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235 terms

Intro to SW Exam 1b

STUDY
PLAY
Advocacy
A term that means actively intervening in order to help clients get what they need
Agency policies
Standards adopted by individual organizations and programs that provide services
Assessment
The identification of the nature and extent of client needs and concerns, as well as critical information about client resources and supports and other environment factors so that a helping plan can be devised and implemented
Biology
The study of living organisms and their physical functions
Client system
Any individual, family, group, organization, or community who will ultimately benefit from social work intervention
Conservatism
The philosophy that individuals are responsible for themselves, government should provide minimal interference in people's lives, and change is generally unnecessary
Coping
The struggle to adjust to surrounding environmental conditions and overcome problems
Counseling
A field overlapping with various other fields including social work that focuses on problem-solving and providing help to individuals, families, or groups
Criminal justice
The configuration of programs, policies, and agencies dealing with crime, incarceration, legal processes, and the rehabilitation of criminal offenders
Critical thinking
The careful scrutiny of what is stated as true or what appears to be true and the resulting expression of an opinion or conclusion based on that scrutiny, and the creative formulation of an opinion or conclusion when presented with a question, problem, or issue
Cultural anthropology
The branch of anthropology that deals with human culture, especially its history, social structures, language, and technology
Developmental perspective
An approach that seeks to identify social interventions that have a positive impact on economic development
Eco-systems theory
A system- and environment-oriented approach to problem solving
Economic justice
A term that concerns the distribution of resources in a fair and equitable manner
Economics
The study of the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services
Empowerment
The process of increasing personal, interpersonal, or political power so that individuals can take action to improve their life situations
Evidence-based practice
The conscientious, explicit, and judicious use of current best evidence in making decisions about the care of clients
Forensic social work
Social work dealing with the law, educating lawyers, and serving as expert witnesses
Generalist practice
The application of an eclectic knowledge base, professional values, and a wide range of skills to target any size system for change within the context of four primary processes
Human rights
The premise that all people, regardless of race, culture, or national origin, are entitled to basic rights and treatment
Institutional perspective
An approach that views people's needs as a normal part of life. People's right to receive benefits and services on an ongoing basis
Liberalism
The philosophy that supports government involvement in the social, political, and economic structure so that all people's rights and privileges are protected in the name of social justice
Macro system
A large system that includes organizations and communities
Mezzo system
A group
Micro system
An individual
Occupational social work
Social work focusing on work in employee assistance programs or directed toward organizational change
Police social work
Social work emphasizing work within police, courthouse, and jail settings to provide services to crime victims
Political ideology
The relatively coherent system of ideas (beliefs, traditions, principles, and myths) about human nature, institutional arrangements, and social processes that indicate how a government should be run and what principles that government should support
Political science
The study of political and governmental structures and functioning
Populations-at-risk
Certain populations or groups of people based on some identified characteristics who are at greater risk of social and economic deprivation than the general mainstream of society
Psychiatry
The branch of medicine that specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of mental disorders
Psychology
A field that emphasizes the study of behavior and cognitive processing
Psychotherapy
A skilled treatment process whereby a therapist works with an individual, couple, family, or group to address a mental disorder or alleviate other problems the client(s) may be having in the social environment
Radicalism
The philosophy that the social and political system as it stands is not structurally capable of truly pursuing social justice
Research-informed practice
The use of approaches and interventions in their practice that research has determined are effective
Residual perspective
An approach that conceives of social welfare as focusing on problems and gaps. The focus is on people's failure and faults
Rural social work
Social work addressing the unique problems of people living in rural areas
Social environment
The conditions, circumstances, and human interactions that encompass human beings
Social justice
A term that involves the idea that in a perfect world, all citizens would have identical rights, protection, opportunities, obligations, and social benefits
Social welfare
A nation's system of programs, benefits, and services that help people meet those social, economic, educational, and health needs that are fundamental to the maintenance of society
Social welfare policy
The laws and regulations that govern which social welfare programs exist, what categories of clients are served, and who qualifies for a given program
Social work
The professional activity of helping individuals, groups, or communities enhance or restore their capacity for social functioning and creating societal conditions favorable to this goal (NASW)
Social work practice
The doing of social work
Sociology
The study of human society, how various groups interact with each other, and how social institutions structure the social environment in which we live
System
A set of elements that is orderly and interrelated to make a function whole
Systems theories
Theories that focus on the dynamics among and interactions of people in their environment
Target system
The system that social workers need to change or influence in order to accomplish their goals
Triple A approach
An approach to critical thinking that states you should: (1) Ask questions; (2) Assess the established facts and issues involved; (3) Assert a concluding opinion
NASW defines ________ as the professional activity of helping individuals, groups, or communities enhance or restore their capacity for social functioning and creating societal conditions favorable to this goal.
social work
Critical thinking:
concentrates on the process of reasoning.
