Terms in this set (293)

14.[1]
When I was a boy growing up in Delhi, India, we had a kitchen garden behind our downstairs
apartment. My father was an avid gardener, he still is: and every Saturday morning he would put on his work clothes, pick up his hoe and trowel, and would head out the back door. 3
[2]
As a ten-year-old, I was supremely unenthusiastic about swinging a hoe in the garden when I could be out playing with my friends. Having tried and failed,
my father was unable to make a gardener of me.
I had no qualms, of course, about enjoying the
results of his labor: the potatoes, squash, cucumbers, and cauliflower that he pursued out of the earth. I would
even help him dig out the potatoes or cut a cucumber from its vine. To me, it was much more fun to reap than sowing.
[3]
Many years later, living in an upstairs apartment,
I am more often sorry I didn't follow my father out to the garden. I have several indoor plants, but the experience is not the same. The few times that I've helped a friend with yard work has given me the joy of touching the soil with an open palm, to get the earth under my fingernails, of patting down the berm around a newly transplanted sapling. Now that I live far from my father (I live in Iowa on the other side of the world), I wish I'd spend more time with him in the garden.
[4]
My favorite photograph of my father shows him
squatting on his heels, trowel in hand, behind a golden heap of onions freshly pulled from the ground. His glowing smile are evidence of his pride in the onions—the proof of his labor and love—and in me, the photographer, his son. In that photo, his love of the land and his love for me are somehow intertwined, indivisible. It is that same love—love of kin, love of land—that
pushes under my fingernails, pushes against my skin,when I thrust my hand into the yielding earth and think that on its far side my father might be doing the same.

14.
For the sake of the logic and coherence of the essay, Paragraph 2 should be placed:
Individual Question

A. where it is now.

B. before Paragraph 1.

C. after Paragraph 3.

D. after Paragraph 4.
15. [1]
When I was a boy growing up in Delhi, India, we had a kitchen garden behind our downstairs
apartment. My father was an avid gardener, he still is: and every Saturday morning he would put on his work clothes, pick up his hoe and trowel, and would head out the back door. 3
[2]
As a ten-year-old, I was supremely unenthusiastic about swinging a hoe in the garden when I could be out playing with my friends. Having tried and failed,
my father was unable to make a gardener of me.
I had no qualms, of course, about enjoying the
results of his labor: the potatoes, squash, cucumbers, and cauliflower that he pursued out of the earth. I would
even help him dig out the potatoes or cut a cucumber from its vine. To me, it was much more fun to reap than sowing.
[3]
Many years later, living in an upstairs apartment,
I am more often sorry I didn't follow my father out to the garden. I have several indoor plants, but the experience is not the same. The few times that I've helped a friend with yard work has given me the joy of touching the soil with an open palm, to get the earth under my fingernails, of patting down the berm around a newly transplanted sapling. Now that I live far from my father (I live in Iowa on the other side of the world), I wish I'd spend more time with him in the garden.
[4]
My favorite photograph of my father shows him
squatting on his heels, trowel in hand, behind a golden heap of onions freshly pulled from the ground. His glowing smile are evidence of his pride in the onions—the proof of his labor and love—and in me, the photographer, his son. In that photo, his love of the land and his love for me are somehow intertwined, indivisible. It is that same love—love of kin, love of land—that
pushes under my fingernails, pushes against my skin,when I thrust my hand into the yielding earth and think that on its far side my father might be doing the same.

Suppose the writer had intended to write a brief essay showing how a value he holds as an adult is very different from what he felt as a child. Would this essay successfully fulfill the writer's goal?


A. Yes, because the essay shows how the writer came to value gardening when this was something he had not appreciated as a child.

B. Yes, because the essay shows that as an adult the writer finally learned to value his father's ability to be a good parent, when as a child he had not done so.

C. No, because the focus of the essay is on the writer's father's values and not on the values of the writer himself.

D. No, because the essay is not about values; rather, it is about one man's avid interest in backyard gardening.
10. Whether its bright and jaunty or haunting and
melancholic, the music of the Andes highlands has a
mellow sound unique in the musical world. The
instrument responsible for this sound is the antara, or
Andean panpipe, known for the hollow-sounding,
breathy notes it creates. The antara has its origins in
the Incan civilization, once the more richer and more
powerful empire in South America.
The antara consists of a connected row of hollow,
vertical pipes of varying lengths, which are then lined up.
The pipes, which can vary numerously from three to
fifteen, are fashioned from clay that is rolled around
a mold. Each pipe is individually rolled to create the
proper pitch before being bound to the other pipes.
The antara dates back to the ninth century.
Evidence about how musicians played the instrument
have come from painted images on Incan ceramic
pottery. Musicians are depicted playing a six-pipe antara
by holding the lower ends of the two longer pipes
with the right hand while placing the left hand near the
remaining tops of the four pipes. The antara was also
sometimes held in one hand while the other hand beat
a cylindrical drum.

Due to the limited number of notes that can be played on an antara, early musicians' most likely worked in groups, coordinating the timing and pitch of their instruments to extend the range of sounds produced.

