37 terms

Native American, Puritanism, Colonialism, or Romanticism

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focus of imagination over reason
Romanticism
Stories passed on through oral tradition
Native American
written without embellishments; simple style
Puritanism
a reliance of intuition over fact
Romanticism
intense interest of nature and the American landscape
Romanticism
they were chosen by God to build a "City Upon a Hill"
Puritanism
writing from this time period usually appeared in the format of historical accounts and personal diaries
Puritan
Believed in predestination
Puritanism
Emphasized science and logic
Colonialism
Humans can arrive at truth through reason, not intuition
Colonialism
Main function was to glorify God
Puritanism
Stressed humanity's inherit goodness
Romanticism
Archetypes
Native American
Believed that man is, by nature, a sinner
Puritanism
Stories are intended to unite a group of people through shared culture and experiences
Native American
Concentration on social, political, and scientific improvements
Colonialism
The age of pamphlets
Colonialism
The age of sermons
Puritanism
Imagination takes precedence over reason
Romanticism
Supernatural events are likely to occur
Romanticism
Circular view of nature
Native American
Writers turn their attention towards nature
Romanticism
This movement included Transcendentalist literature
Romanticism
Each individual has the power to improve themselves everyday
Romanticism
Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau were responsible for Transcendentalism during this movement
Romanticism
"The best course to prevent falling into the pit is to keep at the greatest distance from it; he who will be so bold as to attempt to dance upon the brink of the pit, may find by woeful experience that it is a righteous thing with God that he should fall into the pit."
Puritanism
I cannot conceive any more honourable, than that which flows from the uncorrupted choice of a brave and free people—The purest Source & original Fountain of all Power..."
Colonialism
In the beginning there was only darkness. Suddenly a small bearded man, the One Who Lives Above, appeared rubbing his eyes as if just awakened. The man, the Creator, rubbed his hands together and there appeared a little girl, Girl-Without-Parents. The creator rubbed his face with his hands and there stood the Sun-God. Again Creator rubbed his sweaty brow and from his hands dropped Small-boy. Now there were four gods.Then he created Tarantula, Big Dipper, Wind, Lightning-Maker and Lightning-Rumbler. All four gods shook hands so that their sweat mixed together. Then Creator rubbed his palms together from which fell a small round, brown ball. They took turns kicking it and with each kick the ball grew larger. Creator told Wind to go inside the ball and blow it up. Then Tarantula spun a black cord which he attached to the ball and went to the east pulling as hard as he could.

He repeated this exercise with a blue cord to the south, a yellow cord to the west and a white cord to the north. When he was done the brown ball had become the earth.
Native American
In this pleasing, contrite wood-life which God allows me, let me record day by day my honest thought without prospect or retrospect, and, I cannot doubt, it will be found symmetrical, though I mean it not, and see it not. My book should smell of pines and resound with the hum of insects. The swallow over my window should interweave that thread or straw he carries in his bill into my web also. We pass for what we are. Character teaches above our wills. Men imagine that they communicate their virtue or vice only by overt actions, and do not see that virtue or vice emit a breath every moment.
Romanticism
"Faint not, poor soul, in God still trust;
Fear not the things thou suffer must;
For, whom he loves he doth chastise,
And then all tears wipes from their eyes."
Puritanism
"I expect to pass through this world but once. Any good therefore that I can do, or any kindness or abilities that I can show to any fellow creature, let me do it now. Let me not defer it or neglect it, for I shall not pass this way again."
Romanticism
"For we must consider that we shall be as a city upon a hill. The eyes of all people are upon us. So that if we shall deal falsely with our God in this work we have undertaken, and so cause Him to withdraw His present help from us, we shall be made a story and a by-word through the world. We shall open the mouths of enemies to speak evil of the ways of God, and all professors for God's sake. We shall shame the faces of many of God's worthy servants, and cause their prayers to be turned into curses upon us till we be consumed out of the good land whither we are going. "
Puritanism
"I shall constantly bear in Mind, that as the Sword was the last Resort for the preservation of our Liberties, so it ought to be the first thing laid aside, when those Liberties are firmly established."
Colonialism
"They tell us, sir, that we are weak; unable to cope with so formidable an adversary. But when shall we be stronger? Will it be the next week, or the next year? Will it be when we are totally disarmed, and when a British guard shall be stationed in every house? Shall we gather strength by irresolution and inaction? Shall we acquire the means of effectual resistance by lying supinely on our backs and hugging the delusive phantom of hope, until our enemies shall have bound us hand and foot? Sir, we are not weak if we make a proper use of those means which the God of nature hath placed in our power."
Colonialism
"Let a crown be placed thereon, by which the world may know, that so far as we approve of monarcy, that in America the law is King. For as in absolute governments the King is law, so in free countries the law ought to be King; and there ought to be no other."
Colonialism
"Each morning sees some task begin.
Each evening sees it close;
Something attempted, something done,
Has earned a night's repose."
Romanticism
The woman made as if to leave the lodge, but then she turned and spoke again. 'This pipe will carry you to the end. Remember that in me there are four ages. I am going now, but I will look on your people in every age, and at the end I will return.'

She now walked slowly around the lodge in a sunwise direction. The people were silent and filled with awe. Even the hungry young children watched her, their eyes alive with wonder. Then she left. But after she had walked a short distance, she faced the people again and sat down on the prairie. The people gazing after her were amazed to see that when she stood up she had become a young red and brown buffalo calf. The calf walked further into the prairie, and then lay down and rolled over, looking back at the people.

When she stood up she was a white buffalo. The white buffalo walked on until she was a bright speck in the distant prairie, and then rolled over again, and became a black buffalo. This buffalo walked away, stopped, bowed to the four directions of the earth, and finally disappeared over the hill.
Native American