At the paraprofessional level, social service ________ typically hold an associate's degree or a baccalaureate degree in a non-social work discipline and serve under the social worker's supervision in designated tasks such as conducting basic interviews, making referrals, and completing paperwork.
technicians
________ is the branch of medicine that specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of mental disorders.
Psychiatry
________ is described in the text as the process of increasing personal, interpersonal, or political power so that individuals can take action to improve their life situations.
Empowerment
Residually-oriented programs include:
Temporary Assistance to Needy Families.
________ is the philosophy that individuals are responsible for themselves, government should provide minimal interference in people's lives and change is generally unnecessary.
Conservatism
________ is the philosophy that the social and political system as it stands is not structurally capable of truly pursuing social justice.
Radicalism
________ involves the idea that all citizens would have identical rights, protections, opportunities, obligations, and social benefits.
Social justice
The Triple A approach to critical thinking involves:
ask, assess, assert.
Barker describes ________ as a nation's system of programs, benefits, and services that help people meet those social, economic, educational, and health needs that are fundamental to the maintenance of society.
social welfare
Organizations and communities are considered ________ systems.
macro
The medical model:
focuses on the individual as having something wrong with him or her.
The ________ system is the system that social workers need to change or influence in order to accomplish their goals.
target
Advocate
One who steps forward and speaks out on the behalf of clients in order to promote fair and equitable treatment or gain needed resources
Ageism
Discrimination based on preconceived notions about older people, regardless of their individual qualities and capabilities
Assessment
The investigation and determination of variables affecting an identified problem or issue as viewed from micro, mezzo, or macro perspectives
Broker
One who links client systems to needed resources
Case Manager
A practitioner who, on the behalf of a specific client, coordinates needed services provided by any number of agencies, organizations, or facilities (also referred to as case coordinator)
Counselor
One who provides guidance to clients and assists them in a planned- change or problem-solving process
Critical thinking
The careful scrutiny of what is stated as true or what appears to be true and the resulting expression of an opinion or conclusion based on that scrutiny, and the creative formulation of an opinion or conclusion when presented with a question, problem, or issue
Educator
One who gives information and teaches skills to other systems
Empathy
This skill involves not only being in tune with how clients feel but also conveying to them that workers understand how they feel (sharing of self by relating in a natural, sincere, spontaneous, open and genuine manner
Engagement
The initial period when practitioners orient themselves to the problem and begin to establish communication and a relationship with others also addressing the problem
Evaluation
A process of determining whether a given change effort was worthwhile
Facilitator
One who guides a group experience
Generalist practice
The application of an eclectic knowledge base, professional values, and a wide range of skills to target any size system for change within the context of four primary processes
Genuineness
A skill that involves workers continuing to be themselves while working to accomplish goals in their professional role
Implementation
The process whereby client and worker follow their plan to achieve their goals
Intervention
The use of thoughtful and planned efforts to bring about a specific change
Macro practice
Intervention involving organizations and communities
Managers
People in these positions generally assume greater responsibility for more aspects of agency functioning than supervisors
Mediator
One who resolves arguments or disagreements among micro, mezzo, or macro systems in conflict
Mezzo practice
Work with small groups
Micro practice
Intervention involving an individual client
Mobilizer
One who identifies and convenes community people and resources to identify unmet community needs and effect changes for the better in their community
Nonverbal communication
The body language and sounds that convey information about how a person feels without saying so in words
Organizational structure
This involves how lines of authority and communication operate within an agency, how the administration runs the organization, and what the agency environment is like
Planned change
A process that involves the development and implementation of a strategy for improving or altering some specified condition, pattern of behavior, or set of circumstances that affects social functioning
Planning
This stage specifies what should be done
Problem solving
The same process as planned change, although social work's emphasis on strengths may be at odds with the more negative connotations of this description
Program evaluation
The systematic examination of the success, effectiveness, and efficiency of an ongoing program
Supervisor
A person given authority within an organization to direct, coordinate, enhance, and evaluate the on-the-job performance of designated employees
Termination
The end of the professional social worker-client relationship
Warmth
A skill that involves enhancing workers' positive feelings toward another person by promoting a sense of comfort and well-being in that person
________ is the process of planning and implementing steps to make positive changes and attain goals that solve clients' problems or improve clients' quality of life.
