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Greek Theater Terms 101

Eng II Greek Theater Terms
STUDY
PLAY
Skene
Stage building behind orchestra where the actors changed costumes.
Dithyramb
was an ode to Dionysus
Deuteragonist
a sidekick who accompanies the main protagonist (Aeschylus)
Orchestra
circular acting space at center, translates as "dancing place"
Theatron
Spectator seating; "seeing place" (embankment)
Tritagonist
a third character which allowed more complex interactions of dialogue (Sophocles)
Thymele
Altar of Dionysus that sits in the center of Orchestra
Proskenion
portion immediately in front of the skene was used as an acting area
Parodos (stage diagram)
passage ways for the actors to make their entrances and exits
Ekkykelemia
cart rolled out to show bodies of warriors killed in battle
Prohedria
stone seats reserved for prestigious people originally for the priests
Exodos
the final or exit scene
Prologos
establishes dramatic situation
Parados (play structure)
the first choral ode of Chorus, "exposition"
Paean
a hymn of praise to the gods
Episode
main action, equivalent of an "Act"
Stasima
choral interlude, makes comment on the action in the Episode
Exodos
Final summation and exit of Chorus
Chorus
composed of 15 men that express opinions, gives advice, and author's point of view
Choragos
leader of the chorus that can play a individual role in the play
Strophe
part of the ode moving from right to left
Antistrophe
left to right
Ode
separated each scene; no curtain; also response to scene
Epode
final stanza of the ode
Three Unities
One Day, One Setting, One Plot (Aristotle)
Paean
choral hymn in praise of a god (Dionysos)
Tragedy
as defined by Aristotle, a play in which suffering brings about self-knowledge; serious treatment of religious and moral questions.
Katharsis
a cleansing the viewer receives from watching; a release from tension
Aristeia
excellence
Harmartia
(tragic flaw) - act, moral flaw or intellectual mistake
Peripeteia
reversal of fortune
Anagnorisis
understanding
Polytheistic
many gods
Anthropomorphism
giving human qualities to the gods
Hubris
setting up of self as superior to all humans, even equal to God (gods); extreme pride; arrogance
Deus ex machina
crane mounted on skene; used to bring about the appearance of gods. usually a stuffed dummy suspended in air.
Dramatic irony
discrepancy between what the character thinks and what the audience knows.
Oracle
of Apollo at Delphi; one who delivers god's message to man.
Regicide
killing of a king
Patricide
killing one's own father