120 terms

5th Grade STAAR Reading Vocab Review

This is a great way to practice the vocabulary you need to know for the STAAR test.
STUDY
PLAY
setting
where and when the story takes place
conflict
the problem in the story
resolution
finding a solution to a problem
main idea
what a piece of writing is mainly about
theme
The central idea or message of a work, the insight it offers into life
summary
brief statement of the main events of a story
chronological order
in the time order in which events happened
persuasive
used to convice the reader of the writer's point of view
procedural
writing that tells how to do something
myth
a fictional tale that explains the actions of gods or the causes of natural phenomena
origin
a beginning or coming into being
autobiography
the story of a person's life written by that person in first person point of view
point of view
the perspective from which a story is told
first person point of view
Told from the viewpoint of one of the characters using the pronouns "I" and We"
third person limited point of view
the narrator focuses on the thoughts and feelings of only one character
third person omniscent point of view
told by an all-knowing narrator from outside the story who reveals what every character thinks and feels
alliteration
the repetition of consonant SOUNDS at the beginning of words. For example, Sally sells seashells by the sea shore.
personification
giving human qualities to non-human things
simile
comparison using like or as. Clue: You "smile" when you see someone you like." Example: The car was as cold as ice.
idiom
an expression with a meaning different from the literal meaning of the individual words
convey
To communicate or express
flashback
when a portion of the story goes back in time
foreshadow
The use of clues to suggest events that will happen later in the plot
inference/infer
to draw a reasonable conclusion from the information presented
justify
to demonstrate that something is right; to defend with reasons
media
the various methods of communicating information
thesaurus
A listing of words with synonyms and antonyms
context clues
Clues in surrounding text that help the reader determine the meaning of an unknown word
genre
a division or type of literature
dialogue
a conversation between two persons
captions
small text found near a picture that provides important information about the picture
free verse
poetry that does not contain regular patterns of rhythm or rhyme
stage directions
instructions for actors and stage crew, usually set in italics
author's purpose
The reason the author has for writing. (Inform, persuade, express, & entertain)
diagrams
A drawing that shows or explains something...usually includes labels and captions.
illustrations
Drawings or photographs that help explain the text
moral
A practical lesson about right and wrong
sensory details
words and phrases that create imagery by using the 5 senses
fiction
a literary work based on the imagination and not necessarily on fact.
nonfiction
Writing that is factual, not creative or fictional.
historical fiction
fiction that involves an event in history. Contains historical facts, events, or people, but is not true.
drama
a story written to be performed by actors; a play
onomatopoeia
the use of words that represent sounds
rhyme scheme
the pattern of rhyme in a poem (ex. ABAB)
internal rhyme
when two words rhyme in the same line of poetry
contradict
to disagree; to say the opposite
mislead
Give the wrong idea; to deceive; to lead someone in the wrong direction
exaggerate
to say that something is larger or greater than it really is; "to stretch the truth"
cause
The reason why something happens
narrator
the person who is telling the story; the speaker
parallelism
repeating words, phrases, or similar grammatical structures to draw an analogy or slogan. ("Just as sun warms the earth, this blanket warms you!") ("Get a bucket of chicken and have a barrel of fun!")
comparison
shows how two things are alike/different or how one is better than the other ("This blanket is like a fluffy cloud.") (Commercials might show how one product is better or cheaper than other brands. Politicians might show how their policies or positions are btter than their opponents.)
causality
You can convince others to take action by showing "cause and effect," how one thing leads to another ("If you use this blanket, then you will be warm.") ("Use this and become more popular!") (Chewy Fudge Granola Bars provides kids with essential ingredients, such as whole grains. Chewy Fudge Granola Bars are covered with extra fudge and sweet sugar, making it a fun after school snack for kids.)
exaggerate
Sometimes authors overstate the facts leading to a false of importance. (We will all be doomed if we don't take a stand now!) (This is a one-time offer. You can't get this price after today.) Key words: always, never, everyone
contradictory
a technique used to declare against something and cause the reader to question his/her beliefs or understanding. (Many studies say that watching too much TV can cause young people to do poorly in school. Watching more than 30 hours a week of TV keeps young people informed about the world around them and helps them in their school studies.) (Chewy Fudge Granola Bars provides kids with essential ingredients, such as whole grains. Chewy Fudge Granola Bars are covered with extra fudge and sweet sugar, making it a fun afterschool snack for kids.)