Intervention
In the planned-change approach, which one of the following steps occurs next after engagement?
Assessment
The ________ links client systems to needed resources.
broker
A(n) ________ is a practitioner who, on the behalf of a specific client, coordinates needed services provided by any number of agencies, organizations, or facilities.
case manager
Sylvester is having difficulty interacting with family members, peers, and adults. He might benefit from membership in a treatment group with other children experiencing similar difficulties. This would be considered intervention at the ________ level.
mezzo
The text describes ________communication as body language and sounds that convey information about how a person feels without saying so in words.
nonverbal
________ refers to discrimination based on preconceived notions about older people, regardless of their individual qualities and capabilities.
Ageism
The ________ stage of the planned-change system is the process of determining whether a given change effort was worthwhile.
evaluation
The ________ identifies and convenes community people and resources to identify unmet community needs and effect changes for the better in their community.
mobilizer
The Triple A approach to critical thinking is:
Ask, Assess, Assert
Abraham is a social worker at Sasquatch County Social Services. He has noticed that some of his clients are having trouble getting to their physical therapy because they don't have van access. Abraham petitions before the County Board for Sasquatch County to purchase a van for the county residents with physical disabilities. This would be considered ________ level intervention.
macro
Administrative group
A group of social service agency administrators who meet regularly to discuss issues and develop plans for running the organization
Broker role
Social workers in this role link clients to needed resources and services
Case management role
Social workers in this role coordinate services provided by a number of agencies or services on a client's behalf. A case coordinator synchronizes and oversees services to make sure the client gets what he or she needs
Committee
A group of persons delegated to consider, investigate, take action on, or report on some matter
Community
A number of people who have something in common with one another that connects them in some way and that distinguishes them from others
Community organization
The term used in the past to refer to macro practice in social work
Counselor role
Social workers in this role follow the planned-change process and help clients develop solutions to problems
Delegate council
A group of representatives from various agencies or from units within a single agency that meet to discuss issues of mutual concern
Educational group
This group provides some type of information to participants
Educator role
Social workers in this role teach and inform of more efficient techniques for solving problems
Growth group
This group aims at expanding self-awareness, increasing potential, and maximizing health and well-being
Locality development
This term emphasizes community change pursued optimally through broad participation of a wide spectrum of people at the local community level
Macro practice
Intervention involving organizations and communities
Micro practice
Intervention involving an individual client
Nonprofit social agencies
Agencies that seek to accomplish some service provision goal, not to make a profit for private owners. Sources of funding can include tax monies, private donations, grants, and service fees
Private social agencies
Agencies that are privately owned and run by people not employed by government
Proprietary social agencies
Agencies that provide some designated social services, often similar to those provided by nonprofit social agencies. However, a primary purpose for the existence of a proprietary social agency is to earn a profit for its owners (also called for-profit)
Public social agencies
Agencies that are run by some designated unit of government and are usually regulated by laws impacting policy
Purchase-of-service contract
An agreement signed such as when public agencies buy services from private agencies
Social action
Coordinated effort to advocate for change in a social institution to benefit a specific population, solve a social problem, correct unfairness, or enhance people's well-being
Social action group
A group formed to engage in some planned-change effort to modify or improve aspects of their macro social or physical environment
Social agency
An organization providing social services that is usually staffed by human services personnel (including social workers, members of other professions, paraprofessionals and undertake specified tasks under professionals' supervision), clerical personnel, and sometimes volunteers (also called social services agency)
Social planning
A technical process of problem-solving with regard to substantive social problems, such as delinquency, housing, and mental health
Social services
Services that include the wide range of activities that social workers perform to help people solve problems and improve their personal well-being
Socialization group
A group that helps participants improve interpersonal behavior, communication, and social skills so that they might better fit into their social environment
Support group
A group in which members share common issues or problems and meet on an ongoing basis to cope with stress, give each other suggestions, provide encouragement, convey information, and furnish emotional support
Task (or Work group)
A group that applies the principles of group dynamics to solve problems, develop ideas, formulate plans, and achieve goals
Team group
A group of two or more people gathered together to work collaboratively and interdependently to achieve a designated purpose
Therapy group
A group that helps members with serious psychological and emotional problems change their behavior
Treatment conference
A group that meets to establish, monitor, and coordinate service plans on behalf of a client system
Treatment group
A group that helps individuals solve personal problems, change unwanted behaviors, cope with stress, and improve quality of life
A ________ social agency provides a designated social service; however, a primary purpose for the existence of the agency is to earn a profit for its owners.
proprietary
Social workers performing ________ functions coordinate services provided by a number of agencies or services on a client's behalf.
case manager
________ groups help individuals solve personal problems, change unwanted behaviors, cope with stress, and improve quality of life.
