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ENG 374 TEST 1, Gatsby Test

Terms in this set (72)

Situated at the end of Daisy's East Egg dock and barely visible from Gatsby's West Egg lawn, the green light represents Gatsby's hopes and dreams for the future. (Ch. 1)

In Chapter 9, Nick compares the green light to how America, rising out of the ocean, must have looked to early settlers of the new nation.
At the end of the novel Nick concludes the book with these words, "Gatsby believed in the green light, the orgastic future that year by year recedes before us. It eluded us then, but that's no matter—tomorrow we will run faster, stretch out our arms farther. And then one fine morning— So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past."

The green light at the end of Daisy's dock is a significant symbol within the book. To Gatsby, the green light represents his dream, which is Daisy. To attain her would be completing Gatsby's American Dream. The first time the green light is seen in the novel is also the first time Nick sees Gatsby. Fitzgerald writes, "...he stretched out his arms toward the dark water in a curious way, and, far as I was from him, I could have sworn he was trembling. Involuntarily I glanced seaward - and distinguished nothing except a single green light, minute and far away..." The green light is described as 'minute and far away' which makes it appear impossible to reach. This will prove to be true for Gatsby. The green light also represents society's desire and the seeming impossibility of achieving the materialistic American Dream.