If the writer were to delete the phrase "coordinating the timing and pitch of their instruments" from the preceding sentence, the sentence would primarily lose:

E. a description of how musicians overcame the limitations of the antara.
F. an indication that music was an important element in Incan life.
G. the idea that the antara was a key feature of Incan music.
H. nothing of significance, because the phrase is redundant.
15. Whether its bright and jaunty or haunting and melancholic, the music of the Andes highlands has a mellow sound unique in the musical world. The
instrument responsible for this sound is the antara, or Andean panpipe, known for the hollow-sounding, breathy notes it creates. The antara has its origins in the Incan civilization, once the more richer and more powerful empire in South America.
The antara consists of a connected row of hollow, vertical pipes of varying lengths, which are then lined up. The pipes, which can vary numerously from three to fifteen, are fashioned from clay that is rolled around a mold. Each pipe is individually rolled to create the proper pitch before being bound to the other pipes.
The antara dates back to the ninth century.
Evidence about how musicians played the instrument have come from painted images on Incan ceramic pottery. Musicians are depicted playing a six-pipe antara
by holding the lower ends of the two longer pipes with the right hand while placing the left hand near the remaining tops of the four pipes. The antara was also sometimes held in one hand while the other hand beat a cylindrical drum.
[1] Due to the limited number of notes that can be played on an antara, early musicians' most likely worked in groups, coordinating the timing and pitch of their instruments to extend the range of sounds produced. [2] Other pottery images show two antara players facing
each other while dancing. [3] Each player holds a set of pipes so that both sets are connected to the other set by a string, as if to suggest that those two antaras should be played together. [4] Even to this day, descendants of the Incas, the Quechua people of Peru and Bolivia, prefer
to play matched antaras bound together.
Unfortunately, the music of the Incas can
probably never be exactly re-creating. Yet one can hear in the music of their descendants, beautiful
variations on a musical sound that has survived for many centuries.

If the writer were to change the pronoun one to we in the preceding sentence, this closing sentence would:


A. indicate that the writer is a descendant of the Incas.
B. suggest that the essay's audience are all musicians
C. take on a somewhat more personal tone.
D. become more clearly a call to action.
10. Surrounded by the ancient city of
Rome, Vatican City is an independent nation
on the west bank of the Tiber River. This tiny
country—about one-sixth of a square mile in all—is also home to a disproportionately large number of
sites with great historical, artistic, and which have
religious significance.
The Vatican Museums house a great many valuable
paintings, sculptures, pieces of jewelry, and tapestries, as well as the world's most extensive collections of ancient manuscripts. Scholars often probe the museums'
archives of early written works for insights into lives
led long ago.
Accordingly, St. Peter's Basilica, the largest cathedral in the Northern Hemisphere, is remarkable.
Built upon second-century foundations. St. Peter's features a dome designed by the artist and architect
Michelangelo.10 Intricate mosaics—enormous "paintings" fashioned from millions of tiny cut stones
of various colors—lining each of the basilica's several
smaller domes.

At this point, the writer is considering adding the following true statement:

In addition to being an architect and artist, Michelangelo wrote poetry, including more than 300 sonnets.

Should the writer make this addition here?

A. Yes, because it provides further details about Michelangelo, who designed the dome at St. Peter's.

B. Yes, because it reinforces the paragraph's implication that Michelangelo was extremely talented.

C. No, because it distracts attention from the paragraph's focus, which is on the architecture and visual art of St. Peter's.

D. No, because it adds more information about Michelangelo, who made only small contributions to Vatican City's art and architecture.
In 1916, as the Democratic Party's national convention met in St. Louis, Missouri, to nominate candidates for the presidency and vice-presidency and to establish a platform, a set of positions on
issues. Therefore, suffragists (those who advocated extending voting rights to women) wanted the
Democrats' platform to support women's right to vote.
[1] Edna Gellhorn, a leader in the Missouri
Equal Suffrage League, planned a "silent parade" without movement or music or speech. [2] She gathered together 7,000 St. Louis women. [3] Similar forms of demonstrations, known as "walkless-talkless parades," had been adopted by national woman suffrage organizations in Washington, D.C. [4] Gellhorn made telephone calls and wrote letters. [5] They donned yellow sashes over white dresses and held yellow umbrellas aloft as they lined both sides of Locust Street between the convention delegates' hotel and the meeting hall.
At the end of the "Golden Lane," as the event was also called, Gellhorn organized a three-tiered "living
tableau," which a live scene was presented by silent, costumed participants. Women wearing white
represented states where women could vote.

8.

The writer is considering revising the preceding part of this sentence ("At the end of the 'Golden Lane,' as the event was also called,") to read as follows:

At the end of the parade,

If the writer did this, the essay would primarily lose:

E. an indication that Edna Gellhorn preferred the term "Golden Lane" to the term "walkless-talkless parade."
F. a possible point of confusion, as the proposed revision eliminates a term that was not explained.
G. another historical detail about the parade described in the preceding paragraph.
H. details that help establish the time and place of the essay.
;