Treatment
________ groups help members with serious psychological and emotional problems change their behavior.
Therapy
________ groups help participants improve interpersonal behavior, communication, and social skills so that they might better fit into their social environment.
Socialization
A group of professionals working in rape crisis centers throughout a state, with each agency designating a representative to meet in the council to discuss education and treatment issues is an example of a:
delegate council.
A board of directors authorized to formulate an organization's mission, objectives, and policies, and to oversee its ongoing activities is an example of a(n):
administrative group.
________, a method of community organization used in the past, involves experts or consultants working, usually with designated community leaders, to solve specific problems.
Social planning
The Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts that between 2006 and 2016 the number of social workers will increase by approximately ________ percent.
22
A public agency needs specialized services that it does not normally provide. It will be more cost-effective for the agency to buy the service from a private agency. The private agency then assumes responsibility for developing and overseeing service provision. This type of transaction is called:
purchase-of-service contract.
A coordinated effort to advocate for change in a social institution to benefit a specific population, solve a social problem, correct unfairness, or enhance people's well-being was a method of community organization called:
social action.
Advocacy
The act of standing up for and defending the cause of another
Aid to Dependent Children
This was the original name of the program later changed to Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC). As part of the Social Security Act of 1935, it provided public relief to needy children through cash grants to their families. This program was replaced in 1996 with the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF)
Assimilation
The process of incorporating another culture into the mainstream culture
Charity Organization Societies
The emphasis was not on lay communal expertise but on scientific practice and expert knowledge and that the underlying assumption was that individual need was a result of moral turpitude and that moral teaching combined with minimal assistance, would support people in taking care of themselves
Chinese Exclusion Act
This act of 1882 denied Chinese immigrants from further access to the country because of blatant racism towards Chinese immigrants
Civil Rights Act of 1964
The most important piece of civil rights legislation since the Civil War. It included desegregating public education; the Civil Rights Commission was given expanded investigative power, and the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission was established to oversee civil rights in employment
Civilian Conservation Corps
This was part of the New Deal, and recruited males between 18 and 25 who were receiving public assistance, and transported them to revitalize parks in the West and participate in reforestation, flood prevention, and fire control projects. The intent was to provide employment
Civilian Works Administration
This was part of the New Deal, and channeled funds to finance various public works such as building roads, cataloging resources in libraries, etc. with the intent of creating jobs
Community Mental Health Centers Act
This act was passed in 1963 to provide federal funding for community mental health centers, training programs, and outpatient treatment programs
Compassionate conservatism
The philosophy that although government should not interfere directly with people's lives, it should help people to help themselves
Crime Bill of 1994
This bill increased funding for hiring more police officers and building more prisons, in addition to enacting federal penalties and developing social services to decrease domestic violence
Culture of poverty
A term referring to the pattern of values, norms, and expectations conveyed from one generation to another that limits people to a life of poverty and discourages them from taking advantage of economic and social opportunities
Deinstitutionalization
This movement in mental health emphasized the provision of care in people's own communities as opposed to institutions
Economic Opportunity Act
This act was passed in 1964, and included programs such as Volunteers in Service to America (VISTA), Job Corps, Upward Bound, Neighborhood Youth Corps, Operation Head Start, and Community Action Programs
Elizabethan Poor Law
This English law in 1601 is considered the first piece of legislation establishing coherent, consistent public support for needy people through local taxes
English Poor Law Reforms
These reforms, in 1834, significantly reduced all outdoor relief and brought back workhouses as the only place where able-bodied people could receive benefits
Family and Medical Leave Act
An act established in 1993 that requires that both public and private employers with 50 or more employees provide up to 12 weeks of unpaid annual leave after a birth or child adoption, while caring for an ill family member, or during recuperation from illness
Federal Emergency Relief Act
This act was part of the New Deal, and provided federal grants to the states that would be administered by government units at the state and local levels to people in need
Feudalism
Wealthy landed gentry oversaw the labor of landless serfs who made a living by working their overseer's lands. In return, serfs received general protection and care during sickness and old age
Freedmen's Bureau
