32 terms

EPPP: Phys. Psych. & Psychopharm. Part 2

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Broca's aphasia
expressive aphasia
Broca's aphasia
motor aphasia
Broca's aphasia
nonfluent aphasia
location of Broca's area
dominant (left) frontal lobe
location of Wernicke's area
dominant (left) temporal lobe
Wernicke's aphasia
receptive aphasia
Wernicke's aphasia
sensory aphasia
Wernicke's aphasia
fluent aphasia
Traits of Broca's aphasia
difficult, slow speech, poor articulation
Traits of Broca's aphasia
omit conjunctions, prepositions, endings of nouns and verbs
Traits of Broca's aphasia
anomia, difficulty repeating phrases
Traits of Broca's aphasia
comprehension of language is only somewhat impaired
Traits of Broca's aphasia
typically aware of deficits
Traits of Wernicke's aphasia
trouble understanding written and spoken language
Traits of Wernicke's aphasia
trouble generating meaningful language
Traits of Wernicke's aphasia
rapid, effortless, syntactically correct speech
Traits of Wernicke's aphasia
speech is devoid of content
Traits of Wernicke's aphasia
anomia, paraphasia, problems with repetition
Traits of Wernicke's aphasia
unaware of their problem
anomia
inability to name common or familiar objects
paraphasia
substitution of words related in sound or meaning to intended words
Conduction Aphasia
Associative Aphasia
Conduction Aphasia
cause by damage to arcuate fasciculus
arcuate fasciculus
connects Broca and Wernicke areas
Conduction Aphasia
no significant impairment to language comprehension
Conduction Aphasia
results in anomia and impaired repetition
Transcortical Aphasia
caused by lesions outside of Broca and Wernicke areas that isolate them from rest of brain
Transcortical Motor Aphasia
damage only isolates Broca's area
Transcortical Motor Aphasia
nonfluent, effortful speech, lack of spontaneous speech, anomia, unimpaired comprehension or repetition
Transcortical Sensory Aphasia
damage only isolates Wernicke's area
Transcortical Sensory Aphasia
deficits in comprehension, anomia, fluent speech, unimpaired repetition
Transcortical Sensory Aphasia
can produce automatic responses (familiar songs), can repeat words, phrases, or sentences spoken by others