; circumference
glutton
(noun) a person who consumes huge quantities of food or drink; someone with great endurance
gregarious
(adj) sociable; extroverted; enjoying companionship
gravity
(noun) seriousness
gullible
(adj) easily deceived
hackneyed
(adj) unoriginal; trite
hamper
(verb) interfere with movement or progress
haphazard
(adj) without plan or direction
harangue
(noun) a long, lecturing speech
harbor
(verb) to provide shelter or refuge; hide
hardy
(adj) bold; brave; capable of withstanding harsh conditions
hedge
(verb) to avoid giving a clear answer, thereby escaping responsibility or blame
heed
(verb) notice; pay attention to
heinous
(adj) shockingly evil
heresy
(noun) an opinion expressed in defiance of generally accepted ideas
hiatus
(noun) gap; interruption; a break in continuity; a pause
hierarchy
(noun) a group of people in authority, ranked in order of power; a sequential listing
homage
(noun) respect paid to someone or something; tribute; honor
homogeneous
(adj) the same throughout; consistent; uniform
hyperbole
(noun) extreme exaggeration
hypocrite
(noun) an insincere person; one who pretends to have felings he doesn't really possess
idolatry
(noun) the worship of objects or people as gods
imbue
(verb) to fill, as with a strong dye or a strong feeling
imminent
(adj) about to take place; happening soon
immutable
(adj) unable to change
impair
(verb) weaken in strength or value
impasse
(noun) a situation from which you cannot escape; stalemate
impassive
(adj) without feeling; expressionless
impede
(verb) get in the way; hinder
impetuous
(adj) taking sudden action; hasty; impulsive
impostor
(noun) pretender
impudence
(noun) rudeness; insolence
inadvertent
(adj) unintentional
inane
(adj) silly; insignificant
inaugurate
(verb) begin; induct into
incessant
(adj) continuous; endless
inchoate
(adj) not yet fully developed
incite
(verb) arouse to action; stir up; foment
incompatible
(adj) incapable of existing together in peace
incongruous
(adj) out of place
incorrigible
(adj) impossible to correct, control, or discipline
incredulous
(adj) unwilling or unable to believe
indict
(verb) charge with a crime; accuse
indigent
(adj) very poor
indolent
(adj) lazy
induce
(verb) cause to happen; bring about
inert
(adj) lacking movement; inactive; sluggish
infallible
(adj) incapable of making a mistake
infamy
(noun) a bad reputation; notoriety
infer
(verb) to figure out, based on given information; conclude; deduce
infiltrate
(verb) penetrate by passing through gaps; enter secretly and become established, such as a spy might do in an enemy organization
ingenuous
(adj) naive; unsophisticated; inexperienced
innate
(adj) having a quality that arise from within, rather than learned or acquired from the oustide; native; inborn
innocuous
(adj) harmless; inoffensive
innovation
(noun) a new idea, product, or method
inscrutable
(adj) mysterious
insipid
(adj) dull; flat; without sparkle or flavor
insolent
(adj) rude; haughty