The formal name was the Bureau of Refugees, Freemen, and Abandoned Land, it was established in 1865 and disbanded in 1872. It was the first federal welfare agency, and established a precedent for federal participation in social welfare during emergency periods
Housing and Urban Development Act
The act passed in 1968 and provided new low-income housing opportunities for eligible families
Immigration Act of 1924
This act halted Asian immigration altogether that lasted until 1968
Indian General Allotment Act
The act was passed in 1887, and was the most devastating piece of Indian legislation in the United States. Its intent was to assimilate American Indians by giving them land and potential citizenship in return for their turning their backs on their culture and becoming productive citizens
Indian Removal Act
This act, passed in 1830, resulte4d in thousands of American Indians being removed from their own lands and relocated to distant reservations
Indian Reorganization Act
This act in 1934 prohibited the further allotment of tribal lands to individuals, established a credit fund to provide tribes with loans, and gave American Indians preference for being hired in the Bureau of Indian Affairs
Industrialization
This occurs with mammoth growth in manufacturing and technology
Jones Act
This act allowed Puerto Ricans U.S. citizenship
Law of Settlement
This law was passed in 1662, establishing a notable new principle of social welfare service provision, the residency requirement
Medicare Modernization Act
Established in 2003, and taking full effect in 2006, this act includes the Medicare prescription drug benefit
Mental hygiene movement
This movement emphasized specialized psychiatric units and psychotherapy
Moral treatment movement
This movement emphasized humane treatment in structured institutional settings
New Deal
Franklin D. Roosevelt initiated this plan in 1933, which was a vigorous plan that created a wide range of social programs and significantly extended federal control in social welfare matters
Older Americans Act
This act passed in 1965 and establishes an administrative structure for the coordination and delivery of social services to older people
Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunities Act
This act passed in 1996 and affected public assistance, SSI, immigrants' ability to receive benefits, child care, and nutritional and food programs. One of its facets, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families replaced AFDC
Public Assistance
A category of the Social Security Act that established public assistance for the elderly (Old Age Assistance); dependent children in single-parent families, and children with disabilities, (Aid to Dependent Children); and people who are blind (Aid to the Blind)
Public Welfare Amendments
In 1962, these amendments provided job training, job placement, and counseling to help welfare recipients get back on their feet and eventually become self-supporting
Public Works Administration
A program of the New Deal with the intent to stimulate depressed industries by contracting with private businesses to build public facilities, thereby increasing the number of available jobs
Serviceman's Readjustment Act
This act is commonly referred to as the G.I. Bill. Its p8urpose was to provide veterans with opportunities for education and training, home and business loans, and employment services to help them return to civilian life
Settlement Houses
Places where ministers, students, or humanitarians moved to interact with poor slum dwellers, with the purpose of alleviating the conditions of capitalism
Social Insurance
This was a category of the Social Security Act that established old-age insurance (pensions) for the elderly; unemployment insurance; and worker's compensation
Social Security Act
This act was passed in 1935 and was the most notable piece of legislation shaping social welfare policy during this period. It consisted of 11 titles and totally reconfigured the social welfare system. It placed the burden on the federal government to provide a coordinated system of resources
Speenhamland System
A system developed in England in 1795 of supplementing the income of all poor people so that everyone would have what was deemed the minimum income necessary for survival. It was a failure because there were no work incentives
Supplementary Security Income
This program replaced Old-Age Assistance, Aid to the Blind, and Aid to the Permanently and Totally Disabled programs in 1972
Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF)
A program established in 1996 that replaced AFDC and changed welfare as we know it
Trail of Tears
The 1200-mile trip that the Cherokee nation walked from their homeland to Indian Territory in 1838
Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo
A treaty signed in 1848 where Mexico ceded more than half of its territory to the U.S. including contemporary Arizona, New Mexico, and Upper California, along with portions of Colorado, Nevada, and Utah, in addition to the U.S. retention of part of Texas
Urbanization
This occurs when masses of people move from rural to urban areas
Works Progress Administration
A program that was part of the New Deal, and was designed to provide work for unemployed people with various skills. One thrust was to support the work of artists, musicians, writers, and scholars
The text defines ________ as the principal type of political organization in Europe where the wealthy landed gentry oversaw the labor of landless serfs who made a living by working their overseer's lands. In return, serfs received general protection and care during sickness and old age.
feudalism
________ was an early advocate for people with mental illness during the 1840s, and was a volunteer Sunday school teacher in a Massachusetts women's prison.
