Terms in this set (65)

114.
(p. 209-210) Describe the need for achievement, need for affiliation, and need for power as discussed in McClelland's Need Theory. Discuss the managerial implications of McClelland's needs.


The need for achievement represents the desire to accomplish something difficult, to master, manipulate, or organize physical objects, human beings, or ideas, to do this as rapidly and as independently as possible, to overcome obstacles and attain a high standard, to excel one's self, to rival and surpass others, and to increase self-regard by the successful exercise of talent. Achievement-motivated people share three characteristics: a preference for working on tasks of moderate difficulty, a preference for situations in which performance is due to their efforts rather than other factors, and they desire more feedback on their successes and failures. People with a high need for affiliation prefer to spend more time maintaining social relationships, joining groups, and wanting to be loved. Individuals high in this need are not the most effective managers or leaders because they have a hard time making difficult decisions without worrying about being disliked. The need for power reflects an individual's desire to influence, coach, teach, or encourage others to achieve. People with a high need for power like to work, are concerned with discipline, and concerned with self-respect. There is a positive and negative side to this need. McClelland proposes that top managers should have a high need for power coupled with a low need for affiliation. Individuals with high achievement motivation are not the best suited for top management positions.
114.
(p. 209-210) Describe the need for achievement, need for affiliation, and need for power as discussed in McClelland's Need Theory. Discuss the managerial implications of McClelland's needs.


The need for achievement represents the desire to accomplish something difficult, to master, manipulate, or organize physical objects, human beings, or ideas, to do this as rapidly and as independently as possible, to overcome obstacles and attain a high standard, to excel one's self, to rival and surpass others, and to increase self-regard by the successful exercise of talent. Achievement-motivated people share three characteristics: a preference for working on tasks of moderate difficulty, a preference for situations in which performance is due to their efforts rather than other factors, and they desire more feedback on their successes and failures. People with a high need for affiliation prefer to spend more time maintaining social relationships, joining groups, and wanting to be loved. Individuals high in this need are not the most effective managers or leaders because they have a hard time making difficult decisions without worrying about being disliked. The need for power reflects an individual's desire to influence, coach, teach, or encourage others to achieve. People with a high need for power like to work, are concerned with discipline, and concerned with self-respect. There is a positive and negative side to this need. McClelland proposes that top managers should have a high need for power coupled with a low need for affiliation. Individuals with high achievement motivation are not the best suited for top management positions.
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