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43 terms

Respiration Physiology

These flashcards cover volume and capacity of respiration.
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The volume air exhaled in quiet respiration
Resting tidal volume (TV)
The difference between the volume of air inhaled and the maximum volume that could be inhaled
Inspiratory reserve volume (IRV)
The difference between the volume of air exhaled and the maximum volume that could be exhaled
Expiratory reserve volume (ERV)
Air remaining in the lungs after a maximum exhalation
Residual volume (RV)
Never subject to gas exchange; in upper respiratory tract and conducting passageway
Dead air
Maximum volume of air that can be exhaled following maximum inhalation - volume available for life and speech
Vital capacity
The volume of air remaining in the body after a passive expiration
Functional residual capacity
All volumes (except dead air)
Total lung capacity
Tidal volume (TV) + inspiratory reserve volume (IRV) - maximum inspiration possible after tidal expiration
Inspiratory capacity
This volume is the difference between the volume of air exhaled and the maximum volume that could be exhaled.
Expiratory reserve volume
This is the portion of the respiratory cycle in which air is forced out of the lungs.
Expiration
This is the term for movement of air into and out of the lungs.
Respiration (ventilation)
This is the volume of air actually inspired and expired during a regular respiratory cycle.
Tidal volume
This is the volume of air remaining in the lungs after a maximum exhalation.
Residual volume
This volume is the difference between the volume of air inhaled and the maximum volume that could be inhaled.
Inspiratory reserve volume
This is the portion of the respiratory cycle in which air is sucked into the lungs.
Inspiration
This is the term for breathing when at rest.
Quiet respiration
This is the volume of air exhaled in quiet respiration.
Resting tidal volume
These are the three passive forces of expiration.
torque, elasticity, gravity
This instrument is used to measure respiratory pressures.
(U-tube) Manometer
This is the term for breathing with exertion, requiring muscular effort on expiration as well as on inspiration.
Forced respiration
This is the term for an amount of air inhaled, exhaled, or in the lungs
Volume
This instrument is used to measure respiratory volumes.
(Wet) spirometer
This is the volume of air remaining in the body after a passive expiration.
Functional residual capacity
This is the sum of all the volumes.
Total lung capacity
twisting, especially of chondral portion of ribs in inspiration; untorques for quiet expiration
Torque
recoil forces of lungs and rib cage to return structures to resting state
Elasticity
natural force to pull raised structures down to resting position
Gravity
Number of inspirations and expirations in a respiratory cycle
1 each
Average minute volume (the amount of air you breathe quietly in one minute)
6000 ml/6 liters
Total lung capacity
5100 ml
Vital capacity
4000 ml
Average breaths per minute (bpm) during quiet tidal breathing for adults
12-18 bpm
Average number of alveoli at birth
25 million
Average number of alveoli by 8 years
300 million
Average bpm taken by an infant
40-70 bpm
Age when process of alveolar development is nearly complete
8 years
Volume of air in inspiratory reserve volume (IRV) for an average adult
2500 ml
Volume of air in expiratory reserve volume (ERV) for an average adult
1000 cc or ml/1.0 liters
Volume of air in residual volume (RV) for an average adult
1100 cc or ml/1.1 liters
Average volume of air exchanged in one cycle of tidal breathing for an average adult
525 cc or ml
Dead air volume
150 cc or ml
Volume of air remaining in the lungs after each breath of tidal respiration
38% of vital capacity