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5 Written questions

5 Matching questions

  1. Aposiopesis-
  2. Deduction-
  3. Figurative Language -
  4. Ambiguity-
  5. Diction-
  1. a the multiple meanings, either intentional or unintentional, of a word, phrase, sentence, or passage

    Example: The title of the country song "Heaven's Just a Sin Away". At a religious level, it means that committing a sin keeps us out of heaven, but at a physical level, it means that committing a sin (sex) will bring heaven (pleasure).
  2. b a form of ellipse by which a speaker comes to an abrupt halt, seemingly overcome by passion (fear, excitement, etc.) or modesty.

    Example: "why, you..." "Why, I'll..." Get out, or else--"
  3. c is the choice of words used in speaking or writing. It is frequently divided into four levels: formal, informal, colloquial, and slang.

    Examples: I Love You
    formal -
    informal -
    colloquial -
    slang -
  4. d the body of devices that uses figures of speech to enable the writer to operate on levels other than the literal one. It includes metaphor, simile, symbol, motif, and hyperbole, etc.
  5. e the process of moving from a general rule to a specific example.

    Example: All men are mortal. Socrates is a man. Therefore, Socrates is mortal.

5 Multiple choice questions

  1. a more acceptable and usually more pleasant way of saying something that might be inappropriate or uncomfortable.

    Example: "He went to his final reward" is a common way of saying "he died." These also often used to obscure the reality of a situation. The military uses "collateral damage" to indicate civilian deaths in a military operation.
  2. the category to which a piece of writing can be classified.

    Example: The Natural is a novel; "The Sick Rose" is a poem
  3. the repetition of a word or phrase at the beginning of successive phrases, clauses, or lines.

    Example: "It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness..." - A Tale of Two Cities
  4. the repetition of initial consonant sounds, such as "Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers."
  5. arrangement of words, phrases, or clauses in an order of ascending power.

    Example- To strive, to seek, to find.

5 True/False questions

  1. Epigraph-arrangement of words, phrases, or clauses in an order of ascending power.

    Example- To strive, to seek, to find.

          

  2. Denotation-the interpretive level of a word based on its associated images rather than its literal meaning.

    Example: The wall in Frost's "Mending Wall" refers to the emotional barrier which prevents interaction between neighbors.

          

  3. Comic Relief-words describe things that exist and can be experienced through the senses. Abstractions are rendered understandable and specific through these kinds of examples.

    Example: "The apparition of these faces in the croed; Petals on a wet, black bough."
    Ezra Pound

          

  4. Conceit-words describe things that exist and can be experienced through the senses. Abstractions are rendered understandable and specific through these kinds of examples.

    Example: "The apparition of these faces in the croed; Petals on a wet, black bough."
    Ezra Pound

          

  5. Hubris -insolence, arrogance, or pride. In Greek tragedy, is usually the tragic flaw that leads to his or her downfall.

    Example: Roy Hobbs' overeating, Hamlet's indecision