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The ransom of red chief

STUDY
PLAY
Simile
"There was a town down there, as flat as a flannel cake..."
Verbal Irony
"There was a town down there, as flat as a flannel cake, and called Summit, of course." pg 580
Inferance
"...hair the color of the cover of a magazine you want to buy when you want to catch a train."
Foreshadow
"But wait till I tell you." pg. 581
Imagery
"Then we had supper; and he filled his mouth full of bacon and bread and gravy, and began to talk.
situational irony
The kidnappers ment to take the boy hostage, but instead the boy took them hostage.
dramatic irony
Bill thinks he has rid himself of the boy, but we know that he is standing right behind Bill
Allusion
Bill asks Sam if he knows who his favorite biblical character is and then he says that it is King Herod.
Situational Irony
The father will make the men pay for taking his son, instead of the man paying to get his son back.
Hyperbole
"None of'em ever was subjected to such supernatural tortures as I have been." pg 590
O. Henry
author
summit
Situational location
alabama
Broad location
past
Broad time
Protagonist
Red Chief
Antagonist
Bill Driscoll and narrorator
static
Red Chief is static/dynamic
dynamic
Bill and narrorator are static/dynamic
exposition
The narrorator explained that they needed 2,000 dollars to pull off a fradulent scheme in Western Illinois.
exposition
They selected their victom, the son of a prominent citizen Ebenezer Dorset.
initial incident
Bill and the nararator capture Dorset's son.
rising action
Dorset's son declairs himself Red Chief.
rising action
Rising actionBill and Sam (the narrorator) write the ransom note to Ebenezer Dorset
rising action
Bill voices his annoyance of the boy.
Climax
the father suggests that they return his son and pay him two hundred and fifty dollars. In return he will take his son of their hands. In this section the kidnappers are forced to accept the offer and return Johnny (Red Chief) home and pay the ransom to the father.
Denouement
They return the boy, pay Dorset and run away.
Point of view
First person
silly
The overall mood of the story was...
humorous
The overall tone of the story was...
Direct characterization
Characterization: "The kid was a boy of ten, with bas-relief freckles and hair the color of a magazine you would but at the newsstand when you want to catch a train."
characters words
Characterization: "I was nine last birthday. I hate to go to school. Rats ate up sixteen of Jimmy Talbots's aunt's speckled hen's eggs... Do Oxen make any noise? Why are oranges round? Have you got beds to sleep on in this cave?"
characters actions
Characterization: I went out and caught that boy and shook him until his frechles rattled.