misleading
This unreliable information is a technique used to mislead the reader. (Research studies show __________.) (It's important to look closely at the "evidence," however, because it can be misleading.) (Authors might use words such as may, might, can , could, some, many, often, virtually, as many as, or up to.)
metaphor
a comparison or two unlike things without using like or as
hyperbole
elaborate exaggeration
imagery
a collection of word pictures that appeal to the reader; uses devices such as metaphor, simile, etc.
exposition
the part of a story (usually the beginning) which explains the background and setting of the story. The characters are often introduced.
rising action
the central part of a story during which various problems arise, leading up to the climax
climax
the turning point in the action of a story--the problem is solved
falling action
the part of a story which follows the climax or turning point
resolution
the ending or final outcome of a story
description or list (organizational pattern of expository text)
signal words include:
to begin with; first; second; next; then; finally; last; most important; also; in fact; for example; for instance; in front; beside; near; for example; sensory details (describing what we hear, see, taste, smell and feel)
sequence or chronological (organizational pattern of expository text)
signal words include: first; second; third; before; on (date); not long after; after that; next; at the same time; finally; then, following; now; when; since; until; during; at last
compare and contrast
signal words include : like; unlike; but; in contrast; on the other hand; however; both; also; too; as well as; although; yet; nevertheless; as opposed to; whereas
cause and effect
problem and solution
signal words include: therefore; consequently; so; this led to; as a result; because; if...then; since; so that; thus; for this reason;
culture
characteristics of a particular group of people, defined by everything from language, religion, cuisine, social habits, music and arts.
drawing conclusions
combining several pieces of information to make an inference
expository text
this type of text informs or instructs the reader. It is nonfiction.
figurative language
language that means more than what it says on the surface; usually gives us a feeling about its subject
plot
the events that make up a story
prefix
a word part that can be added at the beginning of a word to make a new word
suffix
a word part that can be added at the end of a word to make up a new word
sensory details
words and details that appeal to a reader's senses (sight, touch, taste, hearing, smell, emotion)
sequence
the following of one thing after another
summarize
to make a brief statement of the main events of a story. It has to have the beginning, middle and end. It should be precise (accurate) and concise (to the point).
text features
the parts of a text that stand out (diagram, table of contents, index, etc)
phenomenon
A special fact or event which can be observed and/or documented
effect
a phenomenon that follows and is caused by some previous phenomenon
reinforce
strengthen and support
affect
to influence
reveal
make visible
role
the actions and activities assigned to or required or expected of a person or group
impact
influencing strongly
convey
make known
formal
following rules or customs, often in an exact and proper way
informal
casual
stage directions
Instructions given to the actors so they know how to act and the tone of voice to use. These are used in dramas.
playwright
The person who wrote the play/drama.
props
The items on the stage that the actors use. They give clues about the setting of the play.
costumes
The outfits the actors wear during a play. They give clues about the setting of the play.
third person objective point of view
When the narrator only knows what the characters do and say. It's like a "camera view" of the story.
author's purpose
The reason an author writes the text--to persuade, inform, explain and entertain
motivation
the reason the character says or does something
various
many different types. example: There are various genres of books in the library.
determined
a character trait used to describe someone who doesn't give up easily.
confident
a character trait used to describe someone who feels good about him/herself.
anxious
To feel excited and nervous at the same time.
obvious
Something that is clear or easy to understand.
comical
something funny.
audience
Who the piece of text was originally written for. Example: in a letter, look at who the letter is addressed to (Dear Mom)
dialogue
a conversation between characters set off by quotation marks
beneficial
helpful
compassionate
a character trait that describes someone who has sympathy for others
frugal
a character trait that describes someone who doesn't like to spend money
arrogant
a character trait that describes someone who thinks they're better than other people (snobby)
timid
a character trait that describes someone who is shy
stanza
similar to a paragraph but in a poem
line
similar to a sentence but in a poem
result
the outcome of an experiment or problem
similarity
when two things/people have something in common
subtitle
the smaller title that goes before a new section of the text.
obstacle
something that gets in the way of a goal
valid
true
related
connected
Venn diagram
two circles that overlap each other to show how a text is similar and different
source
Where information comes from.
display
to show.