Dorothea Dix
The ________, passed in 1830, resulted in thousands of American Indians being taken from their own lands and relocated to distant "reservations."
Indian Removal Act
________ was a primary proponent of the charity organization movement and a significant force in the early definition of social work.
Mary Richmond
Jane Addams and ________ rented a house in Chicago from Charles J. Hull to begin a settlement house.
Ellen Gates Starr
The current public assistance program is called:
Temporary Assistance for Needy Families.
George W. Bush believed that although government should not interfere directly with people's lives, it should help people to help themselves. He termed this philosophy:
compassionate conservatism.
The Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Land was more commonly known as the:
Freedmen's Bureau.
________ appealed to the president of the New York Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, who helped get "a special warrant" from a New York Supreme Court judge to remove Mary Ellen Wilson from her abusive home.
Etta Wheeler
Acculturation
The adaptation of language, identity, behavior patterns, and preferences to those of the host/majority society
Advance directives
Written, witnessed, and signed instructions regarding health care wishes of individuals in the event that they are unable to make these decisions
AIDS
Acquired immune deficiency syndrome, is caused by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), is a disease that destroys the body's immune system
Capitation
A term used to indicate a specified amount paid periodically to the provider for a group of specified services, regardless of quantity rendered
CD4 T cells
Cells, also called helper T-cells, that fight off diseases invading the body
Continuity of care
Efficient ongoing provision of services by different or the same agencies to meet clients' needs as their circumstances and needs change
Crisis intervention
A brief and time-limited therapeutic intervention through which a social worker helps a client learn to cope with or adjust to extreme external pressures
ELIZA
Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay is a test that detects the antibodies a person's immune system develops to fight the AIDS virus
Fatalism
The conception that events are fixed in advance so that human beings are powerless to change them
Filial piety
A devotion to and compliance with parental and familial authority, to the point of sacrificing individual desires and ambitions
HAART
Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy is a drug treatment approach combining three or more drugs that decreases HIV's resistance to treatment
HIV
Human immunodeficiency virus is a type of virus called a retrovirus
HMOs
Organizations that provide a wide range of health-care services for participants and employers, who typically pay an established monthly fee for services
Informed consent
A concept that involves a person's right to receive adequate information about the consequences and risks of a medical procedure or treatment process, evaluate alternatives, and give permission for a procedure before it's begun
Managed care
A generic label for a broad and constantly changing mix of health insurance, assistance, and payment programs that seek to retain quality and access while controlling the cost of physical and mental health services
National health insurance
A publicly funded program that would expand the current system of health-care provision to provide some level of coverage to everyone regardless of their ability to pay
Opportunistic diseases
Conditions and infections that themselves are usually not life threatening but that take advantage of a weakened immune system and use this opportunity to invade it
Pneumoncystis carinii pneumonia
A lung disease caused by a fungus to which people with normal immune systems are not vulnerable
Retrovirus
A special kind of virus that invades normal cells and causes them to reproduce more of the virus rather than reproduce themselves like other normal cells
Virus
A submicroscopic, infectious parcel of genetic material, in some ways resembling a tiny living organism and in other ways inert material, that can grow and multiply only within the living cells of bacteria, plants, and animals
Western blot
A test that detects the antibodies a person's immune system develops to fight the AIDS virus
In the text, ________ is defined as a wide range of health plans and practices that depart from the traditional model of private health insurance provided by one's employer.
managed care
In 2006, the United States spent ________% of its gross domestic product per person annually on health care.
16
________ is a devotion to and compliance with parental and familial authority, to the point of sacrificing individual desires and ambitions.
Filial piety
________ is a special kind of virus that invades normal cells and causes them to reproduce more of the virus rather than reproduce themselves like other normal cells.
Retrovirus
The multiple-drug treatment approach to decreasing HIV's resistance to treatment described in the text is called:
HAART
It is anticipated that the life expectancy between 2005 and 2010 for people living in Zimbabwe will decline from 61 to ________ years.
33
During the 1990s, simply breathing the air in Mexico City during one day was the equivalent of smoking ________ pack(s) of cigarettes.
two
The life expectancy for white males is ________ years greater than for African American males.
six
________ is described in the text as the efficient ongoing provision of services by different or the same agencies to meet clients' needs as their circumstances and needs change.
Continuity of care
Written, witnessed, signed instructions regarding what individuals wish to have done in the event that they are unable to make decisions are called:
advance directives.
________ percent of the world's children who have HIV/AIDS live in Sub-Saharan Africa.
88