33 terms

Literary Terms 76-100

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Terms in this set (...)

Falling Action
where the climax begins to resolve itself (the detectives finally figured out the last piece of the case and then realized that the killer was the janitor. After they arrested him, all went back to normal.)
Fantasy
a story that concerns an unreal world or contains unreal characters (Cinderella)
Figurative Language
the use of tropes or figures of speech; going beyond the literal meaning to achieve literary effect (The wind was dancing through the trees.)
Figures of speech
a device used to produce figurative language; comparing 2 dissimilar things; includes apostrophe, hyperbole, irony, metaphor, oxymoron, paradox etc. (I've heard that song a million times.)
Flashback
the insertion of an earlier event into the normal chronological order of a narrative (I was walking down the street and I saw a cat on the side of the road, all of a sudden I remembered... I was sitting on the swings in my back yard and I heard screaming. Naturally I ran to see what was causing the commotion and realized that a cat was stuck in a tree and a young girl was crying for help. I climbed up the tree and rescued the cat.)
Foil
a person or thing that contrasts with and so emphasizes and enhances the qualities of another (Theresa was always rude and made fun of Jack. Jack responded simply by saying "I'm sorry that you feel that way," and would give a nice and genuine smile in her direction.)
Foot
a unit of measurement in a poem (The woods are lovely dark and deep but i have promises to keep)
Iamb
a specific poetic meter- unstressed syllable follow by a stressed syllable (All i could see from where I stood)
Trochee
a foot consisting of one long or stressed syllable followed by one short or unstressed syllable (Double, Double, toil and trouble)
Dactyl
one accented syllable followed by 2 unaccented syllables ("Picture yourself on a boat in a river with tangerine trees and marmalade skies"-The Beatles)
Anapest
two unaccented syllables followed by one accented syllable ("The Assyrian came down like a wolf on the fold and his cohorts were gleaming in purple and gold..."-Byron)
Spondee
two unaccented syllables (I breathe, shine, and seek to mend.")
Foreshadowing
the presentation of material in such a way that the reader is prepared for what is to come later (After the team won, a tough game, all of the players started acting like bad sports and chastising the other team. Their coach said to them, "You reap what you sow...")
Fragment
a word, phrase, or clause that does not form a full sentence (After the snow stopped)
Frame Device
a story within a story (the father started reading his young son a bead time story, "And the mama rabbit began reading his son a story, 'The baby dragon fly asked his mom to read him a story about the baby bumblebee, so she began to tell it...' ")
Free verse
lines of poetry that are written without rules (the door was locked
So my friends and I went through the back The only trouble was that was locked too. We had no way of getting inside,
Which meant that
We couldn't get the confidential letter that was hidden there.)
Haiku
5-7-5 syllables, nature is linked to human nature
( The calming sea breeze,
Waves crashing along the shore,
Peace, serenity.)
Homily
sermon- any serious talk, speech, or lecture, involving moral or spiritual advice (The priest came in and talked to the class about the importance of living a moral life.)
Hortatory
urging, or strongly, encouraging (I tried to convince my friend to play on the volleyball team. I told her everyday that she didn't have a choice and even introduced her to the coach, and put notes in her locker telling her to play)
Hubris
excessive pride or arrogance that results in the downfall of the protagonist (Oedipus in Oedipus the King, is on his way to Thebes and he meets the king and kills him and all the men in his carriage over who has the right of way. This eventually leads to his downfall because he marries his mother and realizes that he killed his father.)
Hyperbole
intentional exaggeration (That was the worst book in the entire world.)
Hypothetical Question
a question that raises a hypothesis, conjecture, or supposition (What is the meaning of life?)
Idiom
an expression that cannot be understood from the literal meaning of the words in the expression (Its raining cats and dogs)
Imagery
the use of figures of speech to create vivid images that appeal to the senses (The light breeze was blowing through the trees shaking the brightly colored leaves off as they slowly drifted through the air before they touched the cold ground.)
Implication
a suggestion an author or speaker makes without stating it directly (In the interview we read in class from Jhumpa Lahiri, she suggests that the title of the book, "Interpreter of Maladies" expresses the dilemma of communicating emotional pain.)
Inductive Reasoning
deriving a general principle from particular facts or instances (The cheetah could outrun any animal on Earth: it can be induced that the cheetah is the fastest animal on Earth)
Inference
a conclusion one draws based on premises or evidence (In the novel "Home" by Toni Morrison, the reader is never told the race of the characters but it can be assumed that they are African American because of the way that they are treated by other characters. Lilly, one of the characters, wanted to buy an apartment but she was turned away because the other residents didn't want someone of her race in the building.)
Invective
an emotionally violent, verbal denunciation or attack using strong abusive language (Judy, the popular girl in the school, told Lindsay, "You are the most nerdy girl in this school and no one likes you because you are a geek. Everyone hates you and talks about you and how terrible you dress and about what an annoying person you are. You are worthless.")
Inversion
a sentence in which the verb precedes the subject (Hardly had he taken a seat in the car before his mother drove off)
Irony
the contrast between what is stated explicitly (When you go to McDonalds and order a big mad and large fry but a diet coke)
Verbal Irony
when the words literally state the opposite of the meaning (the chair is as comfortable as sitting on a chair of nails)
Situational Irony
when events turn out opposite of what was expected (A woman has been saving up to buy a nice purse, her daughter comes home from college with the same purse for her as a gift)
Dramatic Irony
when facts or events are unknown to a character in a play or piece of function but known to the reader/audience (in Oedipus the King the audience knows that he married his mother and killed his father but he doesn't know that and neither do any of the other characters.)